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Thread: Bear Fences On Gravel Bars

  1. #1
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    Default Bear Fences On Gravel Bars

    Since most of our float camping is on gravel bars which bear fences have you found to be the most suitable? I'm mostly concerned about grounding issues.

    I'd prefer to have along 2 fences for a group. One for the boats and another for the tents. I've done a little reading on UDAP's system, but not on others. http://www.udap.com/bearshock.htm

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default

    Use mine on gravel every year. Just use alternating hot and ground wires. I make the middle one the ground and the top and bottom hot. I have also used a long copper rod and salt water as a ground as well. PM me for details.
    I use the UDAP model.

    Here is another thread on the same subject.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=29643

    Steve

  3. #3
    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Default

    We use the 4 lb UDAP fence on our remote floats. Follow up with Stid as he has some good ideas on making the fence more effective on gravel bars. We used our kit and it worked fine on gravel in NW. I will be taking some of Stids ideas myself next time. Great little fence and offers some peace of mind at night. We use the small mesh bags from Campmor to anchor the fence on all corners. Just small bags we fill with rocks and pull out at about 7' with 550 paracord. This holds the fence nice and taught and is helpful when the wind blows. We use these same bags, just larger ones, for our tents as well. The "rock bags" work far better than stakes on gravel bars. Campmor sells about 4 sizes of these. Also, they have a nice mesh duffle we keep fly rods, stove, water filter, lunch, etc.. in while traveling down river. That is nice as you don't have to dig through the dry bags to get stuff you need during the day. Below are a few pics...









    Below is the mesh duffle bag full of stuff. Very convenient way to keep certain items handy in the boat. Pictured here in our Ally pack canoe...




    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___70091


    http://www.campmor.com/outdoor/gear/Product___48220
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  4. #4
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Prob be a display at GASS...

    The link stid posted is good info. The guy from High Country (http://www.electrobearguard.com/) ref in the last post, is usually at the Gr AK Sprtsmns Show, coming up here soon (April 8-11, http://greatalaskasportsmanshow.com/).

    Good luck.
    Last edited by Michael Strahan; 03-05-2010 at 08:38. Reason: fixed link

  5. #5
    Member Birdstrike's Avatar
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    Thanks guys. That's good info.

  6. #6
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    Default one more possibility..

    Bottom line... alternating your pos+ and neg- strands is the easiest way to combat low effective ground.

    I have a few other suggestions tho...

    When you have soil that allows for some ground but it's low or minimal there are a few other things I will try...

    When looking for a camp spot on the river try to find a slack water area... I don't know what they are really called... But an area of slack water. A protected area...

    We would raft in and unload our gear and then walk the raft into the back water. We left the raft floating in 3-5" of water, securely tied it off to a tree or BIG rock and then set the fence up around it... Use the water is your ground... Set your post up in the mud, string as many (positive/hot) strands around the fence and wha-la... you've got 100% effective ground...

    Not something you can do in every situation but one possibility that worked several times for us on long river hunt.

    One other suggestion. When setting up the fence in an area w/ low effective ground such as frozen or dry ground I also do this:

    Set up the fence perimeter with only a 3 strands of poly wire. I set the top and bottom as pos+ and then make the middle a negative-. IF anything touches the the middle in combination with top or bottom they get 100% effective shock... Now for the next part... You have to be creative on how to make this work but once you do... IT's the BEST of both worlds...

    After the fence is up and has been tested I shut it down. I then use the left over poly wire to ground your middle -neg strand to the earth. I will route the left over poly wire from the middle -neg strand to the ground and then weave it trough the grass and rocks around the outside perimeter of the fence. I basically create a zig-zag welcome mat around the outside of the fence. I use numerous aluminum stakes and a couple hundred feet of poly wire around the outside of the fence.

    In my opinion this is THE MOST effective and efficient way to set up a fence...

    Poly wire is cheap, light weight and only needs to be tied in a knot to make a thorough connection. I carry lots of it... cut it, splice it, tie it, use it... Be creative and keep the pos+ from touching the neg- and you are good to go... Replace poly wire as necessary or like me.. Just add to it. The stuff is great. A 660 ft role is less that $15...

    Feel free to ask if any part of this did not make sense... I'm in a bit of hurry and you know how that sometimes translates... later... Winmag

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