Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: Question for Hewes Pacific Cruiser owners

  1. #1
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default Question for Hewes Pacific Cruiser owners

    So I'm thinking about getting a Hewescraft Pacific Cruiser. We're looking at the 26 with the marine head with twin 150hp outboards. I have a couple questions that would sure help us make a decision. First off, those folks that own these boats, how much do you think they weigh hauling them down the road with fuel and gear? What do you use to town them?

    What are folks getting for economy on these boats? I am partial to the twin 150s as I hate being underpowered in a boat. I want to maximize my economy on these engines so please don't tell me you burn 22gph at 40mph. Its fun to go that fast but I can feel my wallet burning when I do that

    I know this has also been asked alot, but how are they holding up? They've only been out for a few years now so I wanted to see about how the interiors and such were holding up to everyday use. They seem like a good boat but in some places I just get the feeling the durability isn't all that great.

  2. #2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    So I'm thinking about getting a Hewescraft Pacific Cruiser. We're looking at the 26 with the marine head with twin 150hp outboards. I have a couple questions that would sure help us make a decision. First off, those folks that own these boats, how much do you think they weigh hauling them down the road with fuel and gear? What do you use to town them?

    What are folks getting for economy on these boats? I am partial to the twin 150s as I hate being underpowered in a boat. I want to maximize my economy on these engines so please don't tell me you burn 22gph at 40mph. Its fun to go that fast but I can feel my wallet burning when I do that

    I know this has also been asked alot, but how are they holding up? They've only been out for a few years now so I wanted to see about how the interiors and such were holding up to everyday use. They seem like a good boat but in some places I just get the feeling the durability isn't all that great.

    IMO, I think you are at the point where you need to ride in one to tell for yourself what the hull does in moderate seas and also to monitor the fuel usage...it`s alot of $$ and would hate to see you disappointed. Sometimes the extra bucks pay big dividends (Wooldridge ).

  3. #3
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    IMO, I think you are at the point where you need to ride in one to tell for yourself what the hull does in moderate seas and also to monitor the fuel usage...it`s alot of $$ and would hate to see you disappointed. Sometimes the extra bucks pay big dividends (Wooldridge ).
    Its a good point. Wanna go for a ride? Just seems that going for a ride in the next few months will be unlikely given the weather.

  4. #4

    Default

    Just 6 weeks til shrimping...that pretty much kicks off alot of peoples seasons. Will Dewey`s do a sea trail with you?? I would think so for the kind of cash their asking.

    BTW, I don`t own anything on your list just been on board a few and they are all different creatures. My favorite hands down was the Wooly...performance and ride was easily the best. That said I ride with a good friend in his Fish-Rite and it is a good compromise for the $$ but leaves me wishing it had a higher bow. The Hewes is about the same and both are fair weather boats...the Wooly gives you more if you aren`t watching the weather and end up in deep poo.

    I personally like glass boats for their ride/handling/warmth but lack the ability to go to just any shore. I run an early Sea Sport hull that`s only 20' and it does much better than any 24' aluminum I`ve been in. Safety is my #1 concern followed by ultimate cost of operation. Keep in mind I`m not a creature comfort guy and am just out there to fish and sightsee so all the other fluff doesn`t factor in for me.

  5. #5
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default Not exactly the same but...

    I burn about 8 gal/hr at 26 mph, or about 3 mpg; a little better on really smooth seas and probably 10 gal/hr pushing into 3 footers or worse. That's in a 26' Hewes AK; it weighs less that the PC, but that is also with 4 people and a moderately heavy load. Engines are 135 Hondas, I presume your are talking Yamaha if buying from Dewey's. In a Honda, the 135 is exactly the same as the 150 UNTIL you hit 4500 rpm, then the HVCC (valving technology) kicks in and gives you a high-end power boost @ $3000 more per engine, so I didn't think I needed that and haven't missed anything. You might try the Hewescraft Owners Forum for more specific fuel consumption on the boat you are considering.

