Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 27

Thread: Building my rifle: free floating or not?

  1. #1
    Member highestview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Haines
    Posts
    1,308

    Default Building my rifle: free floating or not?

    I pretty much stole a barreled mauser action in a beautiful myrtle wood stock from an old man who was never going to finish it. The rifle itself is getting put together, fixed and blued by a gunsmith and I'm considering what to do with the stock. The stock is fitted VERY nicely to the barrell and action. It is not free floating or glass bedded, just very nicely fit. A relative of mine does hardwood turning, finishing and other stuff like that, as well as finishes his own rifles stocks and fixes dings and whatnot. He' going to help me finish the wood when its ready. My question is, is it possible to make the barrell free floating just by sanding the inside of the stock down? Will that ruin it? Is there a way to treat the wood that would keep it from swelling? Can you rub the finish on the inside of the stock or would that ruin accuracy? Is it possible to glass bed it my self? Whats the best way to go about here?

  2. #2
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    In an easy chair in Cyberspace
    Posts
    2,316

    Default

    Nice Gun.

    You want it to look good, unless you have bedded before, let a pro do that. You should be able to get $1 bill between barrel and barrel channel. The bedding compound seals the forend.

  3. #3

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I pretty much stole a barreled mauser action in a beautiful myrtle wood stock from an old man who was never going to finish it. The rifle itself is getting put together, fixed and blued by a gunsmith and I'm considering what to do with the stock. The stock is fitted VERY nicely to the barrell and action. It is not free floating or glass bedded, just very nicely fit. A relative of mine does hardwood turning, finishing and other stuff like that, as well as finishes his own rifles stocks and fixes dings and whatnot. He' going to help me finish the wood when its ready. My question is, is it possible to make the barrell free floating just by sanding the inside of the stock down? Will that ruin it? Is there a way to treat the wood that would keep it from swelling? Can you rub the finish on the inside of the stock or would that ruin accuracy? Is it possible to glass bed it my self? Whats the best way to go about here?
    You could shoot the rifle as is and see how it shoots and then float it if you want better. Most shooters will say to float your barrel and that what I do with mine. I am (used to be) a hooby woodworker and know a good bit about about wood and being a construction contractor I see the effects of the environment on construction wood on a regular basis. Temperature and humidity has a big effect on wood. It will also have an effect on your action as well as your barrel. I have floated three of my own walnut stocked rifles and it's very easy. You can use piece of wood dowel about the same diameter (slightly smaller) as your barrel and wrap a piece of 80 grit sandpaper around it and go to work. You want your finished barrel inlet to be at least a dollar bill's clearance. With wood, I would go at least a sixteenth inch clearance. You can attempt to seal wood, but the only way you will make it completely moisture proof is to completely encapsulate it in a thick eurathane like coating. Action inlet, action screw holes, but plate face, swivel stud holes, everything. So you need to account for your finish in determing your barrel clearance. The more clearance you have, the more forgiveness you will have.

    You can do your own bedding, but it can be tricky. You must understand what you're doing, what to do and not to do. I just epoxy bedded a couple of my rifles which I'll be posting a thead on in a week or so. I read articles and threads for about 2 years before attempting it. They turned out OK, I think... I still have to shoot them. Here's a couple of very good links...

    http://www.6mmbr.com/pillarbedding.html

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...uestion-52589/

    Hope that helps,

    Mark

  4. #4
    Member Big Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Palmer,Alaska
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    I have only bedded several hundred wood stock rifles. Myrtle wood is a good wood to build a stock from as it becomes vary stable wood over the years as it dries. I have no idea where in the country you are so I don't know where to send you to have the rifle bedded. I can tell you one thing that unless you have a lot of bedding under your belt, you need to have someone that really knows what they are doing to get the most out of a proper bedding job. I went through the different methods of bedding wood stocks as the methods progressed we floated the barrels, gave up pressure at the breech end below the chamber, up pressure at the forearm (which worked well for thin barrels) All of these different methods worked for some rifles but not for others. The one thing they all required was shooting with known accurate loads to get the most out of each method of bedding.



    If the rifle was mine I would just make up my mind what I was going to use the rifle for before I sunk any time and money in the rifle. If it was just a hunter, and depending where I lived, I might just leave it alone. I have stocks made from myrtle wood which here in Alaska have proven vary stable as I let them dry before I sent the blanks out to have turned for a couple of years and have not done any glass bedding to once these stocks were finished. They have not shown any changes. All of these blanks came out of California and spent several years in Las Vegas before they came to me and were below 10% moisture content. The real trouble with bedding is most folks don't have clue what all is involved with bedding wood stocks. If this was a fiber glass stock we would have you on the road with information on bedding and good old Marine Tex.


