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Thread: Hare tanning

  1. #1
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    Default Hare tanning

    I've accumulated a selection of hare hides with the hopes of trying my hand at home tanning with the kids but have been told the skin is too thin for tanning.

    Just wanted some feedback prior to wasting my time or throwing them away. Curious what is different between hare and rabbit skins? Has anybody had any success tanning or making any useful products from hares?

    Thanks,

  2. #2
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Don't bother

    Rabbit = thick. More difficult to skin.
    Hare = thin. The hide can be ripped, and the fur can just be pulled out.

    Maybe look for an arrogant bunny who is thick skinned... the kind who dares you to shoot.

  3. #3
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default

    the great basins tribes depended very heavily on jackrabbits, which are hares, and they would twist the hides and plait them into blankets.
    i think it took 100 hides to make a mans blanket.
    as far as a tanned pelt, they are like paper with hair on it.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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  4. #4
    Member sharksinthesalsa's Avatar
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    Default good luck

    tell us how it turns out and what you used....i have had pretty good success in skinning hares for hides....but i usually just let my beagle tear it up or ill make a toy for her out of it...which she will destroy so that i have to go hunting and get a new one....i cut around the head and cut around each foot...then with my fingers get the skin to release from around the neck and get it started down the body a little then pull it of most of the times only the feet i cut and the tail and scrotum are left....sometimes i get the scrotum and the tail peeled out too..of course this is best achieved when the animal is is still warm..like right when you shoot it warm
    "early to bed, early to rise, fish like hell, and make up lies"

  5. #5
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    I have tanned them before and they turned out fine. I took my time skinning them as to not make any holes, and bought a tanning kit through cabelas. I have had them out in my hunting room for over a year now and they still look the same as when I tanned them. The hardest part was drying the fur at the end, I used my wife's hairdryer and worked the fur with my fingertips until it was fluffy, took about 45 minutes per hide.

  6. #6
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Usage

    I suppose it depends on what you are going to do with a hide. Anything can be tanned I suppose, but a hare skin will still have fur than can easily be pulled out because there is very little root for it. If all you were going to do was to hang it on the wall, there isn't even any need to tan it. But to use it for any sewing or even to handle seems like a lot of work for a fragile hide which will shed like crazy. The blankets of which Dave spoke were also made by Athabaskans of Alaska and they were well documented as having filled the rooms and people's faces with shed hair. Yuk!

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