    Yep, there are more refined boats than a Hewes for sure, I don't know anything about welding and there's been enough about that to make me believe that Woodridge may have a superior welding system...some mfgrs. grind their welds very smooth but I don't know that it make the weld any stronger, and Hewes welds do show, but some welders think they are great.

    We bring a lot of fish into our Hewes, and use the washdown right away and haven't had a buildup or stink problem in two seasons. Self bailing rear deck would be nice if you get stuck in some really confused, bad seas, but so far we have avoided anything over 6 footers, and our HC AK handled that fine. No doubt about it, you get what you pay for and for what we paid, we are very happy. We've only had two boats on PWS and operated them for the last 9 years, and some of these other folks have been on lots of boats to form their opinions over many years. I drive a Honda Accord and love it, but sure an Accura or a Lexus is better! But, the Accord is a lot safer than say a Geo...that's where you want to draw the line!

  6. #6

    Default

    While the conversation has not gone here yet, but it most certainly eventually will, I find it hard to believe that not having a self bailing deck is a safety concern. In fact depending on boat design, not having one means a higher gunwhale with a safer fishing deck, a lower center of gravity, and no scuppers to fail which translates into better seaworthiness. I hear the argument all the time that if you get a wave over the side that fills the boat it will bail itself out. And if conditions were perfect they would be right. Just as if conditions were perfect for the non self-bailer the pump would pump it all out too. However, I can't think of many situations where there is just this one wave all by itself that comes over the side and that is it. We all know that if we are out in conditions where one got us, there are hundreds more lying in waiting to get us again. And the point is the boat is going to be done no matter the design as the envelope has been pushed way too far. By the way, I try to avoid those days......lol

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    74

    Default Hc pc 260

    I did a sea trial on two down in Seattle. One with twin 150 and one with a Honda 350 and a kicker. I really like the Honda over the twin 150's. Plus the kicker uses alot less fuel during trolling. The model we were on was just a little wider than the standard PC 260 and did have a self bailing deck. I thought it handled pretty good. But like I wrote you in the PM. They dont ride like the heavier Glass boats and the Cruiser Aluminum Models. The thing with the Base model package from deweys, it will get you fishing in moderate weather. The windows will fog, the stove heater will work great as cabin heat while sitting still,. You will want to get some sort of toyo or walas heater for the cooler nights. the dealer in Soldatna told me he would beat Deweys price no matter how it was put together. Also contact the dealer in Washington. They quoted me 74.9 on the model with the honda last march. Im sure the price has gone up. But still cheaper getting it on the barge and purchasing there. then locally. Good luck. You wont find many used ones on craigs list. Seems like those that buy them keep them

  8. #8
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by 350SuperDuty View Post
    I did a sea trial on two down in Seattle. One with twin 150 and one with a Honda 350 and a kicker. I really like the Honda over the twin 150's.
    I believe you mean yamaha 350, right? The biggest honda puts out is a 225.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  9. #9
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default TR you nailed it....

    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    While the conversation has not gone here yet, but it most certainly eventually will, I find it hard to believe that not having a self bailing deck is a safety concern. In fact depending on boat design, not having one means a higher gunwhale with a safer fishing deck, a lower center of gravity, and no scuppers to fail which translates into better seaworthiness. I hear the argument all the time that if you get a wave over the side that fills the boat it will bail itself out. And if conditions were perfect they would be right. Just as if conditions were perfect for the non self-bailer the pump would pump it all out too. However, I can't think of many situations where there is just this one wave all by itself that comes over the side and that is it. We all know that if we are out in conditions where one got us, there are hundreds more lying in waiting to get us again. And the point is the boat is going to be done no matter the design as the envelope has been pushed way too far. By the way, I try to avoid those days......lol
    This sidebar on the question of self-bailing really nails it, thanks TR!

    Another sidebar: I got a 12v ceramic defroster, little 7 inch wide 1 1/2 inch diameter thing on a 3 inch stand, from online, can't re where, it has a built in blower, mounted it to blow on the helm window, no more foggy window! I do wish they had a built in defroster though, but that doesn't seem an option on most boats. Once our Wallas stove gets it warming up, all the windows defrost and I don't need the little one on.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    260

    Default Check a wide range of Dealers

    I was just at the Cabelas store in Lacey Wa the other day and they had two pacific cruisers on the lot ready for sale. They also had a couple 22 ft ocean pro's with hard tops. Prices seemed reasonable - but I didn't write anything down
    How stupid is it to be wasting tons of salmon and halibut as bycatch in the Bering Sea and then have the coastal villages hollaring they have no food? It's got to stop!

  11. #11

    Wink

    From the Hewescraft site, the performance + specs on an Alaskan 26' with twin Yamaha 150's. Should be close enuf to give you a feel for what your are about to receive.


    http://www.hewescraft.com/2007/docs/...50hp_twins.pdf

    Take into account, they don't use a full tank of gas or carry beer for most of their tests.

    Towing info, from their site Boat + motors + 130 gals of fuel weigh 5700#. plus trailer, plus gear. I'm guessing but your lookin at pulling 7500# +. So unless you own a Ford your hosed


    Hope this helps, good luck.

  12. #12
    Member Cap'n Ron's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Idaho/Valdez
    Posts
    980

    Default I checked out the hewes performance chart...

    that Oly Runner posted....for some reason they never say what the prop pitch is in any of these performance runs, and it makes a big difference. Looks to me like they are running this boat light and using a 21 pitch or at least a 19 pitch prop, because of the speeds they are getting at the rpms they show. Fine if you are always light weight, but with say 4 people, full tank, coolers, ice, beverages, fishing gear, pots etc etc I would bet this setup would bog down. A lower pitch prop (mine are 17 pitch) will give much better performance weighted down as most of us normally are. Wouldn't get 48 mph or whatever that chart showed at WOT, but who needs that? Some people that need better hole shot use a 4-blade which gets you out of the hole much faster but really sacrifices on top end. Also, I noticed that this boat was .190 on the bottom, my AK 260 has a .25 bottom, wonder if they changed this or made it an option?

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    3

    Default Performance Bulletin

    You will find a lot of very objective info on the Motor Manufacturer Website. The bulletins posted are performed by the motor company reps in cooperation with the boat manufacturers and they are nothing but objective. I believe they are required to have enough people on board to safely manage the craft. And it's my understanding that the amount of fuel is an attempt to work from a benchmark in spite of it not neccesarily being how you would load your boat. Search on Yamaha or Honda "Performance bulletin", when you get there you will be able to zero-in on boats by manufacturer or construction or type of boat. Anyway, good luck with that.

  14. #14
    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Kodiak
    Posts
    684

    Default

    Patrick, my apologies in advance for this hijack.

    TR and Cap'n Ron,

    Don't be such haters of us self bailing deck guys.

    I think you're going too far with your comments. Shucks, I think my deck may be (at the most) 2" higher because it's self bailing. That hardly makes for a significant gunnel height and stability issue. On the flip side for Kingfishers (can't speak for other S.B. boats), the step down into the lower floor in the cabin certainly more than compensates for the slightly higher fish deck.

    As for keeping a cleaner deck, way easier with a self bailer. A cleaner deck due to care-free usage of a wash down hose also makes for a safer deck. No slip and slide cause it gets washed clean after each catch. Very nice.

    I of course still have bilge pumps like a non-bailer. Nice to know that my pumps aren't sucking up scales, slime, and any chunks that end up in a bilge on a non-bailer, which may shorten those pump's lives some.

    Your right about most people aren't out in rough enough seas to worry about waves coming over the rail, but I've been glad to know waves I take over my bow or over my side are flowing right out the back. It doesn't happen often, but it is an additional safety factor.

    I'm not promoting sailing in really rough seas, but I will say that taking multiple waves over the bow or rail does not predetermine a boat to be "done". Bailing or not, many boats out there are made quite well and will take a lot providing the boat driver does his part. Shucks, I've been in 15-20 footers in a 15 foot Avon (non-bailer ) while still in the CG. Time the waves, anticipate, and use your throttle as much as you use your steering wheel.

    Know your boat, practice driving her in something other than straight lines, and spend time with friends who are experienced boat handlers (which you both likely are) to learn the value/risk of speed and reading waves. A fella should work hard to overcome his initial apprehension in handling a "new" boat through practice, practice, practice in smaller seas until he masters handling them. It won't happen overnight, but most boats out there will handle a lot provided the driver doesn't abuse them. Anybody can buy and drive a small boat without any "drivers ed" or a drivers license.....try that with a car. Ok, I'll climb off my soap box now. That's my 28 years in the CG talking.

    DON'T misinterpret this as me condoning people going out in rough seas unless they are confident (based on personal experience) that they can handle the conditions!

    Mike

  15. #15

    Default

    Mike,

    I think the real difference is probably very marginal between the two in a boat, but 2 inches differences is probably an understatement. I pointed it out because the conversation usually goes the other way; that is the self bailer is safer and I was trying to point out that the difference is slight in the boat's abilities. Now as far as convenience, one that drains the guts out is FAR superior in those respects. As far as actual seaworthiness, it is not. Yet as I say that, who cares? You're not going out anyway......And either is the other guy with the bucket.....

    Quote Originally Posted by HuntKodiak View Post
    Patrick, my apologies in advance for this hijack.

    TR and Cap'n Ron,

    Don't be such haters of us self bailing deck guys.

    I think you're going too far with your comments. Shucks, I think my deck may be (at the most) 2" higher because it's self bailing. That hardly makes for a significant gunnel height and stability issue. On the flip side for Kingfishers (can't speak for other S.B. boats), the step down into the lower floor in the cabin certainly more than compensates for the slightly higher fish deck.

    As for keeping a cleaner deck, way easier with a self bailer. A cleaner deck due to care-free usage of a wash down hose also makes for a safer deck. No slip and slide cause it gets washed clean after each catch. Very nice.

    I of course still have bilge pumps like a non-bailer. Nice to know that my pumps aren't sucking up scales, slime, and any chunks that end up in a bilge on a non-bailer, which may shorten those pump's lives some.

    Your right about most people aren't out in rough enough seas to worry about waves coming over the rail, but I've been glad to know waves I take over my bow or over my side are flowing right out the back. It doesn't happen often, but it is an additional safety factor.

    I'm not promoting sailing in really rough seas, but I will say that taking multiple waves over the bow or rail does not predetermine a boat to be "done". Bailing or not, many boats out there are made quite well and will take a lot providing the boat driver does his part. Shucks, I've been in 15-20 footers in a 15 foot Avon (non-bailer ) while still in the CG. Time the waves, anticipate, and use your throttle as much as you use your steering wheel.

    Know your boat, practice driving her in something other than straight lines, and spend time with friends who are experienced boat handlers (which you both likely are) to learn the value/risk of speed and reading waves. A fella should work hard to overcome his initial apprehension in handling a "new" boat through practice, practice, practice in smaller seas until he masters handling them. It won't happen overnight, but most boats out there will handle a lot provided the driver doesn't abuse them. Anybody can buy and drive a small boat without any "drivers ed" or a drivers license.....try that with a car. Ok, I'll climb off my soap box now. That's my 28 years in the CG talking.

    DON'T misinterpret this as me condoning people going out in rough seas unless they are confident (based on personal experience) that they can handle the conditions!

    Mike

  16. #16
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    712

    Default

    I've speculated before about adding a self-bailing deck to my 26' hewes short cabin. Looking at the waterline stain on the boat versus the inside depth, I would need only to raise the deck 1"-2" to have it be well clear of the waterline. There ain't much (besides lots of welding and work) to a self bailing deck: Continuous welding to sides and cabin bulkhead, weld up and deepen the in-floor fish box, seal off the bilge via bulkhead welding and modification, and add scuppers. Raise floor by welding structural members across the box girders to the hull sides, and lay floor plate on that.

    I probably have less motor on the stern than others - a 225 honda and 15 honda kicker. You guys with twin 150 4-strokes or larger might have a higher waterline to play with.

    As for stability, this would be pretty easy to simulate by building the floor up a couple inches with lumber and seeing how things work. Based on prior experience with other self-bailing tin boats, I'd say this would not be a problem, at all. Weight addition for a tin floor versus marine plywood would be pretty negligible.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    wasilla
    Posts
    788

    Default

    I have had my PC 260 for a couple years now and put a bit over 200hrs so far. We are running 115's on it and have been pretty happy with it so far. Some minor problems but Dewey's have been pretty much top shelf on anything than needed to be done.

    The 115 sip fuel but if i had it to do again they would be 150hp.
    The prop pitch on them is 15's and i have tryed 17's but they pulled the motors down a bit.


    I took this boat down the Koyokuk last Sept with 3 guys and a lot for weight in low water and it did fine. I have been 5ft seas confused and it did fine. I have not had seas over the bow yet and if i do than that is my poor judgement.

    I do wish that Hewes did a 28' because you give up fishing deck with the head and it would be nice to have that extra 18'' on the end.

    These boats are pretty darn light as compared to others out there which can go both ways depending on what you are wanting. I pull this boat with a 2001 dodge deisel.

    I have 160gal in the hull and have carried almost that on the deck on the yukon hunt and again it did very well.

    I think that Hewes is about the best bang for the buck out there for the price.

    Hope this helps
    Regards

    Sweepint
    Wasilla, (when not overseas)
    '' Livn' The Dream ''
    26' Hewescraft Cuddy, twin 115 Yam

  18. #18

    Default

    T.R., It's usually not the first wave over the back that gets you, or even the 2nd, but the 3rd or the 4th. A scuppered deck will usually dump the water faster, and gravity is much more dependable than an electic pump.

    That being said, the Hewes is a wonderful boat. I believe their 26 is offered with a scuppered deck now. As for the twin 115's, I've heard several people say they wish they had 150's. No replacement for displacement. My fam has a Kingfisher 2525 with a Honda 225 and 15 kicker, and our buddy has a 26 PC with twin yam 115's. They seem to perform pretty much the same - PC cabin is bigger inside but deck is smaller - although the gunnwales are higher, a plus with kids. They both do 38mph max @6000 rpm, 25-35 cruise depending on RPM's. Fuel burn seems about the same - but we don't have flow meters. The 160gal tank on the hewes is a huge plus. We have a 120, and that extra 40 gallons really makes a difference - we always carry extra gas on longer trips. With the kicker, we only do about 6-8mph, but he can't get on step with one motor either, so that means about 9 mph if I'm not mistaken, unless he changes props (not gonna happen in rough weather). I like the 15 hp kicker on the king because it's all tied in like twins (electric start, trim/tilt, steering) but it has an axuillary rope start, and alternator for a dead battery situation. You can also easily disconnect the gas line and hook it to your dinghy tank in the event of bad gas. These two features provide backups for 90% of lost power situations on the water. Also great for nosing up on the beach, the 15 shaft is pretty short, and the props are cheap. Keeps our main motor hours low when trolling too. Twin 115's sure looks good hanging off the back of those boats though. Can't speak for the Hewes, but we haven't found much weather that the Kingfisher won't do 20mph through with some trim tab tuning - they handle exceptionally. When the bow rails start rattling, you know it's rough. We have a triple axle trailer and tow ours with an 01 chev 2500 hd, but you could tow it with a newer 1/2 ton I think. My buddy tows his 26 pc with an 07 chevy 1/2 ton no problem.

  19. #19
    Sponsor
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Whittier, Alaska
    Posts
    16

    Default Rent-a-Hewes

    Call Whittier Boat Rentals 232-2783.
    Rob Cone-Clark
    Whittier Boats
    http://www.alaska-boat-rentals.com
    Tel. 1.907.632.1188

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •