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Thread: Cabelas tents

  1. #1
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    Question Cabelas tents

    i posted this in another area with no response----------a few weeks ago there were a few people that used Cabelas tents--------I will be in Kotz next Sept and would like an opinion on the EXT or Guide series tents---Can you use the vestabules on the Guide series? any opinions??

    Thanks for the help

  2. #2
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    the guide model will fit with a vestible, its the outfitter series that don't have one. i like the outfitter better, less stuff when you set it up, both are actually a really good tent. i use the XPG series four man and six man for all my clients and they love them. going on three years of hard use on my four man and its still doing great. i like the XPG because they are alot lighter than the guide or outfitter models and affordable should a bear work one over. which hasn't happened yet. but yes, i'd buy one and i will again. i like the six man XPG the best, you can stand up in it which is great. the four man is solid just like the outfitter and guide models.
    I haven't had any regrets, i coulda bought bombshelters for four times the price and triple the weight or arctic ovens for the same. but i've been really happy with my cabela's tents. only down fall is their "snag proof" zipper, it will catch, you just get used to how to open it.

  3. #3
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Love em

    I have used the Guide series ut of Kotz during that year of monsoon type weather. Held up great and I will never use another tent on any hunt, except sheep of course

  4. #4
    Member gusuk1's Avatar
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    Default cabelas guide tent

    also have been useing the guide tent and happy with them.a 4man with vestabule is a nice set up for two,for it allows out of the weather cooking area,have had mine in 70 +winds and held out.as brwnbr stated need to watch the (snagproof zippers).also would be wise to get a floor saver

  5. #5
    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    floor savers are a must in any tent that gets alot of traffic, great investment

  6. #6
    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    Default cabela's guide tents

    Guide tents are great for good weather in AK. They also hold up very well in bad weather and are great re: waterproofness. I have used a 6 man on several hunts up here. Had poles invert in and had to hold them a few times in EXTREME winds to ensure they wouldn't snap...but never had a failure.

    The issue comes into play if you get caught in EXTREME AK weather. If so, you would want to go for a tent with a lower profile and more angled sides to cut the wind vs trying to stand straight up in it.

    Like optics...buy the best you can afford.

    If weight and money are not an issue than go for the bomb shelters....they get rave reviews.

    I have also heard great things about the Eureka Outfiitter Assaults....the 4 man can be had on ebay for ~$250 new. They have 3 VERY thick aluminum poles and a lower profile than the Cabelas Guide tent. I have heard reviews from some guides up here that they are great as well.
    Psalm 18:34
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  7. #7

    Default Guide Model

    We used the 8 man guide model for a ridge top moose hunt last year. Loved all the room. It held up pretty good until it blew 40-50 knts for several days. Ended up breaking most of the fiberglass poles. Had to sleep in a collapsed tent until the wind let up and I was able to repair them. I was going to replace the poles with aluminum ones but changed my mind and ordered Bomb Shelter instead. We'll see how it holds up to the ridge top as I am going back to the same spot. Good Luck

  8. #8
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    Default Guide tent

    My last Caribou hunt out of Bethel in 2005 we used my 6 man guide tent and vestibule. That vestibule is tough I will tell you. We had some very high winds for several nights. Broke poles and put them through the fly of the guide tent. Vestibule never went anywhere. Was able to duct tape the poles to get through the hunt. Not one drop of water got in the tent as it was pouring rain the whole time too. They are good tents. Set them up in the middle of an alder thicket or somewhere out of the prevailing winds though.

  9. #9
    webmaster Michael Strahan's Avatar
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    Default Another Recommendation

    XMO-

    Though there are timbered areas north of Kotzebue, most notably along the Noatak / Kuguroruk confluence area, most of the area is rolling hills and open tundra. If I was going there I would not choose any tent with a ridge height above four feet. You never know what the wind is going to do up there and your shelter is the thin wall between you and the worst Mother Nature dishes out. High winds and high tent walls don't generally play well together. You will always run into folks who have had good experiences with them, but I wouldn't recommend them.

    There are several mountaineering tents out there that will comfortably accommodate two or three people and will do the job even in the worst conditions.

    I would also never choose fiberglass poles. As one person already pointed out, they easily shatter in high winds. In such conditions they can also lacerate your rainfly and tent body. If you run your hands along them (as most of us do out of habit), you get treated to a handful of microscopic fiberglass splinters that are difficult to find and extract. Go with aluminum poles.

    Finally I would look for a tent with lots of sturdy tiedown points at the bottom edges of the rainfly and at the mid-body height as well.

    I would not recommend the Bombshelter or any other cabin tent on most hunts north of the Arctic Circle- the country is simply too exposed. If you choose one anyway, at least bring along a low-profile backup tent just in case. No way to predict the weather up there, especially in September. You could be sorry if you go cheap.

