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Thread: Looking for high quality stainless steel .45 caliber semi-auto handgun

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    Default Looking for high quality stainless steel .45 caliber semi-auto handgun

    Hi. I learned of this site from a friend. I am looking for recommendations on a high quality stainless steel .45 caliber semi-auto handgun. I've never owned a semi-auto; only a stainless steel .357 Ruger SP101. Since I've never owned one and don't know much about them, please consider my ignorance if you care to enlighten me on what you think a good choice would be! I've read some other posts on the handgun threads and must confess they are over my head. I live in western Montana and would like something with a little more stopping power and rate of fire should I have an unfortunate run-in with an aggressive grizzly. I also prefer a larger magazine. Thanks in advance for any advice you care to share.

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    Default Observation

    Many people in Alaska carry handguns for protection again 2 and 4 legged wild life.

    In the woods stainless guns are very popular but you seldon see anyone with an automatic. Stainless .44 mags are the norm and go up from there to the .454s, 460s, 480s, 500s etc.

    Forget the automatic and go for a revolver esp since you already have one. There just really isn't an automatic that most people would consider as adequate a large caliber revolver esp. for a new shooter.
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Believe I'll take the 357 over the 45acp for bear protection.That said if you want all metal look at the 1911 platform

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    Where are you at in western Montana? I was born and raised in that country and lived there until I was 32. I never had any reason to carry a handgun for griz. Not too many there unless your in the Missions, the Bob or Glacier. You're more apt to run into a Mtn Lion than a griz. I just got off the phone with my ol huntin buddy in Missoula and he said the wolves are what are getting really bad. If I were headed into the woods in Montana and were going to carry a handgun I'd be perfectly fine with a 357 I could shoot well.

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    under your perameters I would recommend a glock. If you choose to upgrade the slide to a stainless version, Lone Wolf makes them as well as stainless barrels. I would opt for the 10mm over the .45acp. I have never owned a 1911 style weapon, so no help there. Although I hear Taurus's version is very nice and with all the options stock, at a great price.

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    Default If you're hearts set on a stainless semi-auto you might want to check these out...

    If you're set on a .45 semi-auto in stainless there are tons of choices available in the 1911 platform, but if you want something in that same range as the .357 magnum only in a semi-auto you may want to do some looking at some 10mm's. If you want more than that in a 1911 platform then theres the .460 Rowland you could look at as well.

    Neither option puts you up there in the "big boy" range of the high powered modern handguns out there. But you will be solidly in similar territory of the .357 mag if you settle on a 10mm, and very close to the .44 magnum if you go with a .460 Rowland. Ain't it great to have choices!

    In the 10mm stainless 1911 semi-auto catagorie you could look at the Colt Delta's, the Kimber Eclipse, Dan Wesson makes a couple models, so does Smith and Wesson, the old AMT, and many of the higher end manufacturers offer them as well, Wilson, Nighthawk, Heritage, and so on.

    I like the glocks too, and own a few of them, but I understand the love for the classic 1911 all too well!

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    I would never trust a semi-auto anything with my life for bear protection. In the event of a jam (and I shoot competitively so I have cleared a few under pressure) the bear will get to you if you haven't killed it before the jam. Also .45 is not enough punch. It's designed for people and little else. People are relatively frail animals.

    .357 mag and up is the way to go for bear protection. Revolvers don't jam and in the event of a failure to fire you pull the trigger and another round moves in, no clearing the gun, no realizing it didn't go off, just pull the trigger till the bear falls, you fall, or the gun runs out of ammo.

    Also, if the bear is close enough to charge you it's coming fast and without much warning, assuming you saw it before it started charging, you are only getting maybe 2 shots if you're really fast. I have known several people who have shot bears with .44s in charges and they killed the bear in one shot, the first shot, if they killed it and didn't make it mad. Capacity won't save you, accuracy will. Get a good revolver and practice. Hundreds of rounds kind of practice.... Unless you prefer to be the next bear chow I read about in the paper.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snyd View Post
    Where are you at in western Montana? I was born and raised in that country and lived there until I was 32. I never had any reason to carry a handgun for griz. Not too many there unless your in the Missions, the Bob or Glacier. You're more apt to run into a Mtn Lion than a griz. I just got off the phone with my ol huntin buddy in Missoula and he said the wolves are what are getting really bad. If I were headed into the woods in Montana and were going to carry a handgun I'd be perfectly fine with a 357 I could shoot well.
    Hey Snyd. I live near Missoula, but get around lots of places hiking, etc. I've only seen griz from a long distance, and have no intention of ever shooting one. I'd try everything else, including bear spray first. But, you never know... I'd rather be packin' just in case. Yeah, I've heard lots of stories about the lions. And more lately about wolves. I'm very comfortable with the SP101, but I'd like something a little bigger with more rounds available. The SP101 is only five rounds. Anything I get, I will spend many hours practicing with. Guess I'm just ready for something new. Need an excuse to spend some money!

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    If you just need a new gun look hard at the S&W 10mm in SS

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    Stick with a revolver for in the woods and purchase a semi for carrying in town. If your comfortable with a 357, stick with and get a S&W 327 in 357 it has 8rds and is da or sa...

