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Thread: Randonee vs traditional

  1. #1
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    Default Randonee vs traditional

    What are the design differences between traditional alpine (resort) bindings and Randonee bindings?

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Randonee bindings allow for the heel to be released for skinning up the mountain, then locked again for skiing down. There is a pivot point in the toe piece so that the binding acts like a cross-country or tele binding while the heel is released. There are various forms of randonee (AT) bindings. Some are virtually identical to resort bindings with the previous exceptions, while others are more sparse in their construction to save on overall weight.

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    Thanks for the info.
    From looking at pictures I couldn't see where the hinge aspect was on a randonee binding. Why do tele bindings have a strap/cable around the back and randonee don't need this to keep the front of the boot firmly attached to the binding when free-heeling?

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Think of Randonee bindings as conventional bindings mounted on a plate, and that plate pivots about a pin at the front of the binding, and there is a device to lock the bindings down at the rear.


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    Ok, understood. But the randonee is not intended to ski free-heel as tele (only on the ascent)? Is the tele binding system is lighter than randonee? What does the the tele-style offer other than just a different method of skiing? What are the advantages of tele over randonee? Is it all personal preference and familiarity with traditional alpine gear/turning style?

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    You're correct that randonee skiing is not done free-heel on the decent. The heel locks in, so the skier can make traditional alpine turns. The advantages of tele gear is that it is lighter weight and generally more flexible for touring. I love my randonee gear for skiing if I'm just going up and down, but I'd really like to get a set of tele gear for touring. I've been ptarmigan hunting in the mountains with a friend a couple of times this winter, and his tele gear was much more pleasant for just cruising around than my heavier, bulkier, and less flexible randonee gear. That being said, I can smoke him on the way down the mountain if I want to.

    Really though, personal preference is a huge part of it. A lot of folks prefer skiing with a free heel. I've got great respect for those who can do it well, but I like my heel locked in place.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    You're correct that randonee skiing is not done free-heel on the decent. The heel locks in, so the skier can make traditional alpine turns.

    Look up the meaning. it's french for "can't tele".


    sorry...i was told that i shouldn't repeat such racial humor but i couldn't resist.




    for me randonee is preferred for mountaineering because it makes it quite a bit easier coming down when i'm exhuasted. and more fun.


    maybe cause some would say i Can't tele.

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    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default My approach is a little different

    I think of my set up at my sliding snowshoes. I don't really care about making the killer turns after climbing the mountain. My main goal is locomotion in deep varied snow conditions to hunt. So I have a pair of Alpina X terrain skis with Silvretta 404 mounted on them that I put my Koflach boots into. This is a very light setup. I carry a pair of skins but most of the time I can side hill up just about anything that I want to. Would I take this setup to the Steep and Deep. Not really. I can make turns on the way down but its not like im strapped in a pair of alpine boots. The best part about this setup is I can get in and out of the binding quite fast and once Im out I don't have a pair of storm trooper boots on I have a nice flexible mountaineering boot on. They even work with my Makulus but they work best with my Koflach Degrees. So far for the nice rolling hill of the interior that is a great way to get around and its very quiet.

    Oh and by the way I cant tele either... Unless you talking about a telephone.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

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    I like the sound of that. I already have Degrees... Are there any other bindings that would work with these Koflach Degrees? Silvretta don't seem to be highly available in my initial search.

  10. #10
    Member byrd_hntr's Avatar
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    Default Your right...

    Silvrettas are quite rare if your looking for a good used pair but they are well worth the money if you can find them. I think Alaska Hiking and Mountaineering has them in Anchorage if you want to take a look at them. There is a binding called an Alpine Trekker that I have seen but they are pretty cheaply built. But they might be a way to get started for a little less coin.

    http://www.backcountry.com/outdoorge.../BCA0001M.html

    I do have to caution you that this is great for moderately rolling terrain. But if you get into the really steep stuff you will soon learn why true Alpine Touring setups used tall boots. If your after a way to get out into the fluff without dragging snowshoes this is one of the easiest way I have found.
    I'm going to ctrl-alt-delete you so hard your mama's computer is going to reboot.

  11. #11

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    If you like skiing in the park, but want to do it in our back yard, go with the randonee set up.

    I went with the beefy marker bindings, not the lightest, but big DIN #s.

    Made it up Peak 3 this weekend in 1:30, and down in just a few minutes. If you like the trip down as much as the trip up, go randonee.

    If you can have multiple sets of skis its probably the best bet as you can ski the park all day long on them too.

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