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Thread: The modern hunter??

  1. #1
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    Red face The modern hunter??

    As the new year is upon us , and hunting methods seem to change it's ony fair that we take advantage of all the new stuff out there so here goes. First you will need a new rifle. Thats right,get rid of all those old guns no matter how many animals you have taken with them,and step into 2007.You will need a new 378 super mag., a bolt gun stainless steel with a 12 in. barrel with two muzzel brakes. Oh make sure that you get the tundra cammo heat shield face mask, this keeps you from getting burned when you fire the rifle, a must have! The ammo is made by NASSA and is a bit expensive at 39.95 a round, but has been tested on game ranches all over the world ,and is GPS guided. The rifle comes shipped in salty seaweed so they can demonstrate the effectiveness of the rifles finish! Smell lock in clothing is also a must, this locks your smell in , even after weeks in the field, and is compleatly waterproof, breathable, and comes in tundra rock, cammo and , is super UV coated. And don't forget your game sensing hat with antennae, these pick up game vibrations, caribou heard migrations and the like, and comes with a sensivity adjustment so it wont keep you awake all night.It also has a built in bear setting ,with an air raid siren with three settings. A blessed new year to all. Bill

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    Default ^^

    Funny and a nice read, very good

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    Bill,

    I know you were writing tongue in cheek, but it is an issue of concern. Check out what David Petersen has to say on this too, in his short essay, The Things we Can't Control
    Best,

  4. #4

    Default Things we can't control

    Population
    Amount of huntable land

    While I can certainly symphasize with the author of the essay as to wishing things were like they were, I have to remind us that what we have and what we would want are two separate things.
    While we may all try to achieve the ability to walk into the woods with a light backpack with 3 days worth of food and stay for 2 weeks, most of us will never be able to.
    That is not to say we don't respect the ability of someone who can.
    While we might pine for the old days we have to live in today.
    While some can afford to live in areas where they can hunt out the back door, most have to make more of an effort to hunt.
    We all are hunters, and should work at protecting our right to hunt and getting more people started hunting.
    Mike
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    Red face

    Mark, that essay is right on target. There seems to be less, and less folks showing OUR next generation of hunters the right trail, so to speak. I'll wager a guess that it won't be the sporting industry. Bill

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    Its George Jetson and his son Leroy

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Echo
    Things we can't control...
    Population
    Amount of huntable land
    Mike, what makes you think we can't control, in some way, the amount of huntable public lands? If we work now and in future to develop plans that leave a lot of public lands as wilderness that is open to hunting, isn't that "controlling" the amount of huntable land?

    We all are hunters, and should work at protecting our right to hunt and getting more people started hunting.
    I want to protect our traditions and hunting heritage too, and our privilege to hunt. Part of the problem of today is the notion that we must do all kinds of crazy new things to recruit new hunters into the fold so that we can have a larger voice against the "antis." As someone else has said: We don't need more hunters; we need better hunters!

    Bill, glad you liked the essay.
    Cheers,

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    Latest and greatest technology. Many have it, many more want it. Seems odd to me the guy using 1950s gear, like a piper supercub, is unethical, but the guy with the latest in optics, guns, clothing, etc. is the "Fair Chase" guy of the year.

    If you believe in the "one man, one vote" system of our govt, then wouldn't it follow that we do indeed, need more hunters? Or do we just need more folks that sympathize with hunting?
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    Bill,

    I know you were writing tongue in cheek, but it is an issue of concern. Check out what David Petersen has to say on this too, in his short essay, The Things we Can't Control
    Best,
    Good read, Bushrat and great thread, Longhunter.
    Too bad we often clue in on the biggest and best "stuff" and miss the real issues confonting the present and future hunter.
    Ethics and fair chase principles arent hanging on the discount rack at Cabela's. Nothing that important and worth instilling is ever that easy.


    Frank

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    Talking Back on topic...

    Every modern hunter needs one of these....





    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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    Wink

    Snyd, where can I get one? How much is shipping? Do they still come with the free cammo umbrella?? Bill.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LongHunter7 View Post
    Snyd, where can I get one? How much is shipping? Do they still come with the free cammo umbrella?? Bill.
    Ya but the machine gun is optional....

    http://www.army-technology.com/contr.../vehicles/atv/
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  13. #13
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    Default Needs

    [QUOTE=bushrat;

    Part of the problem of today is the notion that we must do all kinds of crazy new things to recruit new hunters into the fold so that we can have a larger voice against the "antis." As someone else has said: We don't need more hunters; we need better hunters!


    Obviously I have way to much time on my hands or I would`nt be lurking around here piping off.

    Your comments and the essay got me thinking about myself and motives and what the modern hunter needs. I grew up in a family with a long tradition of hunting and outdoors activity. My great grandfather worked at a famous hunting camp in Montana. My father and uncles hunted every chance they had and took us kids out every time they could. Durring the off seasons every Sunday was spent making bullets, loading and testing rounds at the backyard hillside range. (Plus cutting 2 pickup loads off wood) They taught us outdoor values that had been passed to them and there was never a rush to the hunt or home from it. I hunted ducks in the nieghborhood after school and did overnight weekend campouts with my buddies. We never brought home much meat but we never got in any trouble at it either. We had been taught good values and we had places we could go.
    The old nieghborhood got pretty crowded and the swamp got drained. I got married had 2 sons and was too busy with my career to do much hunting. I never gave my sons the oppertunities I had and there was no place left in the old nieghborhood for them to go on thier own. My sons are good hard working men now with strong moral values (both work the deks of crab boats) but they are not hunters and its my fault.
    I was able to reestablish myself as a hunter and move to one of the most pristine and abundant hunting ares there is because I had money and luck and I vowed to share what I have and not over exploit it.
    This fall I rented one of my cabins to a fellow from Nikiski who brought his 2 sons and nephew down for their first deer hunt. They did`nt bring a lot of fancy stuff and they stayed for 2 weeks. We became close friends and they will be back whether or not I am able to continue renting cabins. This fellow had the patience of Jobe. Each kid got individual days until they had all gotten thier deer. He taught them every aspect of the hunt including maticulas care of the meat. These kids are NOT the ones who have shot up every road sign in Alaska (a real pieve of mine).
    What every GOOD modern hunter in Alaska needs is to take the initiative to pass on his ethical skills wheather it be meat hunting or trophy hunting, to someone to carry on the tradition. I failed at this and because of it there are 2 less good hunters in Alaska and I have lost a good place for hunters needing a good place to go.

  14. #14

    Default Ain't making any more

    land Bushrat. Personally I think we have all the wilderness designated land here that we need. Millions of acres aren't enough? We need to keep our current undesignated public land as it is - undesignated so we don't get locked out.
    Mike
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    The same reasoning/point of view in the above referenced article can be applied to our entire western culture. Do we NEED all the modern conveniences that we have in order to stay alive? No. But, we have invented things to help make our lives easier. I use the term "easier" loosely because in so doing we have added new levels of complexity in our lives that at times are just ridiculous. Computers are a good example. In many ways they make it much easier to manage data. But in adopting this technology we also adopt a tremendous amount of complexity AND an unhealthy dependance on the technology.

    In the lower 48 it is much easier for a "city dweller" to grab his gun, bullets, knife, spam sandwich and thermos of coffie and go deer hunting for a day than it is for most of us in Alaska. I know, I did it for many years. But, it's a big production for the most part to go hunting up here. Granted, I have jumped in the truck with my rifle and knife, driven up the highway and happened across a bull but it doesn't happen that often and that's not how I like to hunt. I'd rather go out for a week.

    David Petersen in the article says:
    "I am saying that none such expensive toys are necessary for a good, safe, and successful hunt, and that often such stuff serves primarily to encumber us, slow us down, steal our traveling money, and generally interfere with achieving happy and satisfying ends."

    I disagree with him here. This may be true in places like Indiana where you can grab your rifle or bow and walk down the road and shoot a whitetail in the woods next to the cornfield. If it starts raining no prob. Home is just up the road. But in Alaska it's a different ball game as we all know. We DO need various types of vehicles to get us to the hunting areas, modern clothing and gear is just plain better than some of the older stuff and can save your life like an EPIRB or Sat phone. Most of don't live in the bush. Even then you still need some sort of transport. I'm a city dweller, I use my van, trailer, atv, my feet, modern boots, polyester/wool clothing, hightech tent, synthetic sleeping bag, etc. These things allow me to get where I want to go, care for myself while I'm there and get home safely. They do not "serve to primarily encumber me, slow me down, steal my traveling money, or generally interfere with me achieving happy and satisfying ends." Now, if I didn't have these things then I would be encumbered, slowed down, have no way to travel, and it would interfere with me acheiving happy and satisfying ends.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

  16. #16

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    Well said Snyd.
    Mike
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    There is a faster way off the mountain, might hurt a little though.

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    Wink fessing up

    Just for the record, I wear sneakers, drive a gas powered suv, and have been known to use guns that use smokeless powder!! I'm so ashamed! All kidding aside, I love to hear stories that involve family hunts. As someone pointed out,time is short spend some with your kids outdoors.Bill.

  18. #18

    Thumbs up 2 cents more...

    Great thread and hilarious sarcasm...
    I also use some modern connivances GPS instead of my ole lensatic compass (ok I lied the GPS rarely comes out unless I am really lost, although my synthetic sleeping bag is really nice). But what I wanted to add is I believe in anonymous1's post... it is our responsibility to pass on a pride in those coming up behind us without hunting aids like radar and heat seeking missiles.
    It saddens me I didn't come to Alaska as a younger man and share some of my experiences here with my son. He learned to hunt in Texas where there was rarely a need to work hard at hunting, and I think that made him a less conscientious hunter, no less a man though. Without the next generation taking pride in hunting we will soon be without a place to hunt despite having millions of acres.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by rivercat View Post
    Without the next generation taking pride in hunting we will soon be without a place to hunt despite having millions of acres.
    You're right about that.
    A gun is like a parachute. If you need one, and donít have one, youíll probably never need one again

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