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    Revolvers don't jam and in the event of a failure to fire you pull the trigger and another round moves in, no clearing the gun, no realizing it didn't go off, just pull the trigger till the bear falls, you fall, or the gun runs out of ammo.
    Fill one full of dirt, they sure do. Have a handload jump a crimp and they sure do.
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    A revolver has as many openings to fill with dirt as a semi-auto. As for getting it done in ruff conditions both have proved themselfs in all of our wars and I would think at least 95% semi-auto the last thirty years anyway. The revolver it is easier to try a second fire on a shell that didn't go off but by then its over anyway

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    I get a laugh at the thought of people being afraid to use a quality semi due to unreliability issues. I have seen 100's of police officers carrying semi auto's over the year and every one of them is at least 1000x's more likely have to use it in an emergency than any of us in the woods! If they are so unreliable then why are they the standard for almost every police officer and soldier in the world?
    If I pull the trigger on my 44 redhawk it goes bang, up to 6 times in a row. If I pull the trigger on my 10mm it consistently goes bang up to 15x.

    For a high capacity do-it-all semi auto I second the Glock 10mm. I really want a 460 rowland myself but you need to KNOW you can get ammo for it before you go that way unless you reload and I am guessing that the OP does not.

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I get a laugh at the thought of people being afraid to use a quality semi due to unreliability issues. I have seen 100's of police officers carrying semi auto's over the year and every one of them is at least 1000x's more likely have to use it in an emergency than any of us in the woods! If they are so unreliable then why are they the standard for almost every police officer and soldier in the world?
    If I pull the trigger on my 44 redhawk it goes bang, up to 6 times in a row. If I pull the trigger on my 10mm it consistently goes bang up to 15x.
    True-nugh, but . . . what they are acutely talking about (if they know what they are talking about and not just talking) is disciplined training. All guns have some level of malfunctions and with an auto you make a trade of more fire power for a more complex malfunction drill. There are more kinds of malfunctions in an auto than a revolver and 2 drills to keep up on in case you have a malfunction. The normal drill of <slap, rack, aim, press> and the stove pipe drill of <slap, rack, aim, press, still no go, drop mag, clear, insert mag, rack, aim, press> are both needed for an auto. A revolvers malfunction drill is <aim, press> and that’s it.

    So it takes a lot more work to adequately handle a malfunction in an auto and they are slightly more likely to have them than a revolver due to all the extra stuff that goes on in them. Take the auto away from the disciplined, well trained, check, clean, inspect, drill, drill some more, and qualify world of the professorial users and malfunction rates increase dramatically as the user’s ability to handle them is reduced. Revolver malfunction rates also increase but to a much lower extent and the user needs almost no training to handle them.

    As a guy that loves to shoot, tinker with, clean, inspect, handle, and pet guns I have great trust in my autos to go bang when I want or need them to. However I can’t tell you how many times I have watched guys bump the mag release at the range than fumble around without a clue what’s wrong with their gun or how to fix it . . . they need some disciplined training or a revolver. It’s not the action type so much as the nut behind the action that makes autos less reliable than revolvers.
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    I appreciate all the replies. I'm learning a lot. Thanks.

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    I agree with you Andy. Honestly in a bear defense situation I doubt that you will see the opportunity to clear a malfunction in either weapon. It needs to go bang on the first squeeze of the trigger. A double action revolver does have an advantage that another squeeze of the trigger brings an entirely new round into battery instead of having to rack the slide. For me though I just take care of my 10mm and so far when I squeeze the go lever it goes boom and repeats with each subsequent pull until the mag is empty and the slide is locked back. I have no reason to believe that it wouldn't perform in exactly that manner in a defensive situation. The improved comfort while packing of the slim auto design and the fact that it is simply a blast to shoot means I am both more likely to carry it and more likely to practice with it!

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    I agree with you Andy. Honestly in a bear defense situation I doubt that you will see the opportunity to clear a malfunction in either weapon. It needs to go bang on the first squeeze of the trigger. A double action revolver does have an advantage that another squeeze of the trigger brings an entirely new round into battery instead of having to rack the slide. For me though I just take care of my 10mm and so far when I squeeze the go lever it goes boom and repeats with each subsequent pull until the mag is empty and the slide is locked back. I have no reason to believe that it wouldn't perform in exactly that manner in a defensive situation. The improved comfort while packing of the slim auto design and the fact that it is simply a blast to shoot means I am both more likely to carry it and more likely to practice with it!
    LuJon, can you please tell me the brand, model, etc. of the 10mm you carry? Is it stainless? If not, does your model also come in a stainless version? I'd like to get whatever details I can on your weapon, please. Thanks.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Here is my favorite 10mm, most of the time I'm packing this or a 460V and if I have my coat a 357 J frame.
    EAA/Tanfoglio Witiness Match 10mm
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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I had forgot about the Witness.They are fine guns and run very smooth and its a proven design.

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    I also have a witness with their "wonder finish" it does look nice but is certainly not stainless as I learned quickly on my trip to Kodiak last year. Mine is currently getting dura-coated!
    They do offer them in stainless though but only in their elite series from what I can tell. They also have a "hunter" which comes with a 6" barrel in either 45acp or 10mm but it appears to be blued or w/ some other dark finish. While I am still a 1911 fan I can't argue that the CZ75B is just a sweet design, it breaks down easier, has a higher capacity along with a double action. Another benefit is that once you own an EAA witness you can pick up the other barrels and swap-aroo from one cal to the next pretty darn cheap! I am ordering a 40 S&W barrel for my 10mm to be able to shoot it a lot more for much less $$.

    I am curious about their poly framed versions of the CZ75B (Polymer Witness). I wonder how they would hold up to hot & heavy 10mm ammo like the double-tap or cor-bon 230 grn hard casts.

    http://www.eaacorp.com/handguns.html

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