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Thread: Need help/advice on gold claim and building cabin

  1. #1

    Default Need help/advice on gold claim and building cabin

    Ok, I'm 44 and have been Ak for 5 years and love it. I teach, my health does great in teh dry, cold weather...So, I need to think about retirement and start building. But, I want off the road system.

    So, I'm ignorant on the laws about purchasing land through the state adn also, I've heard that you can make a gold claim and put a movable cabin on it?

    If you have any leads on where to look at teh AK state website for land for sale, please let me know.

    Also, I'm looking at the area near McGrath to teach in, so, is it as easy as staking a claim to where I can put a movable cabin on it? For how long? Is this a decent plan?

    I"m 44, so, this would be great for at least teh next 20 years...after that?

    Lastly, I would consider looking at something on teh road system, especially if my health is not doing great. Any ideas on good areas from Anch, to McCarthy, up to fairbanks? I guess the road system is not bad if it is in the sticks....Gold near by would be great!

    thanks,
    scotty
    Scotty in the AK bush

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    I have begun this process last year, with the DNR. the Gold claims can not be used as a Residence and permits to erect a cabin need to be approved on a need basis for more then recreational use. basically you have to show them need for security for regular mining operations, and the need for more then a tent platform. you are correct though that the cabin must be movable, nothing can be on a permanent foundation, as the site must be cleaned when returned to the state. If you figure out how to purchase your claim I would love to hear how. Thanks Wobbly.

  3. #3

    Default state land for sale...

    I know you can't buy a gold claim, but, the state of alaska does have a dept that sales state land via closed auctions. I've looked through a link I was sent one time but it seemed pretty complex...

    So, it sounds like as long as I have a mine under my cabin with a trap door going down to it, or need to store my mining equipment in a secure location, then I could qualify to place a temporary cabin on it, right?
    Scotty in the AK bush

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    Quote Originally Posted by jssbastiat View Post
    I know you can't buy a gold claim, but, the state of alaska does have a dept that sales state land via closed auctions. I've looked through a link I was sent one time but it seemed pretty complex...

    So, it sounds like as long as I have a mine under my cabin with a trap door going down to it, or need to store my mining equipment in a secure location, then I could qualify to place a temporary cabin on it, right?
    It's a lot more complicated than that. Short version is that if you are doing it part time you probably won't be able to put up any type of cabin.
    The old "mine under the cabin with the trap door" scene pretty much only works in the movies. It could give you an additional method of access but not the only ("for security") one because you would have to haul all your material up the shaft & through your cabin to get it out to process. When you are talking literally tons of material that isn't practical. You have to have shafts or sddits where you can bring out volumes of material.

    You can buy land from the DNR but it most likely won't have much mining value, or even be close to ground that does.

    Best bet will be to find a worthwhile claim, set up a tent platform, & put a nice wall tent on it seasonaly.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  5. #5

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    The "GOLD" is in the surface Real Estate. I remember when everything in Wasilla was $200.-- Per Acre. Even the "So-called" Commercial Real Estate.

    Here in Sunrise, Alaska (A Old Gold'town near Hope, Alaska) we started buying land in 74' for $400.-- per acre. We are now sellers @ $55,000.-- per acre.

    We were selling acre lots in Girdwood, AK. two blocks from the original Chair lift for $9,900.-- per acre in 71' Today they are about $395,000.00 for those same one acre lots.

    The real GOLD is figure out where humans will want to live in 25 years, and buy there.

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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    The real GOLD is figure out where humans will want to live in 25 years, and buy there.
    Absolutely!!!!!!


    But getting out there & getting muddy & wet, working up a good sweat, all for the adventure of what MIGHT be in the next pan is a whole lot more fun(for me)!!!! :-)
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Default Please help me achieve vast wealth now

    I need the LAT/LONGS for lots of nuggets PM me the info :)
    I punched the last hot tip into my GPS and ended up at Fred Meyers jewlery :(

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    Don't want to be selfish with a PM. Everyone should have the same chance.
    Known nuggets here!
    Degrees Minutes Seconds:
    Latitude: 37-54'03'' N
    Longitude: 085-54'07'' W
    Decimal Degrees:
    Latitude: 37.9009687
    Longitude: -85.902028


    Good hunting my friend! May the adventure begin.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

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    Cool Yeah buddy!

    Quote Originally Posted by Vance in AK View Post
    Don't want to be selfish with a PM. Everyone should have the same chance.
    Known nuggets here!
    Degrees Minutes Seconds:
    Latitude: 37-54'03'' N
    Longitude: 085-54'07'' W
    Decimal Degrees:
    Latitude: 37.9009687
    Longitude: -85.902028


    Good hunting my friend! May the adventure begin.
    Uh Fort Knox?, thanx but no thanx I'm nervous just googling the place.
    Oh great because of vance i'm on the nepalitano hot list

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    Uh Fort Knox?, thanx but no thanx I'm nervous just googling the place.
    Oh great because of vance i'm on the nepalitano hot list
    Don't say I never tried to help...
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  11. #11
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If you want to get land to patent and mine on, there are some good resources out there the tell you how to do it.

    If you're looking for land to build a cabin on, google various Alaskan real estate websites and use the MLS to search land that is available.

    You can't just claim land as an excuse to get cheap land with no intent to mine it. You are best off finding existing claims that have been patented and are for sale. There is still money to be made mining, but you have to really look into the economics to find out what scale of mine will pay for itself, and what permits are required to opperate one.

    I did a fair bit of research on mining when we moved up 13 years ago, what I figured was with the basic pan and sluice I could hope to average minimum wage for shoveling gravel 8 hours a day after covering my expenses. Sure gold prices have increased, but you're looking at best $20/hr after expenses on productive but not steller ground. If you invest in more equipment your proffits can grow, but you need to have enough productive ground to justify the investment in the equipment.

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    Default the Mining Act of 1872

    My interpretation of the Mining Act of 1872 (that's the one that lets you make a claim on gov'ment ground) is that you can patent it (buy it, then own it, then do whatever you want with it without restriction other than normal laws of land ownership) is to PROVE that you can make a profit there, by mining it.

    15 years ago I predicted the demise of this Mining Act of 1872, and I still stand by that prediction. This will be rescinded within our lifetimes I think. There's too many large companies that don't want it to exist.

  13. #13

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    I have looked into this also here is some info on AK:

    MINING ON PUBLIC LANDS IN ALASKA

    More than 75% of the Federal land in Alaska is closed to mining because it is located in National Parks, Preserves, Monuments, Wildlife Refuges, or other areas withdrawn from mineral entry. Of the remaining lands open to mineral entry (staking mining claims) potentially valuable areas are often already claimed. So, the first step in staking a mining claim is thorough research into the land status to determine whether the land is available for mineral entry and whether it is already claimed.There are several steps to determine whether lands are open to mining:
    1. First you must determine the general area(s) in which you are interested. Information is available from the U.S. Geological Survey or other sources to help you find potentially valuable areas;

    2. The next step is to identify the legal description of the land. The Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land records in Alaska are based on the rectangular system of survey and kept on microfilm catalogued by Meridian, Township, Range, and Section. There are five meridians and approximately 18,600 townships in Alaska. The legal description (Meridian, Township, Range, and Section) may be obtained from the pertinent topographical map available for view in the BLM's Anchorage or Fairbanks Public Information Centers. Alternatively, the maps may be purchased from a U.S. Geological Survey (U.S.G.S.) Center;

    3. Once you have determined the specific location and land description, the BLM can then help you determine if the land is open for mining. Unfortunately, there are no definitive maps (other than the Master Title Plats (MTPs) for each individual township) that provide accurate depictions of land status suitable for use in staking mining claims. The MTPs are available for view in the BLM Public Information Center (note that mining claims are not shown on the MTPs but are listed in the BLM's computerized Land Information System);

    4. Finally, after determining the location and land status and before prospecting on the ground, we highly recommend that you do a search of the BLM Land Information System for any mining claims already staked in the immediate area and then review the location notices in pertinent casefiles to verify the location and avoid "claim jumping."
    BLM Fact Sheet - Maintenance and Location Fee Requirements

    WHAT MUST I DO TO MAINTAIN A CLAIM? Once a claim/site is serialized, an annual filing must be made on or before September 1, of each year to maintain the claim/site. If you have more than 10 claims, you must pay the $140 maintenance fee. If you have 10 or fewer claims/sites, you may choose to file either the maintenance fee payment or file the Maintenance Fee Waiver certification (a.k.a. small miners waiver). If you choose to file a small miners waiver, then you must also perform $100 worth of labor or improvements on all placers or lode claims during the assessment year (September 1, noon through September 1, noon). An Assessment Work Notice (Proof of Labor) form must be filed on or before December 30, along with the $10 filing fee per claim. For mill/tunnel sites, a Notice of Intent to Hold must be filed on or before December 30, along with the $10 filing fee per site. (43 CFR 3833.1-5 and 43 CFR 3833.1-6)
    WHAT IS A SMALL MINERS WAIVER? A small miners waiver is short for maintenance fee payment waiver certification. A small miners waiver may be filed by those claimants holding 10 or fewer claims/sites, instead of paying the $140 maintenance fee by September 1, of each year. If you choose to file a small miners wavier you must also perform assessment work and file an assessment work notice by December 30, of each year. (43 CFR 3833.1-6)

  14. #14

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    Laws seem the same as the lower 48.
    Patented vs. Unpatented sites:
    Many mining claims are held with patents. Patented mining claims are usually expensive and overpriced. They claim reserves but if there was truly anything worth working it would be worked. Most everything has been worked out of them. The benefit of a patented site is that you own the land outright and you can do what you want. The downfall of patented sites is you are liable for the mines. Clean up, environmental impact, attractive nuisance and public access problems. Plus donít forget your annual taxes on the land values, usually at least a few thousand dollars a year. All of this in on your shoulders if you own a patented claim. With a claim you have no liability for the public. If someone walks in and falls down your mine, itís the BLM that gets sued, not you. Existing Clean up and environmental issues are not your problem. With a plan of operations you can fence off your site to keep the public out as well. No taxes, just your annual assessment of $140 per year. The main detriment with a mining claim is that you cannot build a permanent structure on the claim. All buildings must be mobile, or pre-existing. Most large companies now days are looking to buy smaller sites since they haven't been commercially worked and still have values in them. These types of claims typically have been held by individuals instead of large mining companies. These sites are rare opportunities for investment, prospecting and land procurement. Hard rock mining has made many millionaires, but you don't make anything without rights to the land. This claim gives you full control of all mineral rights.

  15. #15

    Default Well, got my gold claim with a Cabin on it! Filed an APLM on the cabin!

    Gentlemen,

    Finally, the government works for me! Well, long story short, I was hunting down a road NO ONE wants to go down since it is over grown, was walking back up the 1 mile hill and saw a cabin we passed and never had seen before! I had NO IDEA i was on an old cat trail to a gold mine!!!! So, looked up the cabin, it's on state land, claimed the land and filed an
    APLM with teh state! Paid 150 bucks for the first year rental, then 50 bucks a year from here on end as long as I show improvements! Not a biggie, they want to rent out these abandoned cabins! So, followed the MAPPER and found the old strip mine, it has 4 more cabins on it!!!!!!!!! 3 are in decent shape, one is fine for storage, but all good workmanship from the 50's to the 90s!

    And, it was the BEST trap line around but was abandoned! So, I got it claimed also! Boy did I get lucky! So, really, I'm better off and alot cheaper than buying! I'll keep teaching renting through the district, build on a gold prospecting adventure, and, probably spend alot of money having fun!

    Learn how to run MAPPER, i found the OLD closed gold claims and followed the threads and they lead to several cabins that were filed 10, 20 years ago as trapping cabins and gold claim cabins and everyone had died that knew about them!...So, i'm searching out an old cabin on a river that connects to my trap line about 20 miles down a creek and found out from one of the old timers that the guy supposedly hit gold near there, but, died not longafter!....Hey, you never know!

    Thanks for the help!
    Scotty in the AK bush

  16. #16
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    If you find gold on the surface, panning, or heavy equipment, at what point are you considered a "miner"?

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    In general, if you extract a valuable mineral, and then sell it, you fit the definition of being a miner. Realistically though it is more about being engaged in extracting valuable minerals for profit. A prospector is a person who tries to discover valuable deposits, often just to sell them to a miner. Or the prospector may become a miner. I spend far more time being a prospector than being a miner.

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