    -Mike
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  10. #10
    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    Default North Face Himalayan

    Used the North Face Himalayan this fall in Kotz...we had winds 40-50 mph for 4 straight days. The tent never budged...can fit 2-3 guys with gear. Low profile. 6 poles, low profile, designed and setup to cut through the wind vs fight it
    Last edited by Jason in Anchorage; 02-14-2007 at 20:11.
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  11. #11
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    I second Jason on the North Face tent. I have a similar tent, only an older model and believe it would hold up to anything AK can dish out as well as a smaller three season North Face. I've also spent some time in tough weather with a Mountain Hardware. They use these things on Denali for a reason. Go with a North Face or Mountain Hardware or another quality brand of a four season low profile tent. My North Face has LOTS of tie down points. You have to buy extra pegs to use them all unless you're tying them to brush. Another good idea is to set a heavy rock on the tie down at the peg in the ground. If the wind starts howling and things develop slack problems will arise.



    -Carnivore

  12. #12
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    Smile

    Thanks for the help--------the reasons for the questions are: I have considered the North Face Himilayan 47-----it is 58" tall in the center as is the 4 person Guide model, I keep hearing about low profile and it seems that Cabelas tents are as low as the "Bombshelter" and others. Is it the quality, number of tiedowns or what that makes these an unlikely purchase? The question about the vestubule was for the cover for cooking, gear etc. Money is naturally part of the equation but I would rather spend a little more and be "safe" and dry------Its hard to tell your buddies that you saved a few hundred when they rolling across the tundra in a "cheap tent"

    Thanks again

  13. #13
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    My North Face tent isn't the easiest to set up but there's no tent I'd rather be in when the weather gets really nasty. For milder weather I take an REI geodesic dome tent. Easy to set up, taller, roomy, and still light enough to carry.

    Bomb Shelters are the best big tents made, period. Tough as nails but heavy. I stayed in one for a week of high winds and wet snowstorms that left several inches of wet snow clinging to everything. No problem for the Bomb Shelter. I don't need a tent that big. If I did, I'd have one.

    I avoid anything that has Cabela's name on the tag. I've been nothing but disappointed. In fairness, I've never tried their tents. I'm not about to either.

  14. #14
    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    Default weight

    TNF Himalayan 47 pictured only weighs in at about 16 lbs...that is good when considering you may have weight limitations. Its tough as nails. For 4 guys...I would have 2 of them.


    I bought mine brand new on Ebay for $455...they retail for $699
    Psalm 18:34
    He trains my hands for war, so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.

  15. #15
    Member Jason in Anchorage's Avatar
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    Default another pic

    here is another pic...we had this tent out in the open on a plateau...the wind blew steady 40-50 mph for 3-4 days straight. We had some pretty strong gusts during that time as well.
    Last edited by Jason in Anchorage; 02-14-2007 at 20:11.
    Psalm 18:34
    He trains my hands for war, so that my arms can bend a bow of bronze.

  16. #16
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    Luxury, electric fence and camp chairs to glass from. I've stayed in a Cabela's Guide model in pretty bad weather, rain and wind, with no problem. The tent wasn't mine. I have a Eureka and a Coleman Peak 1, both are three person tents with room for two and gear. Both hav held up well in very poor weather. I've had no problems with Cabela's and they have an excellent customer service policy if something went wrong.

  17. #17
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    If you're going to buy a Cabela's Alaskan Guide tent, call and check as they were running a special. Otherwise, I'd wait a little while. I've got good intel. from a buddy there that the Alaskan Guide tents are being improved and he heard something about vestibules being included with the tent... Spring catalog should be out any day and verify that.

    Cabela's tents are great. I know the amount of torture testing they do and wouldn't hestitate to stay in one.

  18. #18

    Default Cabela's in Kotz

    We hunted Kotz this September and my buddy's Cabela's Guide tent treated us well. The wind was constant, but nothing severe. It rained pretty much non stop though. The tent kept us dry.

    I'd have to agree that I'd go with a lower profile 4 season mountaineering tent next time. Another guy on our hunt brought a 4 seaon Mountain Hardware tent. That one worked perfectly and seemed indestructable. I can find the model name if you're interested.

    Chinookee2004, I sent you a PM about your '05 hunt in Bethel.

  19. #19

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    I got my Cabelas spring catalog a little while ago. The new guide tents do have an integrated vestibule. KL

  20. #20

    Default Mountain Hardware

    As far as Mountain Hardware tents go, I can reccomend the 3 person (2 and gear), four season Trango 3.1. This tent along with the North Face tents is the tent of choice in the most extreme mountaineering environments.

    I have used and owned both brands. I prefer my mountain hardware --just little touches like pocket placement and a little quicker to set. It also has two vestibules. One of which is very large for a mountaineering tent. I have seen this thing in 55+ mile and hour winds with hard rain. It remained tighter than a frog's *****. Maybe I like it more because it is a more recent purchase. The thing is you do not stand up, walk around in, or set up a wood/coal stove in them. They work where there is no cover, and pilot/guides like them because they ar relatively light.

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