Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: 358 Norma loads

  1. #1

    Default 358 Norma loads

    Sorry I'm a noobie here on this site, and have posted a few things on the 358 Norma Magnum in other areas of the site that should be here....I will leave them as they stand I don't know how to move them..... SO I will start with the things I have found in my local area and see what you all would recommend ......358 Norma Mag 250gr Noslier Partitions , I have Hodgdons H414 and IMR 4064, I am still looking for RL 15, but with what I HAVE IN HAND.......what would you recommend.......any experience with these or should I go back to the drawing board LOL.....Thanks......

  2. #2
    Moderator
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Location
    Midwest
    Posts
    4,431

    Default

    H4350, RL-17, both very good powders for 250 grains in the 358 Norma. Your 4064 and H414 are both a little fast burning for that caliber/bullet weight.
    Is there nothing so sacred on this earth that you aren't willing to kill or die for?



  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    I haven't used rl17 but the 4350s work very well. The powders you list are to fast but would work for varmit loads using 358 pistol bullets. They will gernade on contact though.

  4. #4

    Default

    Modern Reloading by Richard Lee lists a load range from 70-74 grains of H414 for a max vel. of 2754 fps for a 250gr bullet. I have not experimented with this load but it is slower than H4895 which I have used quite a bit and has been the best powder for my shorter barrel.

    Could some of you more experienced guys tell me why the IMR 4064 and H414 are too fast, when there are faster powders listed in several load data sources for 250's in the .358 Norma?

    I am not at all saying you don't know what you're talking about so please don't take it that way. I am really trying to learn. I am still relatively new to the reloading game.

  5. #5

    Default 358 norma loads

    Glad you mentioned that, I have the nosler book, but could only find H414, I would add that Months ago I was lurking around this site and found the H414 and H4064 mentioned quite often, I have since lost the loads I wrote down, and now not a mention of it......Of course That,s a powder I do have, I am sure some body's got H4350 around... I am still curious
    RL is listed as the most accurate, any Ideas?? is that considered a fast or slow powder??

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Eureka MT
    Posts
    3,048

    Default

    Google powder burn rate. there are several charts that list powders in order of burn rate. The charts vary a little in the order of which powder is where but will give you an idea of burn rate comparisons. RL is the Reloader series of powders and there are several. RL 10 12 17 19 and a few more. The higher the number the slower the burn rate. Certain powders work better in certain case, bullet weight combos than others. H414 being to fast does not mean it won't work it just means that a slower powder will give higher velocities without excessive pressure. The different 4350s are very close to just right for the 358 Norma and the 338Win using 250gr bullets. There probably a few powders in the same burn rate area that will work just as well. As bullet weight goes down, usually a faster powder will work better. But that's the fun of loading your own. Finding a combination that gives the accuracy and velocity your wanting.

  7. #7
    Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks
    Posts
    301

    Default

    Speer #14 shows a 250 grain IMR 4064 load:

    start: 61 grains @2458
    Max: 65 grains @ 2638

    This is about 100 FPS slower then there fastest load which uses IMR 4350.

    Hodgdon also shows a load with H414 on there web site, which is a nice source for data.

    http://data.hodgdon.com/cartridge_load.asp

  8. #8
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Here is the Hodgdon burn rate chart, note that it only has brands they own. I have never found one chart with all the available powders (donít think one exists) so use a bunch of them to cross reference between.
    http://www.hodgdon.com/burn-rate.html
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

  9. #9

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ADfields View Post
    Here is the Hodgdon burn rate chart, note that it only has brands they own. I have never found one chart with all the available powders (donít think one exists) so use a bunch of them to cross reference between.
    http://www.hodgdon.com/burn-rate.html
    Burn rate charts are a bit of a mystery to me. I mean I understand the information that's not the mystery. The mystery is the fact that different charts will have powders in different orders.

    I do have a couple that have most if not all BRANDS of powder on them but they will leave out particular powders for some unknown reason. As precise as this hobby and industry usually are, it just surprises me.

  10. #10
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Missing Palmer AK in Phonix AZ.
    Posts
    6,416

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by evandailey View Post
    Burn rate charts are a bit of a mystery to me. I mean I understand the information that's not the mystery. The mystery is the fact that different charts will have powders in different orders.

    I do have a couple that have most if not all BRANDS of powder on them but they will leave out particular powders for some unknown reason. As precise as this hobby and industry usually are, it just surprises me.
    I wish they had a numerical rate assigned to each powder, or some sort of speed range system myself, but till then charts are as close as we get.

    The order depends on who compiled it, where they got their info, and when their sources acquired the data. All this makes them somewhat like the end result of the “pass it on” game, where I tell you, you tell someone who tells another and when it gets back to me the facts have all changed.

    Someone takes charts like the Hodgdon chart and adds it to charts from other makers to make a complete chart but there are cross over powders of the same rate . . . now he makes a judgment call on what order to list them. Over time powder batches change some because of slight changes in the chemical components made in their batches so the rates of the powder changes over time. All these things can mean they are out of actual order on any chart . . . even the making company’s official chart. So, burn charts are just a rough guide not an exact order but that’s all we need really.

    When I use them I’m looking at a zone of maybe ten powders, five above and five below the one I’m comparing to. All ten should be close in rate and work in similar cartages so all should be workable alternates for each other, want faster look more to the top group and slower look at the lower ones. Then I drag out the books and compare them in the data, mull it all over, and pick one to test.

    When shopping and they don’t have “X” powder using the chart improves my odds of getting a workable replacement, had some happy accidents this way and come home with a one that worked better. Someone says hay have you tried ???? pouder it’s great in my !!!!. The first thing I do to start to get to know it is hit the burn charts and see what its comparables are.

    Burn charts have lots of flaws but also are useful time savers. Hope I helped more than confused.
    Andy
    On the web= C-lazy-F.co
    Email= Andy@C-lazy-F.co
    Call/Text 602-315-2406
    Phoenix Arizona

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •