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Thread: UAA aviation

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    Default UAA aviation

    Greetings.

    I grew up reading my parent's 1970's era private pilot manuals... Rode a couple smaller birds as a kid with either my dad at the yoke, or one of my middle school teachers... Turned 17, parents gave me a permission slip to go on a field trip with Uncle Sam... got to ride as self propelled cargo on a multitude of aircraft in the military for 9 years.

    Now, I'm married, kid on the way... and the way the math is coming out the GI Bill will pay my whole way for a bachelors in professional piloting at UAA.

    Everyone on here that replies to prospective commercial pilots seems to say you need a wife who makes the living since you won't be... Well, I get a check from the gubment now as part of the deal... and the wife has a steady job. Between those two, we have all the bills covered.

    Basically, when I drop the hammer on everything, I'll still be flying for fun, I'll just be getting paid for it. I've worked at a FBO here in anchorage, and understand a little bit about remote flying having had to fly into/out of/support flying at, a remote mining site.

    My biggest question for anyone who has gone through the program at UAA:

    How many hours did you come out of there with? I'm just wondering if the program actually gets you enough hours to "do" anything beyond instructing... I don't mind building hours... because that's time flying I'm just wondering what all I'll have accomplished hours wise, at the end of the program.

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    Hi AkRanger, I went through the program at uaa. If you do the bachelor program you will end up with roughly 250 to 300 hours. Most who finish end up working either at uaa or one of the other various flight schools around merrill. By flight instructing for awhile you can get the min. 500 hours needed to be eligible to work for a part 135 operation.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AkPacer View Post
    Hi AkRanger, I went through the program at uaa. If you do the bachelor program you will end up with roughly 250 to 300 hours. Most who finish end up working either at uaa or one of the other various flight schools around merrill. By flight instructing for awhile you can get the min. 500 hours needed to be eligible to work for a part 135 operation.
    Thanks for the reply!

    I knew I'd need to build hours, but I didn't have a warm and fuzzy about where I'd stand after the program. How did you like the program when you went through?

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    Get some newer books. Many rules, regs and airspace names have changed since then.
    Rod Machado writes nice books.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by AK_Ranger View Post
    Thanks for the reply!

    I knew I'd need to build hours, but I didn't have a warm and fuzzy about where I'd stand after the program. How did you like the program when you went through?
    It was a good program, the only downfall is it really is tuff to finish in four years. You have to remember that on top of a full load of classes, you have to have time to fly to! But if you put your head down, work hard, and plow through, it can be done.

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    Default Rod Machado

    Quote Originally Posted by Float Pilot View Post
    Get some newer books. Many rules, regs and airspace names have changed since then.
    Rod Machado writes nice books.
    I just got my first taste of his books the other day, man he really does a good job correlating aviation with the everyday world. I had never seen an aviation textbook that informal, the jokes just cracked me up.

  7. #7

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    AK Ranger? What kinda Ranger? Park? School? Scroll?
    The winner isn't the person with the most gold when they die, but rather, the person with the most stories.

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    Quote Originally Posted by headoutdaplane View Post
    AK Ranger? What kinda Ranger? Park? School? Scroll?
    Stereo scrolls at one point.
    *edited to add*
    Originally issued a black beret with 3 ticks on my flash... since you brought up scrolls

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    As long as you realize it is a tough road to success, I would say go for it. Very few make it to a really $$$ career, but many find lesser flying jobs rewarding. I would say the lesser jobs are still a lot of fun. It iss very competetive, hard work, skill and luck could find you in one of the more interesting aviation jobs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by windypoint View Post
    As long as you realize it is a tough road to success, I would say go for it. Very few make it to a really $$$ career, but many find lesser flying jobs rewarding. I would say the lesser jobs are still a lot of fun. It iss very competetive, hard work, skill and luck could find you in one of the more interesting aviation jobs.

    I guess that's where I have it "better" since my primary purpose is simply to get a degree in *something* and what better to get it in, than a program that will let me be able to do one of the things I enjoy significantly. Even if I don't find a job to make a living doing it, I still come out with a pilot's license and a good bit of instruction.

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    Sorry about the thread hijack here. I was C 1/75 from '83 to '86 and Ranger class 2-85. Black beret, and jungle fatigues. When I started there was steel pots, c-rats, and two batts, ended up with Kevlar, a new Reg't and MREs. Are you up on ArmyRanger.com?

    As to the question: I went to Spartan School of Aeronautics in Tulsa a 141 school, and believe strongly that you can get a much, much better bang for your buck going part 91 by buying your own 172 and hiring instructors. I would go to school for a subject that you will enjoy (80% of degree holders don't work in the field they studied) and isn't as limiting as Airline science or whatever. Airlines could care less what degree you have, and most Alaska operators don't care if you have one at all. Just my opinion.
    The winner isn't the person with the most gold when they die, but rather, the person with the most stories.

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    Quote Originally Posted by headoutdaplane View Post
    Sorry about the thread hijack here. I was C 1/75 from '83 to '86 and Ranger class 2-85. Black beret, and jungle fatigues. When I started there was steel pots, c-rats, and two batts, ended up with Kevlar, a new Reg't and MREs. Are you up on ArmyRanger.com?

    As to the question: I went to Spartan School of Aeronautics in Tulsa a 141 school, and believe strongly that you can get a much, much better bang for your buck going part 91 by buying your own 172 and hiring instructors. I would go to school for a subject that you will enjoy (80% of degree holders don't work in the field they studied) and isn't as limiting as Airline science or whatever. Airlines could care less what degree you have, and most Alaska operators don't care if you have one at all. Just my opinion.

    Yep, I'm RSOVRanger on ArmyRanger.com.

    I'd prefer going 91 just because of the increased hours, but then I can't get the GI bill to pay for the whole program. I do the degree program and everything's covered one way or another, I get time flying, a pilots license, and a degree. If I use the commercial license down the road cool beans.. but in any case I get a pilots license with instrument rating effectively for free.

    And flying's something I've always enjoyed... especially now that I wouldn't have to do it wearing everything I freakin own....

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    Quote Originally Posted by windypoint View Post
    As long as you realize it is a tough road to success...
    It iss very competetive, hard work, skill and luck could find you in one of the more interesting aviation jobs.
    I would guess that Luck will only play a small part, based on this...

    Quote Originally Posted by AK_Ranger View Post
    Stereo scrolls at one point.
    Originally issued a black beret with 3 ticks on my flash... since you brought up scrolls
    Thanks for your service, AK_R!

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