Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: Fly fishing for salmon in the kenai area

  1. #1

    Default Fly fishing for salmon in the kenai area

    I are coming to alaska for a couple of months this summer. I will be there in mid June through July. It is my frst trip to alaska. For years now I've been fishing for salmon on the smith river in northern california and the chetco river in southern oregon. Can I expect to find areas around the kenai peninsula that are better than others for fly fishing? Salmon will be my main target. I feel lost coming to such a large area and have no clue where to start.

  2. #2
    Member 900fusion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Menominee, Michigan, United States
    Posts
    1,021

    Default

    you can try the kenai river or kasilof. if fishing kenai pay very good attention to the regs. correct me if im wrong but you main targets will be kings and reds in that time frame. or if unsure book a guide for a day or two.
    -Tight Lines & head shakin

  3. #3

    Default

    Hey 900fusion,

    Thanks for the quik reply! I'm looking at the map of the two rivers you mentioned, do you normally fish the mouths of these rivers near the bay or upstream and if so how far up. Do you fish from shore or in a boat?

    In Calif. and Ore. I use an 8" pram to fish out of, as do most of the other fly fishermen. It's fun, when you hook up, you pull anchors and off you go, the fish pulling you around until he's had enough. I do keep an occational fish but it's mostly catch and release down here. I'm bringing my 14' alluminum with me not knowing if I will really need it or not. I do hope to use it to possibly get some halibut in the homer area?

    What about fly patterns and sizes? No doubt Alaska will be different from my home waters. I'm really looking forward this once in a lifetime experience.

  4. #4
    Member 900fusion's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Menominee, Michigan, United States
    Posts
    1,021

    Default

    I normallly fish from shore, on the kenai i fish around the russain river which connects to the kenai, middle part of kenai and he upper part of the kenai. as for the kasilof i have not fished there as of yet but plan on it this year, patterns are ESL's, Dolly llama's, sculpins. best thing when you get here stop by a tackle shop and ask them what they are using on those rivers, i know that sportsmans has a board of most of the rivers and will state what people are using or suggest what to use on a perticular river. and sizes are sketchy some areas of the kenai have a gap restiction also with the russian river.
    -Tight Lines & head shakin

  5. #5
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kingfish View Post
    For years now I've been fishing for salmon on the smith river in northern california and the chetco river in southern oregon.
    It has been decades since I have thought about fishing on those rivers as a kid. Spent 4 years in Brookings, but never had a single hook up on the river. Trolling was fun out on the ocean - lots of silvers - and even had my first taste of commercial fishing when I was 12.

    The first time I found a need for coffee was at age 11 on the Winchuck after 4 hours of failed winter steelhead fishing. Fish were in but they wanted nothing to do with me. Man was I cold. Never did develop a taste for the whole frozen rod guide thing.

    You will find the fishing here significantly different in terms of water conditions (not glass clear), but the technique will be the same for fly fishing. There are lots of resources for AK flys that are species specific. Most salmon are caught on attactor patterns.

    If you are mobile you will want to go to more than the Kenai. You will want to fish the streams along the Parks Highway. Kings will be in most streams by mid June in quality numbers, but the fishing is typically weekend only. The crowds can be a serious pain on some streams, but those crowds are still localized and large sections of the streams can be much less crowded.

    Spend a lot of time reading the regulations before you come up.

    You will be coming during the time of the first run of reds on the Kenai/Russian, so search for that info on here and enjoy that fishery. To compare think about the jetty crowds on the Chetco when the fish start coming in and then triple it.

  6. #6
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    ok well the russian river in cooper landing opens on june 14th at midnite...sometimes the fish are there in numbers, sometimes they arent....during your time frame i would suggest your best luck will be in the sterling area (bings landing, naptowne,moose river,kenai keys road, outlet at Skilak Lake) for reds.....for kings soldotna will be better (more access points in town plus dont overlook funny river road) your likelyhood of catching a king, much less hooking one, is pretty slim from the bank but it can be done...definately read the regs well and make sure you understand as they can be tricky....reds are pretty easy to hook up with, just use a russian river red fly with a 1/2- 3/4 oz rubber core or pencil weight 30-48" above your fly and let it drift....they call it flippin and its the most effective way to hook into reds....they are great fighters and the kenai river has good current so a medium rod is needed with 15-25lb test a necessity. for kings you should have at least 25lb test (40 is better)...the mouth of the kenai is very wide and deep as is the Kasilof and is pretty much unfishable with rod and reel....plus there will be hordes of dipnetters about both rivermouths.....there are more (and less crowded) opportunities for kings and trout farther south such as ninilchik and anchor rivers and deep creek. these streams also have steelhead in them (C+R only) and all have resident dolly varden char. These will mainly be weekend only fisheries. personally id keep my base camp in sterling as it is centrally located to the best kenai river fishing. hope this can get you started.



    Release Lake Trout

  7. #7
    Member Hunt&FishAK's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Valley trash
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Oh and dont forget your Alaska 2010 KING STAMP!



    Release Lake Trout

  8. #8
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    There are three books you need to read.

    1. Scott Haugen's "Flyfisher's Guide to Alaska"

    2. Troy Letherman's "Topwater, Flyfishing Alaska.."

    3. Gunnar Pederson's "Fishing Alaska's Kenai River"
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    139

    Default

    Gunnar's book is a good start. Stop in at Trout Fitters in Cooper Landing or at Trust Worthy in Soldotna. They will give you the run down on what's happening in their respective areas. I grew up there but all I can say is that the runs vary day to day and if you look for lots of people and start walking till you have room you will find some fish. Local shops can give you the where and how.
    River Runnin

  10. #10

    Default

    Thanks to all for your replies! It is greatly appreciated! I've ordered the books that were recommended!

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Hartford Michigan
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Spend lots of time here, do lots of reading. You can also do a search and read posts put up during the time frame you will be here from last year, which will give you an idea of whats going on.

    Stay flexable, look at all your options. When we started planning our first trip it was all for King Salmon fishing. After 7 months of planning, we spent 9 days on the Kenai and spent 15 minutes on the Kenai.

    Have a good time.

  12. #12
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    If you got time to kill, go to Fish Alaska magazine's website. Look up "back issues" and click on each of them to see what articles they contain. Some can be read in full online, but most can't. What I do is find all back issues related to what I am interested in, and buy them. At $9 each, it isn't cheap. But for good info, this is a great way to gain some insight. I have done this for sheefish, bows, etc... Tons of info available in back issues of Fish Alaska.
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •