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Thread: 375 ruger Alaskan

  1. #1

    Default 375 ruger Alaskan

    I've heard the 375 ruger Alaskans are out and you can get one for around $ 550.00. Are these contolled feed? Sound's interesting. Short 20" barrel weather resistent 8# standard o6 action length.
    goldbelt

  2. #2
    Member barrowdave's Avatar
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    Default Price

    The suggested retail on Ruger's website is $1095. I sure wish we could get them for 550 but I am afraid that isn't going to happen. Especially with everyone chomping at the bit to get one! If you find one for that price let all of us know. Thanks,

    Dave

  3. #3

    Default 375 Alaskan Hawkeyes

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    Loc: Weatherford, TX Re: Ruger Hawkeyes Available!! [Re: DoeSlayer]
    #1150203 - 12/19/06 07:56 PM Edit Reply Quote Quick Reply




    Quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Scott,

    No, that's before tax...OTD would be $624.

    My sources show dealer cost on an African .375 Ruger to be $732 .

    Joe


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    None of the dealers that I am associated with have any of the Hawkeyes yet. My cost is anywhere from 495-500...If anyone wants one my pricing would be $550 + tax (in Texas) or $550 + shipping to your FFL if out side of Texas.....

    Of course this all depends on when Ruger ships to the distributors!

    Sactoller

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    goldbelt

  4. #4

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    I forgot to mention this was on the 24hourcampfire.com forum under hunting rifles.
    goldbelt

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    Default How much for a Ruger...

    There are two Ruger Hawkeye African rifles for sale on Guns America. One is $800 plus shipping, the other is for $999 at Gun Runners in Anchorage.

    Both are in the 375 Ruger caliber. There are dozens of Hawkeye rifles in all the other calibers for sale for around $600. There are a few 338 Federal and 358 Win calbers.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



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    Default

    Dealer cost on 375 Ruger.


    $731.85


    That is the blued or the Alaskan Diamondback finnish.

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    Default

    Dealer cost on the 358, 338 Fed and other MkII's Frontier in Target Gray.

    $590.59

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    Default

    Dealer cost on MkII SS in 358 or 338 Fed.

    $491.50

  9. #9

    Default .375 Ruger

    Goldbelt,
    I would be interested in the .375 at $550. I am in FTW. Let me know when they come in.


    Quote Originally Posted by goldbelt View Post
    Member


    Reged: 09/06/06
    Posts: 82
    Loc: Weatherford, TX Re: Ruger Hawkeyes Available!! [Re: DoeSlayer]
    #1150203 - 12/19/06 07:56 PM Edit Reply Quote Quick Reply




    Quote:
    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    Scott,

    No, that's before tax...OTD would be $624.

    My sources show dealer cost on an African .375 Ruger to be $732 .

    Joe


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------



    None of the dealers that I am associated with have any of the Hawkeyes yet. My cost is anywhere from 495-500...If anyone wants one my pricing would be $550 + tax (in Texas) or $550 + shipping to your FFL if out side of Texas.....

    Of course this all depends on when Ruger ships to the distributors!

    Sactoller

    Post Extras:

  10. #10

    Default

    Big Tex,
    Sorry about the confusion. That Price was posted by Sactoler over on the 24hourcampfire under the hunting rifle thread. Interested my self for that price so I'll keep my eye on it.
    goldbelt

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    Default 375 Ruger Alaskan

    The best price I have seen for the 375 Ruger Alaskan version was $825.

    I have seen MSRPs of $1095. Typically you can expect to pick guns up for $200 to $300 under MSRP

    I put one on order at the local gun shop. Now comes the wait.

    Read some threads, "everyone is worried about ammo availability for this caliber." My local dealer has the ammo and no gun.

    Good Hunting,

    KatzMO

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    Question 375 Ruger... What is it, anyway?

    I mean really?

    Just what makes a .375 Ruger so special other than it's NEW?

    Is it another one of these super-short short action cartridge based on a old 404 Jeffery cut-down to fit in a short action that can out do a .375 H&H? on paper?
    I mean really? Why? If you want a .375 to go to Africa get a Holland & Holland! don't settle for close to or almost on Dangerous game! Actually if you go to Africa and you are going to blast a big mean creature with horns and a mean temper, I recommend loads that most people would laugh and call small artillery rounds
    God, Guns and Guts is what made America Great

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    Default I don't want to steal your thunder, but

    I would agree with whateveri8. The ammo is easier to find and has a proven track record on beasts that would do you harm. You can Buy Double Tap ammo for the H&H with everything including a 350 Grain Woodliegh Weldcore pumping out almost 4700 ft/pounds. Just my 2 cents.....


    Ron

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    Default

    Well, ballistically guys, the 375 Ruger case will hold about 6 grains more powder and is in a standard action with the same bolt face and magazine setup as 338 Win Mag, 300 Win Mag, etc..., so it should work as well as the 375 H&H Mag. The availability of loaded is a good point though. I've got nothing against the grand patriarch, my next rifle I build will likely be one, but I can definitely see where the 375 Ruger has its merits.

    Ballistically the same (even a touch better), will fit standard length actions with a magnum boltface and not other improvements - just need a 375 Ruger barrel, bullets made for the 375 H&H velocities will perform perfectly in the Ruger case, a lighter and handier rifle. Those not wanting the Ruger rifle can ulitize whatever brand of standard magnum they want and have rebarreled. Easy as that.

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    Member whateveri8's Avatar
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    Default another .375 and lightweight actions

    .375 H&H
    .375 Remington Ultra Mag
    .375 Weatherby
    .378 Weatherby
    .376 Steyr
    .375 Nitro Express
    .375 Winchester
    .375 Whelen
    .375 Rigby
    .375 Hawk
    .375 RUM
    .375 Rimmless
    .375-284
    .375 JDJ
    .375 A-Square
    .38-XX WCF
    And the list doubles with the old time BP loads

    This is off the top of my head, There are many more out there in .375 so WHY do we need Ruger to make another 375 round to ultimatly end up on top the .375 Winchester pile of AMMO in the Discontinued Section?

    Look, if you want a "standard lengh" typically a Mauser or Springfield action length and a .375 bullet. Take a .338 case, blow it out to .375 and stick a .375 round in it and BANG! you got yourself a nice Magnum in a standard length action. Better yet, just keep that .338 mag for here in Alaska.
    For you guys that want that "4lb rifle" to fire heavy bullets and large magnum cases

    don't be suprised when it kicks like H - E - double toothpicks!
    God, Guns and Guts is what made America Great

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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by whateveri8 View Post
    .375 H&H
    Look, if you want a "standard lengh" typically a Mauser or Springfield action length and a .375 bullet. Take a .338 case, blow it out to .375 and stick a .375 round in it and BANG! you got yourself a nice Magnum in a standard length action. Better yet, just keep that .338 mag for here in Alaska.
    That is basically what Ruger did, except they took the belt off and gave it the case capacity lost due to the belt being there.

    Of the cartridges you listed, the only one that would fit a standard length action and was available commercially was the 376 Steyr. The rest of the standard length cartridges were wildcats. Ruger is just offering a commercial version. No reason to hate it, or fuss about them bringing it out. It's obvious you and I aren't going to buy one so what do we care? For those guys that like the Chatfield Taylor 375 or the 375 Epstein, and people do because people build them every year, well, now there's a commercial version.

    The old patriarch 375 H&H will live long, I'm sure of that. There's too many out there and too many fans. It's a low pressure round that feeds like greased ice. Now it has a cousin. No big deal.

    Like I said, my next build will be a 375 H&H, not a 375 Ruger. Although I can see it does have merit. I'd like to see it get necked down to 7mm myself and not by Remington.

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    Default 375 Ruger Alaskan

    Interesting talk guys. Thanks for all the advice. Thats the reason i joined this forum.

    To here real hunters talk honestly about what really works and what doesn't. No holds bared. Say what you think.

    I believe in the proven performance of the 375 H&H and I understand the ammo availability angle. If it were a year ago, I would have bought the 375 H&H, but now Ruger has put out a slightly better round than old reliable. I can't find myself buying something less for more money. 375 H&H vs 375 Ruger, Respectively.

    375 Ruger has slightly better performance than the 375 H&H and it cost less. The Alaskan version of the 375 Ruger is a very tough/durable design . Its corrosion resistant and, its durable hogue stock makes it a good option for extreme environments.

    I wan't something I can drop on the rocks and not damage it, a gun that can withstand wind, rain and freezing rain, a real work horse gun.

    Plus, this gun is american made by american workers. ya there is still some of us left.

    I have a local distributor for Hornady handy, and I will be able to get ammo if I want it. It will be expensive, but I probably won't put 20 rounds a year through the gun. In fact the distributor has the ammo, but Ruger hasn't delivered the gun.

    For the recoil. I can't remember ever feeling recoil when I made a shot while hunting. Usually its so cold you have layers of clothes on and your adrenaline has you so pumped up, you don't feel a thing.

    Another thing for us nonalaskans.

    You who live there are VERY fortunate, its a place only some of us can dream to visit once in our life. I have a 454 Ruger Alaskan revolver and I am going to have a 375 Ruger Alaskan soon. I guess it just fullfilling part of a life long dream for me. I just want a little bit of Alaska before I make it there, which may be never, but I am still hoping. But every time I hold the guns or shoot the guns, I feel closer to my dream.

    Thanks again,

    KatzMO

  18. #18

    Default ...

    Quote Originally Posted by KatzMO View Post

    You who live there are VERY fortunate, its a place only some of us can dream to visit once in our life. I have a 454 Ruger Alaskan revolver and I am going to have a 375 Ruger Alaskan soon. I guess it just fullfilling part of a life long dream for me. I just want a little bit of Alaska before I make it there, which may be never, but I am still hoping. But every time I hold the guns or shoot the guns, I feel closer to my dream.
    so very well said ...

  19. #19
    New member George's Avatar
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    Default 375 Ruger

    Guess I'm neutral on the 375 Ruger. If it is popular enough it will mean enough brass produced for long enough to supply future needs for a whole host of wildcats- I think Murphy brought up those possibilities a while back. I had the chance to look at the wood-stocked model today and the rifle really looks pretty good. The front sight is the banded variety and the rear sight is kind of a funky "quick acquisition" express type thing. Would have preferred a classier rear sight. The stock was nicely proportioned for a light rifle and has a fairly straight, scope friendly drop at comb. The stock seemed a little on the thin and light side for a 375 class boomer though. The safety looked fine but the thumb piece seemed a little too small- for large or ham-hands or with gloves. I had to really concentrate on getting enough thumb on it to go from rear full safety to forward fire position. All in all the Hawkeye seemed good to me but didn't into the guts of it like the trigger, etc. One note... I would suspect that in at least the model I looked at the recoil will be an issue for some shooters- it is a fairly light gun.

  20. #20
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    Default 375 Ruger

    I'm moving to Alaska soon, and I'm also considering getting a .375. I've been considering the Ruger Hawkeye Alaskan(.375 Ruger) and the CZ 550 American Safari Magnum(.375 H&H), which I've hunted with before and which I loved.
    I'm no expert on the subject, but I'm reading Dangerous Game Rifles right now, and Terry Wieland, who I believe is an expert, has a section of the book dedicated to the .375 H&H (which he argues is likely the finest hunting cartridge ever made) and it's so-called improvements, so I'll quote him...
    "The .375 H&H is both accurate and versatile, but beyond that it offers the paramount virtue in a dangerous-game cartridge: It is absolutely reliable. Case-sticking is unheard of, and in a bolt-action magazine rifle the cartridges feed like butter... It has a long, roomy case with a pronounced body taper and a tiny shoulder..."
    "In the case of the .375 (H&H), the taper of the case allows the cartridges to lie in the magazine angled slightly inward toward the feed ramp, and... this makes the cartridges chamber almost on their own."
    Wieland goes on to discuss cartridges which were shortened, widened, and reduced in taper in order to gain a ballistic advantage, while allowing for a shorter action to be used.
    "Usually the cases are blown out to maximize powder capacity, with the feeding problems and possibility of sticky extraction that result... In the 1960's, such a cartridge malfunctioned in Jack Lott's rifle, and Lott was severely injured by a Cape buffalo as a result. This led to his designing the .458 Lott - essentially the .458 Winchester (one of the "blown-out" cartridges discussed earlier) lengthened by three-tenths of an inch."
    Wieland goes on to argue that all of the reliable, old dangerous game cartridges have large capacities, low pressures, and distinct tapers. Therefore, if I am going to buy a .375 that may be used in the face of a charging brown bear or, worse yet, a charging Cape buffalo in Tanzania, where heat and humidity can also cause problems in a cartridge that doesn't have enough space inside, I am wary of going with the .375 Ruger, which is exactly the type of "improved" cartridge that is made to glorify a few ballistic numbers over pure, old-fashioned reliability. I think that the comfort of knowing that my cartridge is not going to stick when I NEED that reload is worth 200 extra bucks. Again, I'm no expert, but Wieland is, and I'll go with his opinion.

    Barron

    If anyone wants to read this source for themselves, here it is:

    Wieland, Terry. Dangerous Game Rifles. pp 144-149

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