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Thread: McMILLAN Stocks

  1. #1
    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Default McMILLAN Stocks

    http://www.mcmfamily.com/

    The question of stocks pops up on this forum frequently and McMillan's name is mentioned quite a bit. One of the more common complaints that I have read about is the time required to build a custom stock.

    Today I drove up to the factory and dropped a deposit on a custom build TAC 338 Lapua and picked out all the custom features that are of interest to me.

    One thing that I was told while going over my build plan was that their custom orders on stocks is down to a 2-2.5 month build time. They had been backed up to a 4-5 months build time most of last year due to military commitments.

    If anyone has put off ordering a custom McMillan stock because of time constraints now would be a good time to get a order in. I ordered a green, black and tan marble swirl in the A-5 with a thumb wheel adjustable cheek piece. That adjustment system is different than their standard A-5 stock but changes are part of what make each stock unique.

    The total build time in my rifle package is 4 months, that's two months faster than an equivalent rifle a good friend had built last year. This friend also accompanied me the the factory today and dropped a deposit on another TAC model to complement his TAC 338. His new rifle will be chambered in 6.5mmX47mm Lapua. This rifle will be built on their TAC 308 platform with a 1:8 twist and a 24" barrel.

    I became hooked on the TAC 338 Lapua last week after attending a 2 day class taught by Ryan McMillan. He covered basics in long range shooting, he's a former Navy Seal sniper. I was able to successfully hit targets out to 1070 yards with a TAC 338 Lapua that I borrowed from the above mention friend.

    I look forward to taking delivery of my own TAC 338 in June and taking advanced long range courses offered by Ryan.

  2. #2

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    I have never had the opportunity to see a McMillan stock in person. I have always heard everyone say that they are the best. But my skeptical nature makes me wonder are they really worth twice the money of another fiberglass stock not to mention the previously stated lead time.

    So what is it about a McMillan that makes them so much better than say a Bell&Carlson?

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    Quote Originally Posted by evandailey View Post
    So what is it about a McMillan that makes them so much better than say a Bell&Carlson?
    With just a bit of exaggeration, everything about them makes them better than a B&C. I own both, but I'll not buy another B&C. Presently my 6.5X55 (Hunters Edge), 300 WM (Ruger R), 35 Whelen (Remington Sporter) all reside in McMillan stocks. I've owned other synthetic handles (MPI, Lonewolf, HS, B&C), but the McMillan is absolutely top shelf.

    FWIW, I just received another McMillan stock in the mail this week. It is a Supergrade stock for my Win Mod 70 416 RM--took right at 12 weeks for delivery. It is 70% black and 30% olive with a Limb Saver pad at 14.25 LOP. It is a drop in fit, but I'll Acraglas it later this week. I admit they are a bit pricey, though in truth they are within a few dollars ($50-$75) of other quality synthetic stocks once everything is said and done. I couldn't be better satisfied with its fit or finish and it arrived just in time for spring bear season.

  4. #4

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    As a guy who tries diligently to be conscious of how the man upstairs would have me spend my money, I just can't see spending half what I had in my whole custom rifle on just a stock. Maybe one day I'll handle one and it'll change my mind, but spending ANY money on guns usually involves a moral dilemma for me as bad as I hate to admit it.

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    With a quick tour of the factory it's amazing to see what goes in to the production.

    The molds are hand filled with material of choice, fiber glass or carbon fiber. The epoxy resins/colors are filled by hand based on your choice or just clear if you pick a painted surface. The fill is hand packed based on caliber or recoil requirements. If you have a balance in mind they can adjust fill quantity, mass or location to accommodate your preference.

    In my application three different fills are used in the forend, receiver area and butt to achieve proper balance and reinforce the action to handle the 338 Lapua Magnum recoil.

    The stocks are machined in a jig to accommodate whatever action you desire. The barrel channel is cut to your barrel contour for a custom fit. A line of workers handles each task individually to perfection before it passes to the next.

    Once the stock in my application is completed it will make a trip to the rifle building and be mated to my barreled action with a bedding job that is second to none. After the rifle is test fired it will be disassemble and all parts will get coated and the stock finished for delivery.

    Attention to detail is outstanding. I too have a B&C stock on a 204 Ruger and thought it was the cats meow. About the only thing I like about that stock is the palm swell.

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    Quote Originally Posted by evandailey View Post
    As a guy who tries diligently to be conscious of how the man upstairs would have me spend my money, I just can't see spending half what I had in my whole custom rifle on just a stock. Maybe one day I'll handle one and it'll change my mind, but spending ANY money on guns usually involves a moral dilemma for me as bad as I hate to admit it.
    I had to think long and hard about the package, many sleepless nights like wanting that first bicycle as a kid. I sold an American Spirit Arms AR-15 .308 Side Charger and a dirt bike. That transferred cash from 2 toys into 1 better toy in my mind.

    You just have to do what makes you happy and this rifle makes me happy.

    I was simply letting others know that the build time has been dramatically reduced and the quality is amazing.

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    Quote Originally Posted by evandailey View Post
    As a guy who tries diligently to be conscious of how the man upstairs would have me spend my money, I just can't see spending half what I had in my whole custom rifle on just a stock. Maybe one day I'll handle one and it'll change my mind, but spending ANY money on guns usually involves a moral dilemma for me as bad as I hate to admit it.
    I appreciate and applaud your commitment to wise stewardship. That is a sorely lacking discipline among too many people IME. However, spending more money does not necessarily imply that a person is being frivolous or a poor steward. I believe that a good case can be made that buying the superior product is a better investment of limited resources. I am not trying to convince you what is best to do with your money, but the difference in a finished B&C stock and a McMillan are dramatic. Have you priced a finished McMillan? Depending on your order you should be in for $450-$525 for a delivered stock. I've not bought a B&C in a while, but years ago the cost was $225 delivered IIRC and it took quite a bit of work to get it to fit properly.

    As far as the moral dilemma, again I understand and agree with your perspective. For my part I have only one hobby, firearms--particularly rifles. I work hard, with varying degrees of success, at maintaining a sense of moderation in my hobby. While there are many reasons to purchase firearms, one that I keep in front of me is they are an investment that will provide some return. I've rifles I bought 20 years ago that will bring a 100% or more return on my initial investment (try that with a car you drive everyday) and have provided countless hours of pleasure in the meanwhile. Try that with most other hobbies and I dare say you'll not find that to be the case. I am not discounting your concerns, but spending more on certain occasions does not mean a person is a poor steward or that he is playing haphazardly with His money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    ...but spending more on certain occasions does not mean a person is a poor steward or that he is playing haphazardly with His money.

    I totally agree with that and am not unwilling to pay for quality. Like I said I haven't seen a McMillan in person, sounds like I need to.

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    I believe that a good case can be made that buying the superior product is a better investment of limited resources.
    with guns, ammo and optics...thats the truth!
    Ken
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  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    With just a bit of exaggeration, everything about them makes them better than a B&C. I own both, but I'll not buy another B&C.
    Interetsing... Why wouldn't you buy another one? When did you last buy a B&C and what model was it? Years ago, B&C stocks were a bt on the cheap side, but the ones I've recently handled on Cooper Rifles seem to be very high quality. They were basically the equivilent of the Medalist with aluminum bedding block.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MontanaRifleman View Post
    Interetsing... Why wouldn't you buy another one? When did you last buy a B&C and what model was it? Years ago, B&C stocks were a bt on the cheap side, but the ones I've recently handled on Cooper Rifles seem to be very high quality. They were basically the equivilent of the Medalist with aluminum bedding block.
    My B&C is a Medalist from 5 or 6 years ago. There are numerous problems with my stock (and I've seen it in others as well), but primarily my issues stem from a weak forend that flexes excessively with any tension on the sling stud and an aluminum bedding block that had extremely poor inletting. The stock was returned to B&C and cleared their QC department a second time so I know it is not what they consider an anomaly. The inletting was so poor that the bolt handle would move more than 1/8 of an inch and strike the back of the bolt cut out under recoil. I fully bedded the action and cured that ailment (a supposed unnecessary step that voids the warranty), but the material the stock is constructed out of is not stiff enough IMO and the forearm can be twisted with only a firm grip. I suspect that this lack of stiffness in materials is the reason that a bedding block is necessary for acceptable accuracy in the Medalist line. I understand that several manufacturers are using this stock now: i.e Weatherby, Remington, Winchester to name a few. It is certainly better than the run of the mill injection molded stock, but comparing it to a quality hand laid stock the Medalist is an inferior product and design. That may change, but I'll not buy nor own another B&C. YMMV.

