Results 1 to 19 of 19

Thread: PWS camping - how to anchor boat

  1. #1
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default PWS camping - how to anchor boat

    I am getting the logistics figured out, for the most part, for hunting, fishing, and shrimping the sound this spring on our small zodiac. The boat doesn't hold very much, but is too big to carry out to the tide should I find the tide out and the boat beached.

    I have seen some diagrams on how to moor the boat but keep a line on shore -but can't seem to find them in google.

    The boat is 15'-5" with an old 40 on the back. We will start with short trips. How do you guys that camp on shore tie up your boat?

    What do you look for in a camping spot (right place to anchor your boat)?

    Do you use the anchor buddy stretchy type anchor rope and pullies?

    How much rode do you need?

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    If you are going to use an anchor buddy, I would suggest that you get 2 and hook them together. One is often just not long enough. The other option that works the best is to get an inflatable and anchor in deep enough water to stay floating and use the inflatable to get to the boat, seen many do that. With the anchor buddy you drop the anchor and motor to shore, the anchor sets while you motor to shore. Get out on shore and have another line attached and let the anchor buddy pull the boat back out. I would also recommend trying to watch the area you want to anchor in during a tide cycle and make note of how it drains.

    I keep at least 400ft of line to use for mooring and as an extra anchor line.
    I takes a couple hundred just for the tide swing where I anchor.

    Took me a while it figure it out and I still get burned every now and then. This is one anchor buddy and you see it was a boat length too short.



    Steve

  3. #3
    Member JustinW's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Norcal
    Posts
    130

    Default

    I actually just made and posted a diagram about a week or two ago here on this same subject.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=70803

    Check out this thread, talked about the same subject but with a larger boat. My solution works even better on smaller boats.

  4. #4
    Member AK NIMROD's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SOLDOTNA, AK
    Posts
    949

    Default

    bouy , anchor and enough line to tie off bouy but not too much (2-3xs the depth) that it would drift into be grounded on low tide. couple hundred feet of line would be enough in most areas.....some areas you could not carry enough line tie large metal ring to bouy loop line thru ring attach boat to just off center tie ends to shore separately, apart so they won't get tangled with each other. when pulling boat out and back you would need to attach the ends. don't pull boat all the way to the bouy( so it would not get tangled in bouy). pretty easy system similar to drawing by Justin.
    RETIRED U.S.A.F. CAPT.; LIFETIME MEMBER NRA; LIFETIME MEMBER ALASKA BOWHUNTER ASSOC.
    MASTER BOWHUNTER EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR; MEMBER UNITED BLOOD TRACKERS; POPE & YOUNG MEASURER

  5. #5

    Default

    I do quite a bit of overnight anchoring but in the slightly warmer Seattle area. I usually end up diving down to be sure my anchor is set, otherwise I can't get a solid nights sleep. I have used the anchor buddy with some success but with our tides, two "buddies" are usually needed.

    The best tool in my anchoring arsenal is my slide anchor. I went all out and got the huge one, but I think the medium size would work for most boats and is a heck of a lot easier to store. It's a little more expensive that the basic spikes I have seen people use at the sand bar but it is easy to deploy and well made. I use it for more non-boating applications than for actually anchoring.


  6. #6
    Member Ebbtide's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    273

    Default

    Here is an idea I used in PWS for about 10 years in a 21 foot Hewes. It only works in protected water and light winds with small boats. You go to Alaska Rubber and buy what is called rubber rope. The biggest they make is 3/8 and that is what I would get. Get about 100 feet of it because the stuff is very handy for a lot of uses. You tie one end of the rubber rope to the back of the boat and the other to a small anchor. Toss the anchor off and drive in to shore stretching the rubber rope. When you get to shore tie a reg line to the front of the boat and to shore while you load/unload. When you are finished load/unloading let the rubber rope pull the boat back into deeper water feeding out the line on the front then tie off the line on the front to secure the boat. This is a very quick way to anchor and keep the boat floating while you chase bears or whatever. I have also used it overnight. If the wind comes up you just pull the boat in and beach it. It wil probably be floating again before you get around in the morning anyway.
    "Ebbtide" 27 X 9 GlacierCraft
    MMSI#
    338157869

  7. #7
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default restrictions

    My biggest restriction is room for taking gear. This boat is small. I have a 3'x9' space for everything. By the time you get anchor, anchor rode, shrimp pots, 1000 foot of line, bouy for the pots, bouy for the boat, dog, wife, tipi, wood stove, air mattress, bags, cook gear, fishing gear, rifle, 2 bears, and a cooler full of beer in the thing it starts to get a wee bit cramped; so, I am trying to think small......

    This already is an inflatable - so taking another inflatable doesn't work.

    I think that I need to point the bow forward out into the coming waves - the transom on this thing sits very low and it could get swamped very easily. It wouldn't sink it - but it isn't probably too good for the motor.

    I don't really want to put it on shore - the hypalon/rubber bottom is in good shape and I want to keep it that way. I have an electric horse fence - but that is just more stuff to stuff into the dinghy.

    I will look into the rubber cord or the buddy. I could make a slide hammer boat holder, truck unsticker - but then again - more stuff......

    I may find that using this rubber dinghy is more worry than benefit. I used to take horses into the mountains with me for a month to 5 weeks elk hunting during archery season. I spent more time worrying about those durn horses than I did hunting. Not that I cared...I still got to hunt and I enjoyed the company and the camping too - but looking for your ride back home or worrying whether the beasts got into the sweet feed gets frustrating after a while. Looking at an airless dinghy or a motor that won't start may be frustrating too......I ended up doing more backpacking - but somehow I do not think that I will start swimming around in the sound! :-)

    I somehow missed the other thread - am headed there next.

  8. #8
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    How about using launch wheels? We had a set of wide, pneumatic ones for our 15.5' zodiak and they worked well. They mount on the transom and are out of the way until you need them.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  9. #9
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default do have

    I do have launch wheels for the boat. More stuff. I have not used them - but one ole fella at the archery shop said don't use them.....for what that is worth....

    I have an additional issue.....may not be a big deal. I welded up a steel rod holder it consists of 1.5" square tubing, it is a rectangle about 4 foot tall with one short side missing, the two legs then hook into where the launch wheels hook into. I mounted rod holders, net holders, etc. on the "rackiac" to keep the dog off my expensive poles (the cheap ones too!).

    The "rackiac" is pretty hefty at about 40 pounds and provides some substantial torque to the transom of this rubber dinghy. It works well though and is staying. I sometimes tie some cord/strap to the rackiac and then foward off to the strakes on the top of the boat to lessen the torque on the transom from this huge effective lever. Pounding the 4 footers at 20 mph you can see it flexing a wee bit.

    I am thinking that I might be able to duplicate the boat's transom mount out onto the rackiac to use and store the launch wheels. I have not tried this yet - and will first try it in the drive way to see how she handles. i can readily push the boat up the short drive way whilst it is sits on the trailer so I would imagine that if the wheels work well that I could push her out to sea if'n it isn't too muddy or too rocky - start the motor up and then lean off the back once under way (and stopped of course) and flip the wheels up - hopefully without loosing the rackiac and all of my fishing poles/fish finder/sonar/gps etc. - and without getting slammed back into the rocks. And - now I get to take my electric fence so that Yogi doesn't let the air out of my sails. More stuff.

    So - if there is a lighter, easier, less stressful on the boat and myself, way to moore the boat then I am all for it.

    I think that for our first couple go rounds - If the wheels work well at home that I will take them and an alternate means to moore the boat - try both methods and see which one we like best.

    My wheels are rubber (I think tubed) and about 13" diameter - pretty hard though - more sturdy than a wheelbarrow's wheels, but not like a Cub's tundra tires. -

    Are these what you had?

    Thanks for all the input -

  10. #10
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    That is what we had. Most of the ones I have seen advertised are pretty skinny. The ones we had were at least six inches wide and provided a lot of floatation on soft beaches. They worked well for us.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  11. #11
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default 6 inches

    O - mine are not that big...they are maybe 2 inches of tread pattern that would hit hard ground.

    I will still try it out and see. A fella could always pull the motor off and throw it on his back to carry it out - but that isn't really something that I would want to do morning and night everyday.

  12. #12

    Default

    Not sure if it would do you any good, but if you are concerned about dragging the boat ashore, there's a product made that you can brush onto the bottom of your inflatable to protect it. A liquid rubber of sorts. Comes in a can, add hardener, and brush on. W. Marine sells it is probably the only place to get it since shipping it would be a problem because of flammability.

  13. #13
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Homer, Alaska, USA
    Posts
    732

    Default Portable running line

    Before the new software for this website was installed there was an extensive discussion of how to set up a portable running line designed by a guy named Neal Mooney.

    I built one and it worked great on an overnight trip in PWS. I looked on Neal's website and I cannot find the plans anymore, but basically you use 3 feet of 4-inch PVC pipe and elbows to make a floating "pulley" that is anchored offshore, and then run a continuous loop of line from pulleys onshore to create a triangular running line.

    I'll keep looking for plans and post them here. If I can't find them I'll draw (watch out, I'm no artist) some and put them up....jim

  14. #14
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    4,835

    Default can't find

    The PVC plans were what I was looking for - but that means more stuff. I think I can do this with some stretchy cord and some steel rings.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    49

    Default My technique before upgrade

    After I unloaded my camping gear I would motor back out to where I new I would be safe and anchor my boat and tie it off as usual. I would then pull the anchor and backstack the line and place the anchor on the bow. I would then go back to shore and tie a second line to the bottom of the anchor and push the boat to where I was originally anchored and pull the anchor off the bow to set it. I then tied my line to a tree so it didn't get away. I never had any problems. Look for sea kayaker beaches they have great campsites and softer beaches typically.

  16. #16
    Member Alaskanmutt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage Alaska
    Posts
    947

    Default PVC pipe anchoring system

    http://www.neilmoomey.com/howtos/anchor_buoy/

    This the one you were looking for????

  17. #17
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Homer, Alaska, USA
    Posts
    732

    Default Yup!

    Das De WON!

  18. #18

    Default

    A word of caution with setting up running lines to shore using floating poly line. I would not use floating line in a popular anchorage like Thumb Cove in Reserruction Bay. I have seen recreational boats and water taxis run between my bouy and the shore over the running lines I have setup on numerous occasions. I always use sinking nylon line for my running lines. The only place where the lines are near the surface are at the bouy.

  19. #19

    Default

    Anyone had any luck using the anchor buddy sentinel (not the mooring anchor buddy)?

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •