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Thread: scope parallax question

  1. #1

    Default scope parallax question

    I bought a Nikon Monarch 1-4X20 scope to go with my new Ruger Hawkeye Alaskan in .375 Ruger, but before I mounted it noticed that the cross-hairs were moving to a different point as I moved my head/eye around on the lens.

    I'm not that experienced with scope problems, such as parallax, but sort of remember that a Redfield Widefield I once had did something similar, resulting in poor shot groups wandering around 5" at 100 yds. So I sent it in to Nikon on warrantee, but it came back in the same condition.

    Is it just me, and I should accept what seems to be a scope alignment problem, and just try to work with a good cheek weld to the stock, etc.? This scope is supposed to be good for quickness and with "both eyes open." Appreciate any tips on this. Hope people that check their eye movement on the lens don't suddenly realize it ain't right.

    bookburn

  2. #2
    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    All scopes have parallax, unless they have external adjustment to eliminate it. At what range is the parralax on your scope fixed? Do the cross hairs still move at that range?
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Yeah, a scope can only be parallax free at one range unless it is adjustable for parallax. Different companies use different ranges for that fixed distance. Most high powered rifle scopes are set at 150yds or more. If the set is at short range it can be off a couple of feet at 300yds. If its set at 200/250yds it won't be off more than an inch or so at 100. I have often wondered if parallax isn't the reason some rifles shoot tighter groups at 200yds than 100. Your scope probably is not broken but may have a parallax setting on the long end.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Your low power scope is most likely set parallax free at 75. Most high power scopes are preset at 150 yards.

    You need to find the center of your scope with your eye by making small movements side to side and up and down. Bracket yourself to the center by moving away from the shadow created be movement. Once you find the center remember the cheek weld and your shots will improve.

    I have adjustable side focus scopes on my long range rifles and the parallax is adjusted at any range by the shooter. Once the parallax is adjusted movement does not affect the cross hairs.

    I have a Leupold VX-7 1.5-6X24 on my 375 and the parallax is fixed. I have noticed the same issues you have described and shot great groups by finding the center. In a hunting situation even if your off center you will still be within a half inch so no big deal. It's only when shooting groups that these non adjustable scopes make a real difference.

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    Isn't it true, that even though the parallax is wrong for the distance you're shooting from, that if you align your eye to the center of the scope, it won't cause a problem.

    It's when you move your eye to align the cross hairs, instead of moving the gun after centering the scope to your eye that causes a sighting error.

    That's the way I understand it.

    Smitty of the North
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    Thats true Smitty and your eye doesn't even have to be centered it just has to be in the same place each time hench the necessity of a good consistant cheek weld.

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smitty of the North View Post
    Isn't it true, that even though the parallax is wrong for the distance you're shooting from, that if you align your eye to the center of the scope, it won't cause a problem.

    It's when you move your eye to align the cross hairs, instead of moving the gun after centering the scope to your eye that causes a sighting error.

    That's the way I understand it.

    Smitty of the North
    That's true Smitty. What I was trying to say is find the center of the scope by moving your eye and remember that hold. Then with that in mind move the rifle and align the cross hairs. Finding center is not always easy if you don't shoot often.

    Once the Parallax is adjusted with the side focus scopes moving your eye doesn't move the recital in relation to the target so shots are improved at distance.

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    Thanks you guys.

    I was just taking the opportunity to verify my information.

    I think this is important to know when you shoot at short range. I used to wonder why my 25 yard groups were sometimes worse than 100 yard groups, as to how correlate size wise. This could explain it.

    Thanks Again
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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