Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 33

Thread: Draw weight

  1. #1
    Member MNViking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    746

    Default Draw weight

    Opinion question:

    When is it too much for an individual? I am by no means a macho man that needs to draw 80lbs to feel like a tough guy. I do, however, wish to draw as much as possible for the simple fact that it MAY help out if I make a range estimation error.

    My bow goes from 55-70lbs. At the minimum setting I can shoot all day and not really get tired. I have been adding a quarter turn here and there to build "bow strength" but I think I have it a plateau. I am only good for about 12 shots and then I start to feel my "old man twinge" in my shoulder sockets and my form suffers. I do not want to injure myself or learn bad habits so I stop.

    My concern is that if I'm hunting and got a case of buck fever, am I going to be able to draw this baby and make a shot? Am I better off keeping the draw weight low?
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

  2. #2
    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    695

    Default

    At one point I had my bow maxed out at 70 lbs. I noticed that every other draw I was pulling the arrow off the rest, I guess with bad form and straining alittle bit. I backed the bow off to 66 lbs and have not had a problem since. It all comes down to finding that perfect weight for yourself while maintaining good form and a smooth draw. Also, keep in mind kids kill deer with bows at 40 lb draws!!

  3. #3
    Member aksheephuntress's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    seward,ak
    Posts
    431

    Default

    ....the max. draw weight I can physically pull back right now is 58 pounds...

    -but, I have my one bow I use for black bear maxed out at 45 lbs...my other bow, for the bigger class AK game, maxed out 50 lbs...
    -the maximum either will go...

    -I remember something Marc Taylor told me once( Marc...-I hope I remember you right??-)...is that one's bow performs best at the max. poundage it is made for...

    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    north pole
    Posts
    336

    Default

    i would say you should be able to hold your bow paralell to the ground and pull it streight back if you have to hold up in the air and push your bow while pulling the string your drawing to much weight you only need to go 50lbs for moose and bear, i pull 65lbs but i was not happy with penetration on my moose last year at 10yds so im going with a faster bow at 70lbs and carbons.

  5. #5
    Member Matt M's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    189

    Smile Weight for Draw

    Well,

    Here is the short story made long:

    Modern compounds store energy like nobody's business. I was shooting the same bow from 1990 to 2002 at 73 pounds. It does make you tired when you shoot a lot of arrows. This is not the same as hunting and shooting 1 or 2 times. I started shooting a newer bow and have been happy at 63 pounds because there is a minimum hold weight that works for my brain muscle memory and feels good to me. 60 pounds is enough for anything on this continent and with a scalpel sharp broadhead I could be pretty confident and probably say 50 is enough too. If you are shooting a lot of arrows a day, shoot a lower weight and be happy and save the shoulders.

    Now your answer, it is whatever works best for you. Keep you draw weight comfortable and not difficult. If you can draw from sitting, bending at the waist, feet on uneven ground, and kneeling without having to strain, you are at a good weight. Do not go heavy to compensate for range estimation...try a range finder from E-bay.


    Matt M

  6. #6

    Default

    From what you said, you can shoot about 12 shots at the max 70# draw weight before you start having problems where you think you might lose accuracy. Remember, in the wild, you most likely will only take one shot. If you don't have trouble until 12 shots or so, you would be fine in the field.

    Personally, I prefer the higher draw weight for the same reason you mentioned, because it will increase your effective range. I don't plan on shooting 20 shots at once when I am out hunting. After all, I only have 6 arrows with me so as long as I can pull and shoot that many without compromizing my accuracy, I don't see an issue with needing to drop weight.

    The question comes in when you consider practice. If you need to shoot a lot to get comfortable, then you might want to drop the poundage in order to allow the number of shots necessary. When I go out to practice, I don't shoot a lot of shots at any one time, but rather shoot a lower number and shoot more frequently. If figure it better simulates hunting. I don't typically shoot 10 or 15 shots before heading out in the morning to hunt, but I want to be able to pick the bow up and shoot the same on the first shot the next day as I did the day before.

