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Thread: Black Bears?

  1. #1
    Member TMCKEE's Avatar
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    Default Black Bears?

    I would like to get a few opinions of why people hunt black bears, those that really go out of their way to pursue black bears not those that will take one if they see one. What is the draw for you? Is it the danger aspect, rugs, predator management, meat, etc...

    I never really thought of them as a meat animal, which is my primary reason for hunting. I was recently, however, intrigued by a "Chili Beardi" recipe on the forum that has me reconsidering this, and the "warm weather bear" thread has me itching to try something new this year.

    As a side note, if I were to decide to take up bear hunting...what considerations should I take in selecting a bear for its meat quality (time of year, size of animal, diet, what makes for a good eating bear)?

    Tyler

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Meat and the enjoyment of the hunt. As for selecting a bear for meat, your two best options are a spring bear during May or a late fall bear that is up high feeding on blueberries. Both will offer excellent meat. Avoid bears on salmon streams as they will not taste nearly as good.

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    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    a fall bear will yield the most fat, too. bear fat is excellent for baking and tamales, and when mixed with beeswax make a great leather dressing.
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    August, moutainside Blueberry fed Blacks have FAT and Meat well worth the hunt.

    Its the ONLY meat I like More than Caribou

    .........even "Awsome" would be an understaement!
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

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  5. #5
    Member skybust's Avatar
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    Default yummy good

    It is some of the best eating animal out there. I shoot them for the meat dont care about the hide.

  6. #6

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    Food, fur, and entertainment. Sometime I just sit in my stand and watch them, a whole lot better that TV.
    Chuck

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    Thumbs up MMMMMM good

    They are TASTEEE!!!

  8. #8
    Member ArcherBob's Avatar
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    Default Ditto

    Thrill of the hunt, meat. Spring or fall, I prefer fall blueberry and rasberry eating fattys.
    Bob

    Become one with Nature......... Then Marinade it.

  9. #9
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Its a meat animal for me and one of the best. My guns are purchased with bear as the goal but will work on everything else,not the other way around

  10. #10
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    I’ve heard allot of folks really love bear meat. I've eaten it twice in my life time and both times, the meat/roast look wonderful, smelled great, but when I tried to eat it, I was not impressed and didn't finish the meat. Both times, someone else cooked it for me. I've never tried to cook it myself to see if there was a difference. I will say, a few times when I saw a fully skinned out bear carcass, I thought it looked like a stout man. That image may have been burned in my brain to alter my psychological taste buds. I will have to try it one more time and cook it myself to satisfy my curiosity. For that reason alone, I have never shot a bear.

  11. #11

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    Predator Control. Black bears are prolific breeders and can multiply quickly. Every hunter should take as many as possible, as often as possible. The more of them you can remove from the ecosystem, the more other critters you get to eat. They make a decent sausage, but I don't care for the steaks, roasts and burger you get from them. I'll take a moose burger and sheep steak over black bear, every time.

    I would encourage you to hunt the black bears, and every other hunter as well.
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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default meat

    I'll be running my boat this May for Black Bear. My goal is meat. I want a load of good spring bear for a large batch of sausage and hot dogs.

    The secondary consideration is the hunt. In May I'm itchin' to get out run the boat and see the sights. It's a premium time to be poking around and learning about nature.

    My Kayak will be onboard too, so a little paddling in on the adjenda.

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I'm with Bighorse on this one. The allure of getting out and hunting for a game animal in the spring is hard to pass up. The fact that I like the meat, like the hides, and like helping predator control are all secondary to getting out in the woods in the spring.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Quote Originally Posted by TMCKEE View Post
    I would like to get a few opinions of why people hunt black bears, those that really go out of their way to pursue black bears not those that will take one if they see one. What is the draw for you? Is it the danger aspect, rugs, predator management, meat, etc...


    Tyler
    For me, I see no more danger in hunting bears than hunting other animals - I'm armed!

    My primary interest is meat, so I focus on tender spring bears and blueberry bears in the fall.

    Since I also like moose, I feel that we all should do more to enhance ungulate populations, so "predator control" is also a factor.

    I have the hide tanned and hung on the wall, not rugged. It's an attractive decoration and save space. The hides are also warm to sleep under.

  15. #15
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    Love the meat (my family's favorite), love hunting them, predator control.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  16. #16
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chico99645 View Post
    I will say, a few times when I saw a fully skinned out bear carcass, I thought it looked like a stout man.
    I was told this story by my best friends uncle many years ago.

    In the early 1970's or late 1960' they had gone to the back side of one of the large lakes (Tustumena?) or moose, and while there had to shoot a small griz in their camp. They skinned it and left the body on the shore or in the lake without its head or paws. A wind blew up and they were stuck on some other part of the lake for two days.

    On their way back to the camp there were several boats on the shore down wind of their camp. One of those was fish and wildlife. The guys stopped and a trooper asked about what they had seen in the area.

    "Been stuck a few miles away for two days so not much, why?"

    "Well there is the body of a dead man over there that was shot and then was skinned and decapitated and we are trying to find out anything we can about this murder."

    "Umm, its the carcass of our grizzly bear from three days ago."

    Well that started a huge argument from the troopers and wildlife guys on the scene about this very "robust" dead man that was shot, skinned, decapitated, and had its hands and feet removed.

    The uncle was becoming pretty PO'd with the silly troopers and asked how many men they knew with tails. One of the wildlife guys went over to the scene and inspected the rear and noted that indeed this man's tail had been cut off as well.

    They went to camp and noted that there was in deed the salted hide of a small grizzly that was not much bigger than the rubust dead man down the lake shore.

    The officials left pretty upset with themselves, but did tell the uncle how the carcass was found. Some boaters were trying to stay near shore in the wind and found the body. The guys wife saw it first and completely freaked out. The trooper thought he had his first mafia crime scene and was not willing to buy into the dead bear theory for quite some time.

  17. #17
    Member chico99645's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Ray View Post
    I was told this story by my best friends uncle many years ago.

    In the early 1970's or late 1960' they had gone to the back side of one of the large lakes (Tustumena?) or moose, and while there had to shoot a small griz in their camp. They skinned it and left the body on the shore or in the lake without its head or paws. A wind blew up and they were stuck on some other part of the lake for two days.

    On their way back to the camp there were several boats on the shore down wind of their camp. One of those was fish and wildlife. The guys stopped and a trooper asked about what they had seen in the area.

    "Been stuck a few miles away for two days so not much, why?"

    "Well there is the body of a dead man over there that was shot and then was skinned and decapitated and we are trying to find out anything we can about this murder."

    "Umm, its the carcass of our grizzly bear from three days ago."

    Well that started a huge argument from the troopers and wildlife guys on the scene about this very "robust" dead man that was shot, skinned, decapitated, and had its hands and feet removed.

    The uncle was becoming pretty PO'd with the silly troopers and asked how many men they knew with tails. One of the wildlife guys went over to the scene and inspected the rear and noted that indeed this man's tail had been cut off as well.

    They went to camp and noted that there was in deed the salted hide of a small grizzly that was not much bigger than the rubust dead man down the lake shore.

    The officials left pretty upset with themselves, but did tell the uncle how the carcass was found. Some boaters were trying to stay near shore in the wind and found the body. The guys wife saw it first and completely freaked out. The trooper thought he had his first mafia crime scene and was not willing to buy into the dead bear theory for quite some time.

    To Funny, but I can see how it could happen!!!

  18. #18
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Berry Bears

    Ok gentlemen.....I got kinda an issue to discuss with you all.

    Berry Bears and the sentiment that they are better than a fish bear.

    Where I live berries and fish coexist. Where I live bears climb mountains. Fast!

    I can run up a 2,500 ridgeline in an hour. As I did for the local Alpine Adventure Run here in Sitka a couple times now.

    So.....my issue about this berry fed bear thing. Well Blueberries lay low in the valley, Salmon Berries lay low in the valley, Huckleberries lay low too.

    Of course after all the lower berries are gone the alpine berries come on. I understand this and look forward to it every year.

    So who's to say a bear hasn't been eating Salmon and Berries? A bear is afterall a four wheelin' mountain climbing machine. Berries for breakfast.....Salmon for dinner.

    Maybe it's comletly different for interior bears? Here in SE I'm kinda confused and have difficulty drawing the line between a fish bear and a berry bear. It seems to me that a bear could easily have both in their diet.

  19. #19
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Around where I am the bears move from the fish to the berries in late September. The berries are all the way out then, and the salmon around here are pretty much gone. Way more berries around here just below treeline than down in the valleys.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  20. #20
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    here on k-bay there are only a couple places where you could even find a blackie on salmon... in the alpine on blueberries that's likely all they have been eating.
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
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