    I forgot to add a vary expensive trick that the guy that stabilizes wood stocks (only will work with what people call French walnut) Wood stocks will not change once they have been stabilized. Another old time method that has worked for me and a top match rifle builder is the use of Woodlife by soaking the stock for months on end. Sure does take a bunch of knowledge to do all this.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  5. #5
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    I pretty much stole a barreled mauser action in a beautiful myrtle wood stock from an old man who was never going to finish it. The rifle itself is getting put together, fixed and blued by a gunsmith and I'm considering what to do with the stock. The stock is fitted VERY nicely to the barrell and action. It is not free floating or glass bedded, just very nicely fit. A relative of mine does hardwood turning, finishing and other stuff like that, as well as finishes his own rifles stocks and fixes dings and whatnot. He' going to help me finish the wood when its ready. My question is, is it possible to make the barrell free floating just by sanding the inside of the stock down? Will that ruin it? Is there a way to treat the wood that would keep it from swelling? Can you rub the finish on the inside of the stock or would that ruin accuracy? Is it possible to glass bed it my self? Whats the best way to go about here?
    Myrtle is a pretty decent stock wood once dried. It has a very high percentage of stuff that blocks the pores and keeps water from leaving evenly. Getting it dry is tough, but it does a far better than average job resisiting subsequent moisture. The smell of camphor it puts out while working it makes it one of my favorites.



    The pump gun at bottom was built for me by my father as college graduation present many years ago. He wrote an article about it in The American Rifleman which in part talked about the epoxy sealer under the oil finish, a process we worked on for a long time and have refined a number of times since. My father died in '98, but I have made more than a few changes since.

    I have spent hundreds of hours lab testing epoxy finishes and considerable time with epoxy engineers at Industrial Formulators in Toronto (recently bought out by WEST system) to find the easiest way to seal wood.

    The top rifle stock weighs 23 ounces and is for a LA 700. The mauser is lighter yet. The butts have been extensively hollowed and the fore ends have been hollowed but filled with broken sections of fishing rods bedded in epoxy fluffed with microballoons. It makes them tough, stiff, and very light.

    Polyurethane as stock finish is not even close to waterproof. It is good, but not close to epoxy or cyanoacrylate (superglue) for sealing the wood and it builds far more than either. Oil finishes are worse than bare wood for sealing out moisture. Most finishes include oils to make them easier to apply and look better.

    There is absolutely no reason for any reasonably handy individual to not bed his own rifles. Obviously some should not be allowed to tie their own shoes... they should know who they are!

    A few points... Sandpaper is not a shaping tool. It is for smoothing a relatively smooth surface and virtually nothing more. Wrapping sandpaper around a dowel or socket of the approximate size is a great way to produce a very poor barrel channel. The barrel channel should be scraped or cut with chisels. The area right along the rim should be left alone until the very end. A long file can then be used to produce a very neat, straight line with just enough draft to create a perfect line.

    Check progress often as a non-floated barrel may be stressing the fore end and holding it to one side or the other. Smoke the barrel with a candle and see if you can see a stressed side...

    I have seen many fouled jobs as a result of the sandpaper "trick" which is slightly better than using the barrel as the mandrel and running sandpaper through the interface between stock and barrel. But only slightly better...

    The inside surfaces of the stock are easy to relieve below grade and coat, seal, fill, and waterproof all at the same time while bedding.

    All surfaces of the stock, including areas under the recoil pad and grip cap (if removable) with a finish equal to the rest of the stock. It is changes in the moisture content of wood that makes it move (temperature at any reasonable level has virtually no effect on wood size) and if one side is more tightly sealed than the other water can move the wood much more easily.

    The methods I use now to finish include heating the stock very thoroughly and deeply and applying slow-curing epoxy (at least 24 hour cure). As the wood cools the air in the stock shrinks, creating an effective vacuum to draw the heated (and therefore thinned) epoxy into the wood. Do not thin epoxy with solvents if you want a waterproof finish... Actually that holds true with any finish, use the absolute minimum amount of solvent if any is needed.

    Lately I have been full length bedding thin barrels without stressing them and have been surprisingly happy with the results.
    art

  6. #6
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    I forgot to add a vary expensive trick that the guy that stabilizes wood stocks (only will work with what people call French walnut) Wood stocks will not change once they have been stabilized. Another old time method that has worked for me and a top match rifle builder is the use of Woodlife by soaking the stock for months on end. Sure does take a bunch of knowledge to do all this.
    Al
    I would never consider the Woodlife approach for anything like a stock and for a ton of reasons... It is basically a carrier for a fungicide and mildicide. Most brands use zinc naphthenate or similar. It is not horribly toxic, but it ain't nothing either... Spreading it around by working the wood is not good.

    It will never fully cure inside the wood and will outgas all sorts of solvents for a very long time. It is a great product for many uses but it was never designed as a fine finish and it will never make one.

    I am curious why the wood stablizer thinks only French walnut will stablize. It is actually one of the most difficult of all of them to stablize, specific gravity depending. And if anyone could ever decide what "French" really is... Since all thin shell walnuts are cultivars of the same species, the wood structures are identical and growing conditions are the variables determining the wood porosity.

    Stablized wood is not a reasonable way to treat a stock as the resin injected will weigh far too much to be practical.
    art

  7. #7

    Default

    Hello Art, up to your old charming self I see

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    Polyurethane as stock finish is not even close to waterproof. It is good, but not close to epoxy or cyanoacrylate (superglue) for sealing the wood and it builds far more than either. Oil finishes are worse than bare wood for sealing out moisture. Most finishes include oils to make them easier to apply and look better.
    Polyurethane varnish, if applied heavy enough, in enough layers, to close all the wood's pores is most certainly waterproof. Spar urethane is used for marine waterproofing and I have used it for some outdoor applications. But I would never use it on wood stocks becuase I do not like the finish it leaves patially because it's shiney which to me is contrary to stealthy hunting. My mention of urethane for waterproofing wasn't a recomendation, just an example of what is required to waterproof wood.

    Your epoxy/oil finish looks great. I assume you're implying that as a sealer it waterproof's the stock. In anycase, it's a little too shiney for me for hunting uses as the critters I hunt are easily alerted by the slightest reflection of light, especially plains deer and antelope that have accute vision at long distances. A beautiful stock for sure, just a little too shiney for my hunting purposes.

    There is absolutely no reason for any reasonably handy individual to not bed his own rifles. Obviously some should not be allowed to tie their own shoes... they should know who they are!
    I agree that most anyone can *learn* to bed an action, but it isn't something that anyone should do without a lot of research. Epoxy is very unforgiving and if you screw it up, it's a permanent screw up. I was astonished in another thread when you suggested that I could undue a bedding job with a heat gun on the epoxy, and that in a plastic injection molded stock no less. Were you kidding? For grins, I put a piece of "practice" epoxy, that I mixed up to test it's consistancy, workability and set up time, onto a piece of wood and heated it with a heat gun. I nearly caught the wood on fire, but the epoxy remained quite rigid. There are a number of things that must considered in bedding an action and it must be well planned out, especially for the beginner. For someone who has done it dozens or hundreds of times, it's second nature, but not for the begiiner.

    A few points... Sandpaper is not a shaping tool. It is for smoothing a relatively smooth surface and virtually nothing more. Wrapping sandpaper around a dowel or socket of the approximate size is a great way to produce a very poor barrel channel. The barrel channel should be scraped or cut with chisels. The area right along the rim should be left alone until the very end. A long file can then be used to produce a very neat, straight line with just enough draft to create a perfect line.
    Sandpaper is most often used for smoothing a surface, but it most certainly can also be used for removing material. I have done with great satisfication many times. Why do you supose they manufacture 40 grit paper? For buffing a table top maybe? Chisels and other tools can be used, but when only a small amount of material needs to be removed, a rough grit paper is IMO, perfect for the job. Using a wood chisel skillfuly is something that takes a lot of practice. I would NEVER suggest to someone without woodworking skills to take a chisel to the forearm of a stock to remove an 8th of an inch of wood. What a hacked up surface that would leave! I have some skill with a wood chisel, but I sure wouldn't pick a chisel to wear down a barrel channel. Sandpaper does a much more even job and is a lot less unforgiving.

    I have seen many fouled jobs as a result of the sandpaper "trick" which is slightly better than using the barrel as the mandrel and running sandpaper through the interface between stock and barrel. But only slightly better...
    Interestingly enough, I have just sanded out a walnut stock on my S&W to float the barrel using my described method to prepare it for a bedding job. Tomorrow I'll take pictures and post them and you can critque the final finsh.

    -Mark

  8. #8
    Member highestview's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Haines
    Posts
    1,308

    Default ....

    Ok, forget about bedding it myself. I'll shoot it before I even finish the stock and see how it shoots. If I decide that I should free-float it, what is the most idiot proof way to do that?

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    220

    Default Dang hap!

    Those rifles are STUNNING!

  10. #10
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Mark
    Not sure exactly where to start...

    I have tested hundreds of 1" cubes of walnut coated with every finish I could find under relatively controlled conditions... No reasonable application of poly short of ridiculous is actually fully waterproof, especially exterior blends.

    Absolutely nothing about a stock finished with epoxy says it must be glossy. Th eoil topcoat is what is seen and a little rottenstone and mineral oil applied by felt cloth will produce an eggshell luster that will not quit.

    The snapshot is simply a quicky photo without setting up defusers and all that. There is quite a bit of light there to keep the colors lively and gives the illusion perhaps of shiney... The stocks really are not terribly shiney.

    If they are too shiney for you a quick visit with slightly more coarse rubbing compound will produce any level of luster you desire. Oil can be extremely subtle.

    I have no idea where you get the idea epoxy is permanent. I have worked with it for many years and have done quite a bit of research with it as a finish. As to your bedding block... it is not even close to a trick to remove one and in point of fact I have removed more than several after bedding when stocks were changed.

    I thought I used the term "heat source" but may very well have used "gun". I have used a heat gun on epoxy many times and even in relatively delicate areas, but it does require a heat shield and a more deft touch. A soldering pen will do the job more directly and is my usual tool of choice.

    For a Sako bedding block I tap the hole, insert a piece of all-thread, install a small arch with a hole in it so I can apply a little pull on the bedding block. Then when I put the heat pen on the block it pops right out within minutes. It takes longer to describe than do...

    A heat gun requires the use of a heat shield on each side with a damp paper towel on the stock. I usually use a pair of drywall knives for heat deflectors.

    While wood can be removed with sandpaper and perhaps even shaped with sandpaper it is far from "workmanlike" and much too imprecise for any semblence of "Craft".

    Chisels below the top edge of a the barrel channel are faster, more accurate, and quite simply the "right way to remove the wood. There are a number of commercial scrapers made especially for the job. I do not particularly like them unless I am dealing with a particularly stoney piece of wood... Like most Turkish I have dealt with. They are significantly smaller than the barrel channel and are designed to remove small amounts of wood at a time.

    Reread what I posted. I did not say anything about using chisels on the surface. I said to remove the wood down in the channel LEAVING the rim alone. THEN USE A FILE to relieve the the wood along the edge and go slowly.

    Let me explain why this is important... When wood is removed from the barrel channel it may relieve pressures held in check by the wood that was removed. It may also expose an area that dries quickly and shrinks, which causes it to move. Fore ends do this regularly when dealing with factory wood because the wood is abused at every step in the drying and production schedule.

    If you just stand there like Joe Bubba indiscriminately sanding wood out with your 40 grit you will never notice the movement... until it is too late.

    Sanding will not ruin every job, but it will get more than its fair share.

    I fully support your absolute right to ignore good advice and screw up your projects. But frankly, I do not have to guess about what I post and I am honestly trying to help you do a better job based on considerable experience and passing on that which has been passed on to me by many far better than I will ever be...
    art

  11. #11
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by highestview View Post
    Ok, forget about bedding it myself. I'll shoot it before I even finish the stock and see how it shoots. If I decide that I should free-float it, what is the most idiot proof way to do that?
    highestview
    As a stockmaker for quite a long time I respectfully disagree with just about every point there. It is far from rocket science to bed a rifle and wood is little different from synthetics in actuality. You have to make sure you cover all the wood and beyond that, same:same.

    Why get grease stains and dings on your stock that may compromise how you finish it? Especially with a light-colored wood like myrtle? I have shot unfinished rifles before when I just had to know how they would shoot... but almost always I regretted it in some way.

    To free float a barrel the way it is done by professionals is probably the simplest and most straight forward. Use chisels and/or scrapers below the edge of the channel to create relief.

    Look for tight spots to indicate if the fore end is going to move to one side or the other as you remove wood on that side. I would bed the rifle before doing this so the action always returns to the same place. Professionals may or may not bed before doing it but their inletting job will not be stressing the situation ahead of time...

    Three common ways to find the tight side starting with the old school method:
    Smoke the barrel with a candle to put enough soot on it to leave a mark when the barreled action is installed.
    If you can find old fashioned carbon paper it will do the same thing for you with less mess.
    Lipstick or Prussian blue can be painted on the barrel. I find the lipstick ridiculously messy and the Prussian Blue much harder to use and the best show is on the metal and finding the spot where it touched the wood is less exact.

    Once you have located the high spots, very carefully file them away. Try to make a long stroke to match the barrel contour line and not make an obvious crooked line. That is why a file is the best tool. It should be angled to VERY slightly undercut the edge. That will keep your inletting line clean.

    If the barrel continues to touch on the same side as you inlet it is telling you one of two things; either you fore end is warping slightly as you remove wood, or it was stressed before you started. The stress can be caused by wood movement after inletting, the action may not be bottoming out in the inletting and twisting as it goes in farther (the reason I suggest bedding before free-floating), or the fore end is moving as wood is removed. There may be other causes I am overlooking...

    Often the relief is needed on just one side and the opposite side opens as the freefloating is done on the other side. This where the dowel and sandpaper trick most often fails people.
    art

  12. #12
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Sir
    Thanks!

    My 15-year-old son shot a moose this past fall with the 7x57 mauser in the middle. As is, it weighs significantly less than 7#. At about 70 yards offhand he placed a Hindu dot so perfectly you could not have done better with a Sharpie resting on the forehead.
    art

  13. #13
    Member Big Al's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Palmer,Alaska
    Posts
    1,737

    Default

    I nearly started this post by listing some of the information on wood stabilization, I acquired this starting about six or seven years ago. The use of Wood life about ten to fifteen years ago fro Lou Ronniger at Black Canon shooting range. The why of French Walnut to save weight on the absorption of chemical from the vacuum process of the Stabilization process. But then I got to remembering how much time and effort I had to spend to get this information and decided not to just give it away. You spend the time and effort, I've done it now if you want to find out it's time for you to spend the effort.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  14. #14
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    I nearly started this post by listing some of the information on wood stabilization, I acquired this starting about six or seven years ago. The use of Wood life about ten to fifteen years ago fro Lou Ronniger at Black Canon shooting range. The why of French Walnut to save weight on the absorption of chemical from the vacuum process of the Stabilization process. But then I got to remembering how much time and effort I had to spend to get this information and decided not to just give it away. You spend the time and effort, I've done it now if you want to find out it's time for you to spend the effort.
    Al
    In 1978-9 I invented and developed a process for drying marginal woods and patented it. It is still used in many mills on the West coast when dealing with difficult woods. If you have much background in wood technology you will have heard of my process.

    Many have started with it as a base and improved upon it for tons of different applications.

    My father started the use of epoxy as finish and his articles were the earliest published on the subject that I know of and I have researched it quite extensively.

    I have spent a great deal of time and effort testing finishes a lot of different ways. I have spent a bunch of time with engineers for various manufacturers trying to solve various problems. I have been a paid consultant on wood stablizing research projects several times.

    There are many good old boys doing all sorts of things to stablize woods, and the concept of using epoxies designed for stopping rot as finishes is far from new. It was never a good idea because the same epoxies without the -cides have always been available. They are far from the best epoxies for stablizing wood though.

    Amazingly, the information is extremely easy to get. Specifics about the exact recipe are tough, but they will gladly supply general knowledge at the drop of a phone call....

    Sadly, Industrial Formulators in Toronto has been bought out by WEST System and the lab is no longer available for public phone calls. Their engineers were always very open and willing to help in any way they could. I was on a first name basis with most of them for a very long time.

    As to the French misunderstanding there is a whole book there without scratching the surface. Walnut for stocks is usually one of just three basic descriptions; black (American and claro), Circassian (often accepted as the best name because it is believed to have originated in Circassia), and bastogne, a mule cross of the two.

    Any one of them can produce a blank as hard and heavy as the others, but generally the California English cultivars are considered the hardest, densest, and finest pored. That means they would soak up less juice in stablizing. But defining any cultivar is tough to do.

    Bastogne is often the heaviest walnut but the pores are generally large which means there is less space for juice, but better access to that space so it tends to soak up quite a bit of juice.

    Claro, the native CA black walnut tends to be the lightest common stockmaking walnut with the largest pores, so it has capacity and access... Heavy drinker.

    Most Turkish cultivars, which are likely much closer to the parent genetics and questionable for the use of "cultivar" references, tend to be a bit lighter than the heavyweights but exceedingly fine grained and tiny-pored. They have capacity but very little access. This would be another wood that makes sense from the standpoint of limiting juice use.

    Problem is the very nature that makes it great for limited drinking makes it a great stock wood naturally.

    Wood stabliziers have come a very long way every few years for the past 20 plus. They get the stuff in there whenever and wherever they need to. I have more than passing familiarity with the various processes and systems and am more than willing to help most anyone.
    art

  15. #15

    Default

    Here are some pictures of the "primative" method of sanding out a barrel channel that I used. The stock is a high grade walnut that came with the rifle, a S&W M1500, when I purchased it about 27 years ago. I am in the process of preparing for bedding.

    I used 40 grit sandpaper and a 1/2" drill bit as a dowel since I didn't have a dowel handy and didn't feel like buy one. Idealy I would have used a 5/8ths dowel.

    You be the judge on how well it turned out.







    A folded dollar bill slides through very nicely.



    This is as far as I'm going with the sanding until the action is bedded. I just wanted to get the barrel off the forearm to bed the action. When the action is bedded I will finish sandig out the barrel channel until I have at least 1/16th of an inch clearance. Then I'll finish the sanding with 100 and 150 grit paper and then I'll Urethane Varnish or maybe epoxy it to seal it as best as I can.

  16. #16
    hap
    Guest

    Default

    Anyone without a knowledge base might buy into your method... Brings to mind the adage about BSing fans but not players...

  17. #17

    Default

    Here are some pictures of the fitted barreled action. Once again you be the judge. It looks pretty good to me. I just dont see how anyone could screw this up without being completely negligent. It's waaaaay easy and this is the third wood stock I've done it to with exactley the same results. I've also done it to a couple of synthetic stocks.

    If there is anything at all wrong with this, please point it out.










  18. #18

    Default

    I refinished this stock about 22 years ago. I came with a high gloss erethane finish that was like a signal mirror. So I stripped it down and then applied a few coats of danish to it followed by a few coats of tung oil. It's a dull satin finish but still a little too shiney for me for hunting, but nice to look at.




  19. #19

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    Anyone without a knowledge base might buy into your method... Brings to mind the adage about BSing fans but not players...
    C'mon Art... what is wrong with that floating job?

  20. #20

    Default

    [QUOTE]
    Quote Originally Posted by hap View Post
    Mark
    Not sure exactly where to start...

    I have tested hundreds of 1" cubes of walnut coated with every finish I could find under relatively controlled conditions... No reasonable application of poly short of ridiculous is actually fully waterproof, especially exterior blends.
    I agree Art. I would consider the amount needed to waterproof it to be ridiculous too. That was my subtle point. But it can be done.

    Absolutely nothing about a stock finished with epoxy says it must be glossy. Th eoil topcoat is what is seen and a little rottenstone and mineral oil applied by felt cloth will produce an eggshell luster that will not quit.
    Sounds good

    I have no idea where you get the idea epoxy is permanent. I have worked with it for many years and have done quite a bit of research with it as a finish. As to your bedding block... it is not even close to a trick to remove one and in point of fact I have removed more than several after bedding when stocks were changed.

    While wood can be removed with sandpaper and perhaps even shaped with sandpaper it is far from "workmanlike" and much too imprecise for any semblence of "Craft".
    Well I guess we have different opinions on what craft is. Think what you may, but I think my sanding jobs turned out very well and quite precise.

    Chisels below the top edge of a the barrel channel are faster, more accurate, and quite simply the "right way to remove the wood. There are a number of commercial scrapers made especially for the job. I do not particularly like them unless I am dealing with a particularly stoney piece of wood... Like most Turkish I have dealt with. They are significantly smaller than the barrel channel and are designed to remove small amounts of wood at a time.

    Reread what I posted. I did not say anything about using chisels on the surface. I said to remove the wood down in the channel LEAVING the rim alone. THEN USE A FILE to relieve the the wood along the edge and go slowly.
    Maybe you can provide us with pictures of using chisel and file. I would still NEVER recommend a beginner woodworker to take a chisel to the barrel channel of a stock.

    I fully support your absolute right to ignore good advice and screw up your projects.
    I think I screwed up pretty good... err, or should I say bad?

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •