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Thread: Homemde Alcohol Stoves

  1. #1
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    Default Homemde Alcohol Stoves

    Anyone else using a homemade alcohol stove for their camping trips? I've always got one with me, sometimes as my primary stove, sometimes as a backup, but I never am without one

  2. #2
    Member EagleRiverDee's Avatar
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    I've got one. I didn't make it, I bought it on eBay for $8 or something...a guy on there has the dies made up and he makes pretty nice ones. It works well as an emergency stove. I use yellow bottle HEET for the fuel.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    They are great fun to build. I've probably built at least two dozen of them as I experimented with different configurations. The price of materials for those couple dozen stoves must add up to somewhere around 8 cents. Nearly everything you need is recycled materials from household trash. The "Penny Stove" is the best design out there. Only basic household tools are required.

    That said... got 'em, but don't use them as primary for camping. I consider an alcohol stove a good emergency stove where weight/space is a premium.

    HEET works fine, but for the price of a couple bottles of HEET, you can buy a large jug of denatured alcohol that will do a better job for a nicer price.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  4. #4

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    I like the idea of them but haven't used them enough to decide if I like them or not! I have a new trangia and a white box stove and they seem to work ok - I think my biggest challenge has been on how to keep a pot on them safely and securely. I do think they'd be a good car/truck stove in an emergency.

  5. #5
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Pot stand... use a 3-legged pot rack. Very easy to build and collapses down flat for transport. Look at the pictures of a couple different styles on this website...

    http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6

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    Thanks Joat for the link. That makes much more sense!

  7. #7

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    The Penny stoves look interesting. I have a couple minibull (pop can stoves) but will have to get a penny to compare. My experience on the minibull is limited to playing around home with it as I usually end up packing my Brunton Optimus Nova. The advantage of the little minibull is that it is wicked light...only .4 oz for the small one i have and .8 oz for the larger one I have. Looking on the minibull website, the guy has made some changes since I bought mine so the new ones may be even better. The main thing I think with these stoves I practicing with it before you get in the field and need it. Also it is a fun project to make stoves if you have time.

    http://minibulldesigncult.webs.com/

    There's also a lot of youtube videos on the minibull's

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