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Thread: Breathable Waist Highs for Moose

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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Default Breathable Waist Highs for Moose

    I am planning on a trial this season. Waist high breathables instead of hippers. I have used Lacrosse Chiefs for almost twenty years and have only one issue with them - sweat. I sweat more than any one person should; after one day of humping hills or tundra my hippers are soaking wet and they will not dry on a normal 10 day hunt. Removing them wet is a bear. I have done quite a bit of research on these boards concerning this.

    I have tried numerous methods of drying the Lacrosse in camp - none of which work worth a darn. Anyone with suggestions on drying these in camp. I doubt that the newspaper trick with be effective as wet as I leave them.

    I have hunted part time in breathable chest waders during floats and while they're hot and sweaty, they tend to dry out pretty easily. I figure hunting in the waist highs would eliminate the need for rain pants (two pair since I always carry backup). I've used Korkers with hard rubber lugs to climb hills in the chest waders and I think this may work.

    I wonder are there any waist highs with booties that aren't neoprene or maybe very thin neoprene. Seems the only downside is hiking in the neoprene booties.

    Anyone who hunt in these have suggestions or pointers?

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    Just another way to skin the same cat. I use Neos River Trekkers, they are light enough to keep rolled up until you need them. I either roll them down to let my legs air out or remove them all the way, when I'm sitting and glassing. You can wear your normal hiking boots with them, just make sure to try them on over what ever boots you will be using them with, when you don't need them take them off and roll them up and throw them in your pack. I'm on my second pair, had issues with my new pair, but their customer service was great and they replaced the defective pair.

    Link to a thread on their use.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...highlight=neos

    Steve

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    Member Antleridge's Avatar
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    Default Neos

    What do these weigh Steve?

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    The camo ones are about 5 lbs a pair, the green one a little less.

    Steve

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    Default Simms

    I have done all my guided hunts for moose, bears, and even late season goats in Simms G3 waders. In my opinion you can't beat them. They are tough, dry quickly, and when used with a good pair of wading boots provide ample ankle support and traction. They also act as the ultimate rain pants for sitting and glassing or sitting a boat as your butt doesn’t get wet. Numerous times I have been in situations where the extra height provided by the waders has come in handy. Another guide, I, and two clients were chasing down a moose on the peninsula when we came to a little stream and while they hiked up and down looking for a shallow enough place to cross, I was already on the other side. They have also been nice on the large tidal flats in Southeast when hunting spring bears. Another issue I have with hip waders is when hiking against the current in water; it is really easy for the wave that builds up in front of your let to start splashing in your boot.
    I would say their one disadvantage is it is much harder to take a leak with waders on. I would highly recommend getting the Simms G3 Guide Pant or the G3 Convertible. They are pretty expensive but well worth it, I can get two years of guiding out of a pair. The last pair I sent to their customer service department was DESTROYED and they sent me a new pair for free. The pair before that they wouldn’t replace for free, but they did sell me a new pair for 50% off. Good luck with your season.

    Ben

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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaGilles View Post
    I have done all my guided hunts for moose, bears, and even late season goats in Simms G3 waders. In my opinion you can't beat them. They are tough, dry quickly, and when used with a good pair of wading boots provide ample ankle support and traction. They also act as the ultimate rain pants for sitting and glassing or sitting a boat as your butt doesn’t get wet. Numerous times I have been in situations where the extra height provided by the waders has come in handy. Another guide, I, and two clients were chasing down a moose on the peninsula when we came to a little stream and while they hiked up and down looking for a shallow enough place to cross, I was already on the other side. They have also been nice on the large tidal flats in Southeast when hunting spring bears. Another issue I have with hip waders is when hiking against the current in water; it is really easy for the wave that builds up in front of your let to start splashing in your boot.
    I would say their one disadvantage is it is much harder to take a leak with waders on. I would highly recommend getting the Simms G3 Guide Pant or the G3 Convertible. They are pretty expensive but well worth it, I can get two years of guiding out of a pair. The last pair I sent to their customer service department was DESTROYED and they sent me a new pair for free. The pair before that they wouldn’t replace for free, but they did sell me a new pair for 50% off. Good luck with your season.

    Ben
    Like Ben, I also have found more protection beneficial, especially on my float and coastal bear hunts. Last year I started using breathable stocking foot chest waders with a zipper in the front. The zipper makes it nice when you have to answer natures call. I have been using Korkers wading boots with interchangeable soles. The felts works great on slick rocks and the mud lugs work for off river.

    I often will take these and my Neos and use which ever works best.

    If you ever use chest waders with a zippered fly, you will find it hard to go back to the non-zippered ones. When these wear out I'm going to replace them with the Simms G-4s with the zipper. Make sure that your wader boots fit and are not too tight, tight boots will cause your feet to stay cold while in the water.



    Steve

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    Default if you go with the old hip boots

    use a large garbage bag over your foot & lower leg. duct tape the top to your pant leg. you're still gonna sweat, but the bag will keep the boots dry.
    Gary

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    Default Where?

    Quote Originally Posted by Gary View Post
    use a large garbage bag over your foot & lower leg. duct tape the top to your pant leg. you're still gonna sweat, but the bag will keep the boots dry.
    Gary
    Do you do this? Would the bag go under your socks? I would think that plastic on the outside would cause sliding inside the boot.

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    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Wading boots

    My first time on a Kodiak deer hunt I wore my chestwaders and Chota wading boots, and while this arrangement was better than what the other guys were using to climb (Xtratufs) by the end of the hunt the stitching on the boots had been blown out by all the sidehilling and stress from climbing.

    So, if you're doing much hiking and climbing in your chestwaders you might need to buy an oversized hiking boot to slip on over the neopreen booties on the waders.

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    To answer your question; yes, there are waist high breathables made with waterproof socks that are not neoprene. Here is a link
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...05&deptid=1173

    I haven't tried these yet, but plan to on a 2 week rock crawl/hike/fish trek into the wind river range this summer. I too have used my Simms for brush busting/hiking (montana and Yellowstone). They did not hold up well. I like Simms waders, but believe if you are going to use breathable waders for this type of utility, you would be better served by using Patagonia watermasters.
    NRS also makes breathable "Dry Pants" that are very durable, but without booties. These may be worth considering if you use a "Dry Sock" (Seal skinz, etc) and tuck them under the ankle gasket of the dry pants. This would allow you to use your regular hunting boots and keep your feet dry.
    A good pair of Kennetrek gaiters would give you added protection from forefoot to knee.
    Just my .02

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    I can't wear hip boots due to the fact that I can't find any that will go over my big legs in size 10. So, I always have hunted in chest or waist waders when hip boots would normally be required. My non-breathable Cabelas chest waders with rubber boots are every bit as confortable to me as a set of extra tuffs and rain pants..so that's what I wear if I'm not walking far..and I never walk far for moose.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Smile Thanks!

    Quote Originally Posted by Grits Hardway View Post
    To answer your question; yes, there are waist high breathables made with waterproof socks that are not neoprene. Here is a link
    http://www.nrsweb.com/shop/product.a...05&deptid=1173

    I haven't tried these yet, but plan to on a 2 week rock crawl/hike/fish trek into the wind river range this summer. I too have used my Simms for brush busting/hiking (montana and Yellowstone). They did not hold up well. I like Simms waders, but believe if you are going to use breathable waders for this type of utility, you would be better served by using Patagonia watermasters.
    NRS also makes breathable "Dry Pants" that are very durable, but without booties. These may be worth considering if you use a "Dry Sock" (Seal skinz, etc) and tuck them under the ankle gasket of the dry pants. This would allow you to use your regular hunting boots and keep your feet dry.
    A good pair of Kennetrek gaiters would give you added protection from forefoot to knee.
    Just my .02
    Thanks Grits; I will give these a try.

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    Let us know how they work (Pro's & Con's). It might end up being a good solution to an age old problem.
    Grits

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    Frogg Toggs is making a breathable wader pant. Anybody have experience with them?

    Link: http://www.fishusa.com/Frogg-Toggs-H...de-Pant_p.html

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    Yeah, STP has them on sale for next to nothing, and if you purchase when they have one of their 30% off deal e-fliers going than they are even cheaper. My understanding is that they are made from spunbonded olefin and are very durable, breathable and water proof. Also, very, very light. It would probably pay to have at least 2 pairs in the bag given the price. I forgot all about those.
    Grits
    Oh yeah, they come in a sort of psuedo- camo pattern, too!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grits Hardway View Post
    Yeah, STP has them on sale for next to nothing, and if you purchase when they have one of their 30% off deal e-fliers going than they are even cheaper. My understanding is that they are made from spunbonded olefin and are very durable, breathable and water proof. Also, very, very light. It would probably pay to have at least 2 pairs in the bag given the price. I forgot all about those.
    Grits
    Oh yeah, they come in a sort of psuedo- camo pattern, too!
    I can't find them on the STP site. They must be out of them. If anyone sees them for less than the usual $89 please post the info!

    Thanks

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