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Thread: Motors Up or Down?

  1. #1

    Default Motors Up or Down?

    While towing what's the best position for the outboards. Up tough on hydraulic ram? Down tough on props?

    Louie

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If your trailer allows the engine to be kept down w/o the skeg grinding on the ground (highly unlikely) that would be the best position.

    In reality most everyone has to transport their boat with the motor up, and you'll need some sort of transom saver to reduce the stress on the hull and the hydraulics. I use a 4X4 blocked under my engine to keep the weight off the lift.

  3. #3
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    down on everything for me unless supported or going a shorter distance on an easy road with no bumps.

  4. #4

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    Transom Saver, saves motor hydraulics and prevents twisting effect on transom.

    Piece of hose and a velcro tie, keeps motor steering centered.


  5. #5

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    the only outboard i got is a tunnel jet so i do not tip it up and i always turn it so that the steering ram is in so dust and stuff done get on it and strap it up so it does not move been

  6. #6
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    also if you have a high pickup or something you can get a drop hitch and lower the front which raises the motor possibly more than enough to have plenty of clearance on both ends. that is the best solution if it works for you.

  7. #7
    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    The trailer for my catamaran allows me to have my motors down at all times.
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    Boatless

  8. #8
    Member FISHFACE's Avatar
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    and one from the rear
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    Boatless

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    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    So I have a 150hp Honda on the back on my Ocean Pro. It has the metal tab that you flip down to lock the motor in the up position. Is this enough to take the strain off the hydraulics? I have to haul it in the up position as it would drag the skeg.

    Also, I read somewhere, I thought on this forum, that a transom saver was actually a bad idea. The bar put too much pressure on the cross member of the trailer and could cause trailer fatigue and failure. Is this not he case?

    Here's the link to the thread I was talking about. http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...=transom+saver. What about the wedges folks are talking about in that same thread?

  10. #10
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    if your trailor wont allow you to run with it all the way down i would go with somthing like johnsboat has set up that should take alot of stress off the transom and keep bouncing to a minimum.

  11. #11

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    here is another vote for the transom saver that Jonsboat posted. Works great! I like the hose/velcro idea on the steering cable. Good tip.

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    So I have a 150hp Honda on the back on my Ocean Pro. It has the metal tab that you flip down to lock the motor in the up position. Is this enough to take the strain off the hydraulics? I have to haul it in the up position as it would drag the skeg.

    Also, I read somewhere, I thought on this forum, that a transom saver was actually a bad idea. The bar put too much pressure on the cross member of the trailer and could cause trailer fatigue and failure. Is this not he case?

    Here's the link to the thread I was talking about. http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...=transom+saver. What about the wedges folks are talking about in that same thread?
    The flip down tab I believe is a safety latch for servicing.

    Your owner’s manual will give recommendations for trailering but as the instructions say it is for the preservation of the motor.

    The motor manufacturer does not address stress on the transom and I haven't seen boat manufacturers address trailering other then position of the boat on the trailer.

    The picture I posted on #4 is a Yamaha 150 and a Suzuki 9.9 on a 220 ocean pro. I trailer it 500 mi 1 way to camp and have not had any damage.

    As a suggestion, put your motor on the flip down tab, jerk downward on the bottom of the motor to simulate a pot hole and see what flexes. Then support the bottom of the motor to the trailer frame with a 2X4 and run the test again.

  13. #13
    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    Its good advice and I'll try it out. But...as you've probably heard folks from AK say, the roads up here make the worst of them down there, look like a high speed expressway. I hate saying its tougher in AK but when it comes to the roads, they are terrible. Lots of frost heaves, pot holes, crap, etc. Anyway, my point is, put the stress on the boat or stress on the trailer. My first impression is the trailer is way cheaper than the boat. Then again, if the trailer gives out on the highway, I lose the who kit and kaboodle.

    So back to my question. What's the right way to trailer my boat. Engine in the up position on the metal lever that comes on it. Or, on a transom saver. No agenda here. Just want to know what is the best way to minmize stress on my boat.

  14. #14

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    Since I could not find a recommendation from the trailer manufacturer or the boat manufacturer on how the motor should be trailered I took the "keep the motor steering centered" from the motor manufacturer, the "keep the load off the lift cylinder" from the motor manufacturer and transferred the twisting load to the rear cross member of the trailer which I think is missing from the equation.

    For your concern about the trailer, the bracket the transom saver bar uses at the trailer is much lighter then the trailer cross member, it has not bent so I think the cross member is OK.

  15. #15

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    I went through this thought process in '03 with my 130 Honda's and the flip down lever.

    I went out to my motors at that time and used the manual bypass valvle on the leg and cycled the motor through the range of motion by hand. First I started with the motor down and coming up through the range of distance were the transom saver mechanisms would put it at, the motor was darn heavy in the hand and I could really influence my trailer bounce(tongue weight) with very little effort. Taking the motor to full up, it became very light and easy to do when the in the last range of motion where my flip down lever would come into play. Plus I had very little influence over the bounce of the trailer/tongue weight. It is easy for me to see what is happening at the tongue also as I have an articulating mount on my truck.

    At that time I decided to go full up and on the tab and with the load off the cylinder and after 7 seasons of heavy towing the cylinders on both motors to date are doing well. If I was to buy something more I would use the device that slips around the lift cylinders shaft and sit on that rather than the stock flip down ears. The steering shaft wrap to keep centered is a great addition as well IMHO.

  16. #16
    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    So I have a 150hp Honda on the back on my Ocean Pro. It has the metal tab that you flip down to lock the motor in the up position. Is this enough to take the strain off the hydraulics? I have to haul it in the up position as it would drag the skeg.

    Also, I read somewhere, I thought on this forum, that a transom saver was actually a bad idea. The bar put too much pressure on the cross member of the trailer and could cause trailer fatigue and failure. Is this not he case?
    I have the same support on my Honda 90, the dealer said to use it when transporting on trailer. They also said all the boats they sell go out with the motors up with the flip down locks engaged. Also, I’ve been told when you have the motor tipped all the way up it actually rides better because all the weight of the motor is right over the transom; this makes sense. My boat and motor have made two trips over the Alaska Highway and countless trips around Alaska with the motors up, no problems. Those flip down tabs are extremely stout.
    Jay
    07 C-Dory 25 Cruiser
    OurPlayground.


  17. #17

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    Yamaha posted a service bulletin last year about trailering using the flip down block. I can't find the bulletin but recall it recommending to not use it for trailering. They recommend this product.

    http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outboard.../0/detail.aspx

  18. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hewey 260 View Post
    Yamaha posted a service bulletin last year about trailering using the flip down block. I can't find the bulletin but recall it recommending to not use it for trailering. They recommend this product.

    http://www.yamaha-motor.com/outboard.../0/detail.aspx
    It's the last paragraph of the bulletin in the link you posted.

  19. #19
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    i use a transom saver on my 200 and have had no problems even pulled it up from wa botom was jacked when i got here but motor and transome were fine

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