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Thread: Catalytic heaters

  1. #1
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    Default Catalytic heaters

    I recently got a couple of the old but like new(one is new in box 1960's model) white gas flameless catalytic heaters. I have seen them on Aero Alaska for 150$. I heard that they work great in the field, if you put them in the cowl about 6 or 7 hours prior to starting. They are like 6 x 8 inches is size. Does anyone have experience with them.

    Terry
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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Terry View Post
    I recently got a couple of the old but like new(one is new in box 1960's model) white gas flameless catalytic heaters. I have seen them on Aero Alaska for 150$. I heard that they work great in the field, if you put them in the cowl about 6 or 7 hours prior to starting. They are like 6 x 8 inches is size. Does anyone have experience with them.

    Terry
    Yes! My experience with catalytic heaters goes back to the mid fifties, and extended into the eighties. They worked just fine under the cowling, and with a sleeping bag or engine cover to keep the heat in. Careful, 'cause there may be a hot spot atop the cowling! The cowling won't close, of course, since the heaters are pretty large compared to the closely cowled engine. Still, they worked quite well. They were also popular and effective with the small boat crowd. They give off no toxic fumes, so are suitable for inteior use, such as cabins, boat cabins, and/or tents.

    CAUTION: Don't put the heaters close to the engine until after the flames have died down, of course. But you knew that, right . . . . . ?

    Mort

  3. #3
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    They work great, and fit like a glove inside of some cowlings. No worries about the propane not being warm enough to flow, like on the SurvivalCats by Coleman, and white gas/kerosene is readily available in most places. Just don't use AVgas or anything else...

    They wont heat things up in a hurry, but they do a great job if left for a few hours (i.e. overnight) with a nice even heat. They run between 18-24 hours on a fill-up.

    It takes some trust to toss one under the cowl, right up next to fuel lines, etc... But you can pour a cap of kerosene directly on the mantle once its going, and it wont do a thing. Just let it burn down like Grizzly said, and you'll be just fine.

    Bob K.
    Anchorage, AK

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    Wink

    I would gladly take that Wham0 heater off your hands, they don't work very well at all.

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    I have one as well and wondered how much fuel to start it with. Cant read the label well and it looks like it says to use 4 cups but that doesn't seem right.

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    I've got 3 or 4 catalytic heaters. Whamo, Newco, and a Western. I use 4 CAP fulls (not cups) of fuel to get them started. Just enough to get the top of the heater damp with fuel.

    They work great as long as you plan ahead. I'd say a minimum of 6 hours. I usually put it in the cowling the night before, which is why I say plan ahead!!

    Also, make sure they are out before you toss them in the back of the plane with wing covers, etc. While you can pour gas on one while it's burning and nothing happens, I'd still be leery of a fire if touching combustible materials in the baggage compartment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Akcub49 View Post
    I've got 3 or 4 catalytic heaters. Whamo, Newco, and a Western. I use 4 CAP fulls (not cups) of fuel to get them started. Just enough to get the top of the heater damp with fuel.

    They work great as long as you plan ahead. I'd say a minimum of 6 hours. I usually put it in the cowling the night before, which is why I say plan ahead!!

    Also, make sure they are out before you toss them in the back of the plane with wing covers, etc. While you can pour gas on one while it's burning and nothing happens, I'd still be leery of a fire if touching combustible materials in the baggage compartment.
    The cover thaat comes with the heater is designed to snuff out the glowing wick. With the cover on, the unit should be safe for travel.

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