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Thread: Palmer

  1. #1

    Default Palmer

    relocating from Minnesota, does the Palmer area have some good hardwater lakes?

  2. #2

    Wink

    As compared to Minnesota? Nope

    I think you might be seriously disappointed when you see the offerings. Stocked lakes that don't get stocked and a short ice season all makes for some not so good fishing in the immediate area of Palmer. But when you get a ways away, it can be good.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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  3. #3

    Default

    Are there destination areas for trips, permanants, wheelhouses, portables? Don't mean to question too much, but have lots of gear that may be better suited in storage?!?

  4. #4

    Default hardwater

    You'll never find the same enthusiam for ice fishing that you'll find in the States. I think the species/size available through the ice has a lot to do with it. Also, I can't say I've ever seen an Ice Castle or another wheeled house up here. Way too nice. Portables are certainly becoming more visible every year.

    Other than a handful of locals that ice fish I think the majority of the people who are out on the ice are transplants from the midwest. You'll make a lot of friends telling Ole and Sven jokes.

  5. #5

    Default

    Not necessarily a transplant from Minnesota, grew up in Seattle, met wife if Dutch, moved to MN for the past 6 years. Trying to shake the mid-western cliche', changed over all fishing gear to accomodate MN, too bad I sold all my west coast gear!

  6. #6

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by lekanoff View Post
    Are there destination areas for trips, permanants, wheelhouses, portables? Don't mean to question too much, but have lots of gear that may be better suited in storage?!?
    There are destination areas. To get to those, you will need to be self sufficient and self reliant. You need a plane or snowmachine, a sled and an auger. Plane is best, if you want to be back home every night or two. Very few use houses or portables, though there are a few. For the type of fishing you are used to, you will have to get off the beaten path and a good distance from the roadways. The lakes that you can drive a pickup to are small and get fished a lot, all year long. They have been overfished for decades, as there are only a handful of them and too many people wanting to use them. Access is a very limiting factor in Alaska, as you will learn more about, when you get here.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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  7. #7
    Member willphish4food's Avatar
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    Default

    All the doom and gloom! Sheesh! Don't let it get you down.. there are lots of places to fish. Just not as many places where you can drive a wheeled ice house to. Big Lake is the most accessible. Nancy Lake in the Willow area also has an ice road. Long Lake, up the Glenn Highway, can sometimes be driven on. These lakes all have some good fishing available.

    Good fishing can be a very relative term. It's not like fishing bluegill or crappie on a great day, but can be better than a poor day of panfishing. Big Lake is noted for big fish, but not many. It has unique regulations; no bait, single hooks, and only one dolly which must be 20" or better. Long Lake up the Glenn has hordes of small 10-16" dolly varden, some small lakers, and the occasional very nice sized laker or char (dolly). Right in Palmer, you won't find much water to drive a house onto, other than Finger Lake, but the fishing for small catchable landlocked salmon and trout can be very good.

    The weather's great this weekend. Get out and soak up some solar energy!

  8. #8

    Wink

    Quote Originally Posted by willphish4food View Post
    All the doom and gloom! Sheesh! Don't let it get you down.. there are lots of places to fish. Just not as many places where you can drive a wheeled ice house to. Big Lake is the most accessible. Nancy Lake in the Willow area also has an ice road. Long Lake, up the Glenn Highway, can sometimes be driven on. These lakes all have some good fishing available.

    Good fishing can be a very relative term. It's not like fishing bluegill or crappie on a great day, but can be better than a poor day of panfishing. Big Lake is noted for big fish, but not many. It has unique regulations; no bait, single hooks, and only one dolly which must be 20" or better. Long Lake up the Glenn has hordes of small 10-16" dolly varden, some small lakers, and the occasional very nice sized laker or char (dolly). Right in Palmer, you won't find much water to drive a house onto, other than Finger Lake, but the fishing for small catchable landlocked salmon and trout can be very good.

    The weather's great this weekend. Get out and soak up some solar energy!
    Yep,
    But...comparatively speaking, relative to Minnesota Lakes or what you can get into up here with a plane or snowmachine, I can't help but to consider your examples as being absolutely PITIFUL. Good fishing in my opinion always has to include good catching.

    Big difference between being forthright and honest with the OP or trying convince him he should be tickled with catching fingerlings and stockers. Most folks from outside envision Alaska to offer something more than what it really does. I was merely pointing out to him, that if he wants his dreams to be realized, he will have to get away from the roads and people. One should not expect to get into excellent icefishing in roadside ditches or lakes. It is all about access and how the lack of it will almost always result in sad faces or empty creels.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  9. #9

    Default

    Hey thanks, I'm by no means a newbey, off the beatnpath is always best, some lakes here are 2400 acres to 110,000 plus, so a guy has to travel on the lake by snowmachine poppin holes to locate biters, one bad decision and you'll be out in the dark 15 below weather, gps are a must. Metro area lake fishing open water or ice season is an option for the weekend warrior. Im not trying to compare midwest fishing to Alaska, totaly different monsters. I appreciate your comments and mean no distrespect.

  10. #10

    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by lekanoff View Post
    Hey thanks, I'm by no means a newbey, off the beatnpath is always best, some lakes here are 2400 acres to 110,000 plus, so a guy has to travel on the lake by snowmachine poppin holes to locate biters, one bad decision and you'll be out in the dark 15 below weather, gps are a must. Metro area lake fishing open water or ice season is an option for the weekend warrior. Im not trying to compare midwest fishing to Alaska, totaly different monsters. I appreciate your comments and mean no distrespect.
    Sounds like you'll do OK up here. Alaska's fish are slow to mature and proliferate, so you gotta go where there is very little pressure on them, if you want to get into good fishing. Lakes down south can recover much more quickly from over fishing. Most but not all of the roadside lakes in Alaska have been over fished for a long time and as a result, the F&G has resorted to having to stock them, just to appease the locals and tourists. Most of them would be sterile, if they didn't get stocked. You should seriously consider getting a plane when you get here, you can be into some fantastic fishing within an hour or two with one. A lot of Alaskan's don't take the time to do it up right and wind up settling for what is readily available and easy to get to, so if you are willing to go the extra distance you will be pleased, beyond measure.

    And....the regulations on the remote areas are less...way less.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  11. #11
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    Default

    I don't know what you are use to but I can name several lakes with in six miles of palmer where I have caught char and bows over 25 inches. If you are looking for pike, walleye and muskie you wont find any. As for hard sided ice houses people don't use them here with the exception of big lake. I have thought about it but I never fish the same lake. people have said we dont have a long ice fishing season but i am normally on the ice the first of November or end of October and don't stop till April and if you dont mind driving you can ice fish till my in some places.

  12. #12
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
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    Default

    Bring all your gear! Ice fishing is a great time up here. Don't listen to any doom and gloom. I know guys that catch a lot of fish! Google Earth is your friend. Look at all the lakes. Most have some sort of public access. Most have little or no hardwater pressure. Any that require a snowmachine or wheeler to get to get very little pressure. Most of the guys that I know will giggle if you have less than a 10" auger. If you have a soft side shanty BRING IT! Heater, bucket, etc..... There are areas with a few hardside shanties. Only a few.

    Mike

  13. #13
    Member wesak81's Avatar
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    Default location

    theres some nice bows in canoe lake if its open, i fished it in the summer with night crawlers, theres some big ones in it

  14. #14

    Default

    Why must you folks lead this guy on. There are NO FISH in alaska.

  15. #15
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Default

    I hope you have a job. My wife is an RN at an urgent care and she says they treat 10 new families (recently moved here) a day and they are all on medicaid and have zero prospects for employment. People think this place is thriving economically.....I got news for em.
    Palmer lakes have stocked fish, lots of fish&game cops runnin around, make sure you have your non-resident license w/ you

  16. #16
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    Default fish an game cops

    any state you go to in this day an age you will find F & G cops looking out for the interest of the state an for law breakers local an nonresident it is there job

  17. #17

    Default

    Hey guys, I understand downplaying Alaska, have lived there, family still lives in Anchorage and Dutch, just trying to have conversations with other fisherman but apperantly there is a keep out sign at the boarder.........

  18. #18
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default No way Lekanoff

    Quote Originally Posted by lekanoff View Post
    Hey guys, I understand downplaying Alaska, have lived there, family still lives in Anchorage and Dutch, just trying to have conversations with other fisherman but apperantly there is a keep out sign at the boarder.........
    You are an Alaskan. Welcome back and, yes, you will find fish worth catching. I hope your move back is a good one. You may miss out on much of the season, but come next year, tune in here and people will get you pointed in the right direction.

  19. #19
    Member zpoehler's Avatar
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    Default Ice Fishing AK

    Lekanoff,
    I moved up from MN 2 years ago and last winter ice fished about 7 days a month on various lakes just to get an idea what to expect. I fished almost every other day when I lived in MN(Bemidji area). This year i've been out about 8 times but a recent house purchase and puppy purchase have used up a lot of my time.
    The easier accessible lakes around here do get some pressure but it's not too bad, most of the time i'm out there are maybe 2 or 3 other houses on the lakes. One thing i've noticed that is unlike MN is it doesn't matter so much what time you are on the lake, bigger char and rainbows seem to be roamers and don't necessarily hold to a certain location on a lake and most of my bites come mid day rather than dawn and dusk. Usually if I sit out for a whole day i'll get a couple nice fish in the 18 to 22" range, biggest is a 28" rainbow, hardest fighting was a 26" char and both were caught within 15 minutes from palmer.

    I'd say I definetely lost some ice fishing interest since coming up here but I have yet to make it out to some of the more remote lakes, a couple good friends of mine recently got planes and we will be getting out after some pike and bows on the remote lakes.

    Bring your walleye gear, I sent almost all my panfish gear back to my brother in MN, a big rainbow will put a lot of pressure on a rod and reel and line. I usually don't fish deeper than 12-15 feet of water so I switched most of my reels from 6 lb fireline to 8 lb mono and fluoro.

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