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Thread: gluing inserts

  1. #1
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    Default gluing inserts

    I just started building arrows. How should I prep the inside of my carbon arrows prior to gluing the inserts? There's some residue from the saw.

    Thanks

  2. #2

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    q-tip and acetone

  3. #3
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    It's also not a bad idea to rough up the inner surface so that the glue will hold better. They make a wire brush just for this, but a gun cleaning brush is better than nothing. stick it in & rotate it a few times.
    Then clean as KK mentioned (although I use rubbing alcohol).
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  4. #4
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    I wipe the whole arrow down with rubbing alcohol and leave ove night to dry.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  5. #5
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    Default Installing inserts

    I think I'd really stay away from acetone on a composite product. I'm by no means an expert on carbon arrows, having only built a few (aluminum is my choice) for family. The best advice I recieved on gluing the inserts and it works well is:"Heat the insert until when touched against a tube of the hot glue it melts the glue and adheres to the insert. Then put the insert into the arrow and while it is still hot, wipe the excess glue off." I tried it and it beat the epoxy glue we had tried on the first ones we glued. It has never let loose of an insert. (now watch all of them fall out since I bragged on it)lol
    Tom
    PS. All I've used is just plain water to clean the arrow. Again, you mileage may vary.

  6. #6
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
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    Just use Goat tuff. No need now to use the melting glue. I forget the other glue I use it's made by Arizona fletching. This stuff works great and dries really fast.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

  7. #7

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    Gold tip recomends acetone to clean the safts. I have been using it for 5 years no problems. I refletch my arrows about 3 times a season. I just get tired of the same ol colors. I use wraps as well. As for the glue you cant beat goat tuff. I have never lost a insert or a glue in nibb.

  8. #8
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    My wife uses gold tips and I've done the hot melt method. Works slickern then ice at 50 below. It does however let loose in tight bales or if you have a lip from your shaft to insert. Good thing she has alum's that work just as good.

  9. #9
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    Default Carbon Arrows

    Well, after reading the posts on this subject I did a little more research into carbon arrows (I knew there was a reason I still use aluminum). The bottom line is, do the research and use the method that the arrow shaft manufacturer recommends. It varies somewhat, but I still stand behind what I said about acetone. I couldn't find anywhere on Gold Tips site they recommended it. Most of the manufacturers recommend against it. Carbon Express recommends against it although they do say you can use MEK on a clean rag and wipe the old fletch area clean. Again, your mileage may vary.
    Tom

  10. #10

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    You should check out www.archerytalk.com and get some more info. Do a search on fletching and you will see what most people are using. Just in case I may have given you some bad info I checked all the carbon manufacturers websites to see if the recommend not using acetone. None of them did. Last year when I called Mike at gold tip about prep on my pro 22's he informed me about the acetone, he also said that 91% alcohol will work as well. The only thing he said not to use was rubbing alcohol because it contains oils which will be left on the shaft. I also have a good friend who is a professional arrow builder and bow-maker, he only uses acetone to prep and remove old paint when cresting arrows for customers.


    I did find it interesting that MEK was recommended because it has almost the exact chemical compound as acetone, as they are both Ethyl methyl ketone. MEK is just much stronger

    this is from Carbon Techs website http://www.carbontecharrows.com/Help...lean_prep.html

    To Clean and Prepare Carbon Tech Arrows
    After you have properly cut your Carbon Tech Arrows you need to clean all of the carbon dust from the outside and inside of the arrow shaft.
    Acetone works the best, it is strong enough to clean effectively, but not too strong to break down the arrow shaft resin. Stay away from MEK it could possibly too strong and break down the arrow shaft resin. (*Always use in a well ventilated room, and stay away from flames and smoking.)
    To clean the outside of the arrow shaft take a rag and pour a small amount of the acetone on it. Quickly clean off the arrow shaft until you hear it squeak. (That should be plenty clean)


    Fill a paper or plastic cup with about 1" of the acetone.
    Quickly dip the arrow shafts in the acetone one side at a time.
    Make sure that each side is dry before doing the other side. Lightly tap the ends of the arrows on a paper towel to remove excess acetone from the interior of the arrow shaft.



    You can take our advice with a grain of salt, but do some research on other sites as well. There is alot of good info out there. Keep in mind we're not soaking our arrows in acetone just a quick wipe

    KK
    Last edited by KenaiKing; 01-01-2007 at 12:31.

  11. #11
    Member akrstabout's Avatar
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    i never have built arrows. but use those cleaners in construction. denatured alcohol works the best on products. no resudue to worry about and not as harsh of a cleaner. dries super fast, evaporates. just another alternative to consider. can get anywhere like lowes etc.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the advice. I ended up using a new .30 caliber wool mop from my gun cleaning kit soaked with denatured alcohol to clean up the carbon dust. Glued in the inserts with Goat tuff. I'm ready to shoot my first dozen "custom" arrows.

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