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Thread: Cleaning Brass

  1. #1
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Cleaning Brass

    Thought I would use the phone a friend option and ask what type of media most are using to clean fired brass. I've been using corn cob in my vibrating cleaner, getting tired of cleaning the media from the flash hole/primer pocket.

    Is walnut better??? Maybe a combination of both???

    What say you??

    Steve

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I use corn cob. I just keep a dental pick handy when wiping the dust off as they come out and inpsect each hole.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    I've switched to Lizard litter walnut shell from Petco. The stuff I found is quite small and doesn't seem to pack up like the corn cob did for me. That and a spoonful of auto rubbing compound works good for me.

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    Default Liquid

    I use a liquid case cleaner. I have tried just about everything it is the easiest to use and does the best job.

    I don't know if you can use it in a vibrating case cleaner. So it may be neccessary to go to a tumbler. They are a bit more expensive but if you go to a rock tumbler like Thumler's Tumbler they aren't too bad.

    http://rock-tumbler.com/rotary.shtml

    Hope it helps

  5. #5

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    I use ceramic media for my pistol and black powder cartridge. For bottleneck rifle cases, I use a product called Krazy Cloth or some brake cleaner on a rag. I hear this ain't to good for your respiratory system though :-)
    "Everything that lives and moves will be food for you. Just as I gave you the green plants, I now give you everything."

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Walnut shells from Dillion along with a cap full of Dillion's rapid polish. Running in a home built tumber.

    Never have problems with media stuck in the cases.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

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    Try rice, it's cheap and large enough that it usually does not clog the flash hole.
    Oh, don't cook it first
    Tennessee

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    Member AKHunterNP's Avatar
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    I usually use a mix of walnut and corn cob. About 2 parts walnut and 1 part corn cob. works pretty good for me.
    "...arms like laws discourage and keep the invader and plunderer in awe...Horrid mischief would ensue were the good deprived of the use of them." -Thomas Paine

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Try rice, it's cheap and large enough that it usually does not clog the flash hole.

    Uncle Ben's, Saffron or Louisianna dirty rice?

  10. #10

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    I use corn cob in tumbler. You will be suprised at what a little water and a couple packs of kool-aid will do.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Picked up a 50lb bag of crushed, untreated walnut shell at the local sand and block outfit. Not sure what they use it for, but it cleans brass well.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Try rice, it's cheap and large enough that it usually does not clog the flash hole.
    Oh, don't cook it first
    Cook it later, and feed it to the Dawg??? I mean Cat????

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  13. #13

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    I'm a user of the lizard litter with a tad of additive as well. It has worked quite well and I have no complaints.

    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    I've switched to Lizard litter walnut shell from Petco. The stuff I found is quite small and doesn't seem to pack up like the corn cob did for me. That and a spoonful of auto rubbing compound works good for me.

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    Member raoul duke's Avatar
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    Question tumblers?

    im a couple years into loading, and still dont know why tumbling is necessary, or desired. using boiling water and cascade powdered dish soap i get my cases clean and pretty shiny, what am i missing out on? this is not a smart ass post i would really like to know.
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is final. You need to learn to be slow in a hurry! Wyatt Earp.

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    Quote Originally Posted by raoul duke View Post
    im a couple years into loading, and still dont know why tumbling is necessary, or desired. using boiling water and cascade powdered dish soap i get my cases clean and pretty shiny, what am i missing out on? this is not a smart ass post i would really like to know.
    It's like using a dish washer vs. hand washing your dishes. The more you do the more it makes since, just dump them in, turn it on, strain them out. I have mine on a timer so I can load and forget it for a day or whenever I feel like getting back to it. Also your method won't remove tarnish where a tumbler can and with no added effort or work on your part.
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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    I like walnut hull lizard litter, cheap, available, and that is usually what I run these days with a bit of 20 mule team borax mixed in.

    I have used a little of everything short of liquids at one time or another even chicken feed/scratch.

    Rice was fine but liked to plug flash holes for me. Short grain white worked best. Marshall, I never put in dirty rice but it comes out that way.

    Donít even think about cat litter it sucks! Makes a dusty mess, is way too aggressive, and wedges in primer pockets. Bad, very bad!

    Corn cob is good but too light in a rotary tumbler I think. It seems to just ride on top of the cases as they roll along the bottom.

    Pecan hulls are very good usually. I have had some that was not ground small enough and sticks in the pockets.

    The interesting things I see here is the liquids and have often thought about trying that angle. Also Koolaid as an additive, that one I will check out for fun if nothing else. So what flavor is best, grape, cherry, punch?
    Andy
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    The only reason for cleaning brass that you have fired and not let drop in the dirt is to make it look pretty. I use brass that I pick up from where ever I find it. Some is covered with mud and sand and such and I don't want that in my dies or in my gun. But for brass that you have kept out of the dirt, a quick wipe down with a rag is good enough. Unless you want it to look like new. I loaded for years without a tumbler and it worked fine. The dirty cases I just washed in soapy water to get the dirt and sand off and loaded them. Some didn't look very pretty but they worked. The tumblers clean polish and shine while your doing something else so why not? If you have really dark nasty looking brass then the liquid cleaners work good. I like Birchwood Casey's liquid case cleaner but there are other things that work too. And then a trip through the tumbler for a case that looks like new.

  18. #18
    Member raoul duke's Avatar
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    Default cleaning brass

    in a small mop bucket stolen from the wife, which has two hand holds molded in the bottom, i get great agitation by violently twisting it by the bail with the gritty dash soap. my brass is really clean, but not mirror shiny, thats good enough for firing, right? also how much heat, if any should i use to neck out 30-06 to 35 whelen?
    Fast is fine, but accuracy is final. You need to learn to be slow in a hurry! Wyatt Earp.

  19. #19
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raoul duke View Post
    in a small mop bucket stolen from the wife, which has two hand holds molded in the bottom, i get great agitation by violently twisting it by the bail with the gritty dash soap. my brass is really clean, but not mirror shiny, thats good enough for firing, right? also how much heat, if any should i use to neck out 30-06 to 35 whelen?
    Yup, that's goodanuf and then some. I like mine to look new but it's just looks, tarnish does not affect function what so ever.

    What do you mean by heat, annealing or fire forming? I’m guessing annealing since that’s a bit if a big fire forming jump. Using the cake pan method stand them in about an inch of water. Heat the neck as evenly as possible till they just begin to glow in normal to dim room light (not in sunlight) then tip it over. You only need about 500*f and this will put you in the 700-850*f range which works fine. In sunlight you will be way too hot before you see color risking melting. There are markers you can buy to tell you the true temp if you like.

    Here is an annealing kit that has temp compound.
    http://www.midwayusa.com/viewproduct...tnumber=360902
    Andy
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  20. #20

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    You should be able to neck up your brass (My guess - no experience) without fireforming by stepping up in increments first using a .338 expander ball then the .35 in the 35 Wheelen die.

    That Hornady annealing kit looks pretty slick, but if you have a socket set, you should be able to accomplish the same thing without buying anything new. Place socket mounted on an extension adapter (The guy in the videao uses a carraige bolt) into a drill, then place case in socket, then spin case in small propane torch flame until it gets "dull red" in low light conditions, then dump into bucket of water and repeate. It takes about 10 seconds per case once you get going.

    It doesn't get any cheaper or easier than this...

    http://www.longrangehunting.com/foru...g-cases-39987/

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