  12. #12

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    I have owned 2 McMillian and 3 B&C stocks. I put another McMillian stock on my Custom Mark V 340Wby and for a reason. The McMillian is a better stock in my opinion. Now that said, I do like my B&C stocks, they worked fine for the customs I had built using them.
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  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1Cor15:19 View Post
    My B&C is a Medalist from 5 or 6 years ago. There are numerous problems with my stock (and I've seen it in others as well), but primarily my issues stem from a weak forend that flexes excessively with any tension on the sling stud and an aluminum bedding block that had extremely poor inletting. The stock was returned to B&C and cleared their QC department a second time so I know it is not what they consider an anomaly. The inletting was so poor that the bolt handle would move more than 1/8 of an inch and strike the back of the bolt cut out under recoil. I fully bedded the action and cured that ailment (a supposed unnecessary step that voids the warranty), but the material the stock is constructed out of is not stiff enough IMO and the forearm can be twisted with only a firm grip. I suspect that this lack of stiffness in materials is the reason that a bedding block is necessary for acceptable accuracy in the Medalist line. I understand that several manufacturers are using this stock now: i.e Weatherby, Remington, Winchester to name a few. It is certainly better than the run of the mill injection molded stock, but comparing it to a quality hand laid stock the Medalist is an inferior product and design. That may change, but I'll not buy nor own another B&C. YMMV.
    Interesting again. The Cooper stocks were very stiff and rigid, about the same as the HS stocks on my Senderos which can not be twisted by hand with someone of average strength. Not surprisingly, there are of course two camps on the aluminum bedding block design. I like tehm, and they seem to work great for me and a bunch of other Sendero shooters - not to say that stocks without beddding blocks don't work great either.

    On bedding stocks, I think it's a good idea and I finally got the courage to do my Sendero stocks (thread to come sometime in the future). So if I got a B&C or McMillan, I would bed it regardless.

    I can understand your disposition to shun B&C products based onyour experience. I've been there with another manufarturer myself.

    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    I have owned 2 McMillian and 3 B&C stocks. I put another McMillian stock on my Custom Mark V 340Wby and for a reason. The McMillian is a better stock in my opinion. Now that said, I do like my B&C stocks, they worked fine for the customs I had built using them.
    I figured McMillans were probably a higher quality construction and material. They get premium prices and have long waitin g times so I think that says something, besides having heard and read nothing but good things about them.

    Did you experience the same problems 1Cor had with his B&C Medalist with the forearm flexing and poor inletting? And the question isn't meant to question 1Cor's experience. I believe his account. I'm just wondering if B&C QC might be improving.

  14. #14

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    No, I did not experience the problems he had with the B&C stocks but I only buy the Medalist made by B&C.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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    Quote Originally Posted by beartooth View Post
    No, I did not experience the problems he had with the B&C stocks but I only buy the Medalist made by B&C.

    If anybody thinks they need to only have one brand of stock, they are only kidding themselves. Both have there place from the cheapest to the vary highest priced. I'm sure not recommending to anybody send out there old O3A3 to McMillan's and spend that kind of Money for a stock. It's the same for the guy that has a custom action that has had a custom made barrel install by a top barrel fitter that uses the best methods to chamber and fits the barrel. Has a high end scope fitted and installed to that rifle to buy the cheapest stock he can find. for shoot the cheapest ammo he can find "on sale". For the guy that can't get the best accuracy out of the rifle he can I don't try to talk him into any thing he can't get out of the rifle. I have known a lot of people who haven't been able to get any more out of a rifle than what the shelf has to offer, and still wonder why they wanted to spend another dime on what the factory had to offer.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    If anybody thinks they need to only have one brand of stock, they are only kidding themselves. Both have there place from the cheapest to the vary highest priced. . .
    I never intimated that different stocks do not have a place, but the question was
    So what is it about a McMillan that makes them so much better than say a Bell&Carlson?
    My comments were upon the comparison of B&C with McMillan. While it's obvious B&C has significant market share and therefor a place at the table for many gun owners and manufacturers, they (B&C) are in no way comparable to the quality of a McMillan, or a host of other manufacturers for that matter. I readily agree with you Big Al that among shooters there is a disproportionate focus upon equipment--always has been and likely always will be IMO.

  17. #17

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    I have 6 lightweight rifles with McMillan Edge Mountain Rifle stocks. In my opinion, they are the best stocks out there for mountain hunter here in AK. Very tough, light, and my rifles shoot very well when wearing them.

  18. #18

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    I like all the stocks on all my rifles, because all my rifles shoot great.
    A GUN WRITER NEEDS:
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