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Thread: Shrimping

  1. #1
    Member Mel Roe's Avatar
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    Default Shrimping

    Can someone give me the basiscs on how you deploy your shrimp pots. I want to give it a try and have an idea where the shrimp might be(if there are any in the Kodiak area) but want to get some information on the best way to position your pots. Do you put an anchor on the top of the rock ledge and let your pots drape over the side or do you anchor the bottom and string your pots up the side of the edge? Thanks for any help you can give.

    Mel

  2. #2
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I don't know of anyone that uses an anchor to hold their string of shrimp pots, I think you'd risk getting the string hung up. Some people weight the bottom of the shrimp pots to get them to sink faster. You can take a 400' length of 1/4" poly line with tie in points every 100' for your 5 pots, and connect it to 800' of either leadcore line, or poly line that has weight added to sink the line, then connect it to your float/buoy

    When are at the point you want to drop the pots, drop the first one and as the line pays out slowly head towards shore dropping the remaining pots. Tide changes can drift the pots a fair distance, so weighting them is a big help as well as dropping them at slack tide.

    The only downside of weighted pots is you need a strong puller to retrieve them, as you'll burn out the motor on a lesser puller.

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    No anchor. If you buy the typical coated wire or thin stainless-framed nesting pots, weight them to where they weigh from ten upward to 20 lbs each, depending as Paul says on the capability of your puller. I don't like putting all five of your pots on one string - I run two doubles and one single. Idle your boat over your target as you lay line out - it helps keep the line from hanging on your prop or trim tabs or whatever. If you want to string your pots in a line, idle straight as you lay out line. If you want to precisely drop a single pot, idle in a slow circle as you pay out line over your target.

    I don't get why everyone up here uses expensive inflatable polyform buoys on their ropes. I like one or two of the medium size cone foam buoys. I also add some hard plastic peanut or trawl buoys - these keep their buoyancy if and when the tide sucks your bouys under. I've not had a problem in PWS, but down in Puget Sound in WA, tides run hard enough to either carry heavily weighted pots away, or pull down your buoys if the pots hold the bottom. When this happens, the foam buoys come up on the next slack tide looking line some giant wrung them out...

  4. #4
    Member Mel Roe's Avatar
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    Default steep edge

    Say you want to fish a really steep edge how do you keep your pots from rolling or sliding down the steep incline? Thanks for the responses, just trying to get a feel for dropping the pots the right way.

  5. #5
    Member breausaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mel Roe View Post
    Say you want to fish a really steep edge how do you keep your pots from rolling or sliding down the steep incline? Thanks for the responses, just trying to get a feel for dropping the pots the right way.
    Donít worry, if you add about 10 to 15lbs to the bottom of the pots with chain or rebar or whatever they will stay where they land. The problem you will run into is having your pots float away if you donít use enough line. If your dropping on a steep slope at say the 600 ft line and the slope drops down to 800 feet you had better have 900 feet of line or more in case you miss the mark. Current can play a huge factor when setting a string of pots, for that reason its best to set uphill; if you decide to set alone a depth line do it at slack tide.
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    Sponsor potbuilder's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by breausaw View Post
    Donít worry, if you add about 10 to 15lbs to the bottom of the pots with chain or rebar or whatever they will stay where they land. The problem you will run into is having your pots float away if you donít use enough line. If your dropping on a steep slope at say the 600 ft line and the slope drops down to 800 feet you had better have 900 feet of line or more in case you miss the mark. Current can play a huge factor when setting a string of pots, for that reason its best to set uphill; if you decide to set alone a depth line do it at slack tide.
    If you end up in 800 that 900 of endline(buoyline) ain't gonna be enough, little bit of tide(current) and say bye to that gear. 25-30% more than the depth is what you need. Personaly i like to set from the top down.

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  7. #7

    Red face I spool my line out

    Heading towards the shore. That way the pots swing into their perch and less likely to slip deep. Just a tip. Down side is, you can swing into corral, and that's not fun.
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    Member NewMoon's Avatar
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    I just replaced my old folding (gray metal - galvanized??) pots with fixed round stainless ones.

    Is it important what material I use for weights? Chain vs lead, for instance? Galvanic issues that make the pots better or worse for attracting shrimp?
    Richard Cook
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  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I used the round stainless pots last year and zip tied 4# cod sinkers to get them down. I didn't see any difference in how the pots with and w/o sinkers caught shrimp.

  10. #10
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default weight

    I have never used any weight and don't loose pots. If the pots move it is usually from thieves. Five pots on a string, bait and the line is enough. I think it is more critical to use enough line. I have about 900 feet out.

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  11. #11
    Member Mel Roe's Avatar
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    Default Thanks

    Thank you for all the information, hopefully the weather will turn good in a couple weeks and I can give it a shot.

    Mel

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