  7. #7
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default Usually

    Last time mine hit the scale at 72#. I have since scaled back to 68-70 from what I can tell. Since I like to hunt moose and someday want a brown bear I am keeping it there. Another factor is practice time. I shoot 3-4 times a week to keep the muscles in shape. Either way. You should be able to draw the bow straight back, with your arm extended out. Other wise you are probably over-bowed. Too much movement at close range trying to draw down.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  8. #8

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Daveinthebush View Post
    Last time mine hit the scale at 72#. I have since scaled back to 68-70 from what I can tell. Since I like to hunt moose and someday want a brown bear I am keeping it there. Another factor is practice time. I shoot 3-4 times a week to keep the muscles in shape. Either way. You should be able to draw the bow straight back, with your arm extended out. Other wise you are probably over-bowed. Too much movement at close range trying to draw down.
    Getting a bit off topic here, but I make sure that I never aim above the target (at least no more than needed to hit depeding on the distance). When I draw, it's either pointed directly at the target or aiming down and drawing up to the target. It essentially eliminates the chance of a misfire heading off into outer space. Worst case is you hit the dirt between you and the target. My brother now does the same as he is still looking for an arrow in the neighbor's farm field after the dog ran into him from behind when he was drawing.... I agree that if you can't draw straight back, you probably need to tone down the poundage until you can.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    North Pole
    Posts
    188

    Default what your comfortable with

    I usually have my bow turned down a round or two in early spring, so I can practice more without getting tired, and then start cranking it up towards hunting season. I have no doubt that a 40 pound bow can kill an animal, I killed my first doe with a 33 pound bow when I was twelve. The reason I like more weight is for the times I misjudge a distance by 3 yards or when I make a marginal shot. The more power you have is going to help you.

    I also agree with what was said earlier that a bow shoots best when it is maxed out. That's what it was engineered for. Just my humble opinion.

  10. #10
    Member tiger15's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    211

    Default Temperature

    I agree with all the other statements as well, but one more factor to consider is what will the temperature be when you are hunting. Drawing a bow back when it is 60 degrees is totally different than drawing a bow back when it is 5 degrees and you have sitting idle for a while. You want to consider this as well into the draw weight. You do not want to tear a muscle or your shoulder when the shot presents itself...that would definitely be a bad hunting experience. Just my thoughts.

    Terry

  11. #11
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    Going with more poundage to get a flatter shooting bow is a common misconception. Here are the problems with this.
    • A higher poundage bow generally will require a heavy arrow to spine correctly. This is a good thing if you need heavier arrows for the game you are hunting. However, going to the heavier arrow reduces the speed of the 70# bow to the speed of a 60# bow. There are lots of variables here, but it's one thing that many people fail to consider.
    • Lets assume that by going to a 70# bow magically gives you another 50 feet per second (not going to happen). Lets say you have two bows that are accurately sighted in. One shoots 300fps and the other 250fps. Now lets say you are shooting at a 40 yard target that you misestimated as 45 yards. The 300fps bow is going to shoot 3.75" low, the 250fps bow is ONLY going to shoot 5.81" low. Whoa, you say, how is this possible. It's possible because bows, unlike rifles, generally have sights that are set up for specific yardages. So, while the pin gap is tighter on a 300fps bow, both bows have a 40 yard pin and that little error above is the result of misjudging by 5 yards. Not the error in trajectory as if both bows shot at the target with their 20 yard pins. If you are misjudging by more than 5 yards you need more practice or use a rangefinder.
    The only reason I see to use a modern bow (last 10 years) more than 60lbs is if you have game target that requires it. I am totally comfortable with my setup at 270fps with 400 grain arrows for anything in Alaska. I get this with a 58lb bow and that's what I use. That same setup will shoot 600 grain arrows at 230 fps...which is way faster than almost any 70lb trad bow and faster than almost all compounds from 20 years ago.

    The beauty of the new 330fps wonderbows is that they can shoot heavy arrows at low poundages and get the job done...not that they can shoot light arrows at blazing, hard to tune, speeds.

    Just my $1.50 worth...
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  12. #12
    Member spoiled one's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    3,230

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    Getting a bit off topic here, but I make sure that I never aim above the target (at least no more than needed to hit depeding on the distance). When I draw, it's either pointed directly at the target or aiming down and drawing up to the target. It essentially eliminates the chance of a misfire heading off into outer space. Worst case is you hit the dirt between you and the target. My brother now does the same as he is still looking for an arrow in the neighbor's farm field after the dog ran into him from behind when he was drawing.... I agree that if you can't draw straight back, you probably need to tone down the poundage until you can.
    Another tip, to add to this scenario, is to keep your finger behind behind the trigger (if using a release of course). Tim at the old Full Draw told me that. Makes sense.
    Spending my kids' inheritance with them, one adventure at a time.

  13. #13

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by spoiled one View Post
    Another tip, to add to this scenario, is to keep your finger behind behind the trigger (if using a release of course). Tim at the old Full Draw told me that. Makes sense.
    That is another trick I use as well. The shooting finger is hooked behind the release until I am ready to shoot.

  14. #14
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2003
    Location
    Valdez, Alaska
    Posts
    4,402

    Default Three times that

    Quote Originally Posted by anchskier View Post
    That is another trick I use as well. The shooting finger is hooked behind the release until I am ready to shoot.
    Three times on that. My trigger is light enough, about 1 pound or less. So the finger is always behind the trigger until the right moment.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
    Cancer from Agent Orange - Aug. 25th 2012
    Cancer Survivor - Dec. 14th 2012

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    40

    Default Re: Draw weight concerns

    I have seen a proficient and practiced archer unable to draw his bow under the stress of whooting a bear. He made multiple attempts and failed every time. He was successful at drawing when his attention was diverted, had him look at a tree and draw, which he did easily, and killed the bear. I have found a very good test of oneís ability to handle draw weight is to sit on the floor, legs extended in front of you, then draw your bow smoothly while pointed at your target.

    Easton's Kinetic Energy Recommendation Chart
    25-41 ft pounds Medium game (deer, antelope, etc)
    42-65 ft pounds Large game (elk, black bear wild boar, etc)
    >65 ft pounds Toughest game (Grizzly, Cape buffalo, Musk Ox, etc)

    They also consider 55 foot pounds of energy capable of taking any North American game animal

    ADF&G allows taking of black bear with the same equipment as deer, and I agree that they arenít any harder to kill than deer.

    A bow shooting a 425 grain arrow at 250 fps develops 59 ft/# of energy. My current Mathews Ultra Max (1996) shoots my 484 grain arrow at 286 fps for 86 ft/# of energy at only 70# draw weight.

    I agree -- safety first.

  16. #16
    Member ArcherBob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Salcha & Clear Alaska
    Posts
    173

    Default My $.02

    I am set at 69-71 and have been for years, I keep my "bowmuscles" in shape by shooting often. I think everyone has to figure out their own weight which they are comfortable and able to draw somewhat easily.

    I also shoot from all sorts of positions (kneeling, sitting on feet, sitting on ground, laying on back drawing then sitting up, and so on...) making sure I can draw without moving the actual bow from each position. All of these are positions I have been in when game offered the optimum shot placement.
    Bob

    Become one with Nature......... Then Marinade it.

  17. #17
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Talking

    FOBs take 10 pounds off perceived draw weight.

    I'l explain:

    The aerodynamic superiority of the FOB drastically decreases the drag caused by the travel of the shaft to the rear, causing a euphoric, almost orgas*** release of endorphins during the draw. The mere thought of the shaft's laser-like trajectory upon the anticipated release causes an adrenalin dump into the vascular system creating hulk-like drawing ability.

    Now, I'm no physician, so you'll just have to trust me on this one. Current FOB users experience this dramatic side-effect each and every time a FOB'd arrow is nocked!

    We are currently taking applications for additional FOB users.

    The line starts outside.

    Taylor

    -[]------->

  18. #18
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,279

    Talking

    Further:

    Male shooters take note:

    The use of performance-enhancing drugs, ie Viagra, Cialis or Levitra, is not recommended up to 24 hours before the use of FOBs in an archery setting.

    Priopism may result and you'll be "that guy" standing in line at the emergency room!

    Taylor

    -[]-------->

  19. #19
    Member chico99645's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Palmer
    Posts
    1,481

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    FOBs take 10 pounds off perceived draw weight.

    I'l explain:

    The aerodynamic superiority of the FOB drastically decreases the drag caused by the travel of the shaft to the rear, causing a euphoric, almost orgas*** release of endorphins during the draw. The mere thought of the shaft's laser-like trajectory upon the anticipated release causes an adrenalin dump into the vascular system creating hulk-like drawing ability.

    Now, I'm no physician, so you'll just have to trust me on this one. Current FOB users experience this dramatic side-effect each and every time a FOB'd arrow is nocked!


    We are currently taking applications for additional FOB users.

    The line starts outside.

    Taylor

    -[]------->

    OK, now I feel stupid. What is an FOB?

  20. #20

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by tiger15 View Post
    I agree with all the other statements as well, but one more factor to consider is what will the temperature be when you are hunting. Drawing a bow back when it is 60 degrees is totally different than drawing a bow back when it is 5 degrees and you have sitting idle for a while. You want to consider this as well into the draw weight. You do not want to tear a muscle or your shoulder when the shot presents itself...that would definitely be a bad hunting experience. Just my thoughts.

    Terry
    I second what tiger posted........

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •