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Thread: Remington 700 bolt hard to open.

  1. #1
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Remington 700 bolt hard to open.

    My wife's Remington 700 Alaskan TI bolt has been hard to open after firing since we have owned it. Some loads would eject better than others. I had no other signs of high pressure, although hotter rounds would make it worse. Did it with both factory and reloads.

    I got to thinking that the chamber might have some rust, carbon, or something causing the brass to stick. I just got done looking into the chamber with a borescope, the chamber has two bad scratches in it. One in the shoulder area and the other along the side.

    I'm pretty sure once I polish these out, that it will fix the problem.

    I was going to use a bore mop and JB bore cleaner and a rod with a drill and just go slow and have a look, and continue until it is smooth.

    I also thought about cutting the neck off a old piece of 270wsm brass and thread the end, coat it with JB and use the drill to polish it that way.

    Ideas???????

    Steve

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    Are you seeing any scratches, dings,dents, bumps or other abnormalities on the fired brass. I assume that loaded rounds chamber and come out easily if not fired.

  3. #3

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    Good questions from rbuck351.

    Have you really cleaned the locking lug recesses? Anything in there will produce the same symptoms you're experiencing, too.

  4. #4
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rbuck351 View Post
    Are you seeing any scratches, dings,dents, bumps or other abnormalities on the fired brass. I assume that loaded rounds chamber and come out easily if not fired.

    Yes, there are scratches on the fired brass. Unfired rounds will chamber and eject without issue.

    I used the bore scope to inspect the entire bore and locking lug area. Everything else is clean and smooth.

  5. #5
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Right track

    Steve, I think you are on the right track - if you use the drill method definetly use it at low rpms and do not over heat the area you are working on. I think that will do the trick. I usually wrap a smaller brass brush with very fine steel wool and use a lot of elbow grease on a DRY chamber when I polish my rifles, then finish with a good lube.
    I shot clay targets competitivly now for years - when the foreign ammo made the markets it caused some problems. One of those is that they use a lot more steel in the mix in their shotshell mfg process, and if there is the slightest rust, dirt, scratch etc in a chamber the empties will stick if the gun is made to tight tolerances as the steel cases expand upon firing. I have spent many hours keeping bores polished and I would assume your rifle bore will react the same way. I know that some of my rifles do not like the wolf steel cases in .223.
    Randy

  6. #6

    Default It Sounds Like a Warranty Item to Me

    I would take the rifle to Wild West Guns in Anchorage and talk with them about it. It sounds like a rough chamber to me, which would be a factory warranty issue. Take a couple of fired brass with you to show the scratches. Wild West has sent in a rifle for me before, and Remington made it right with no problem.
    Regards,
    Jim

  7. #7
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    Default

    If your not real familiar with what your doing, you probably should get it looked at by a warrenty place. WWG or whoever does the factory warrenty work.

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