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Thread: newbie help

  1. #1
    Member AkGreg's Avatar
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    Default newbie help

    good evening folks,

    I was wondering if I could get some of that collective wisdom out there on snow machining... I am new to it and have been struggling a bit with steering the darn thing at slow speeds...

    I have a 2001 two person ski-doo 440... so its pretty light and I know I need to lean and use body mechanics to help inlfuence where it goes... BUT it seems to need a HUGE area to be able to turn in a 180 or god forbid a 360 turn..

    thoughts? ideas??

    thanks in advance

    Greg

  2. #2

    Default

    It is usually the result of one of two things or both. Too little Ground Pressure on the Ski's or worn out skegs with missing carbides. Some skegs don't have carbides but even they should be beefy, more than half the diameter of new ones. You can adjust the Ski Pressure by adjusting the rear suspension fore and aft at the limiters/limiting straps. Not sure about your specific model, but you should be able to google it or look at an owners manual. One other thing, after market ski boots, often affect the skegs in a negative way.
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  3. #3
    RMK
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    Default The trickiest adjustment

    Steering adjustment is one of the trickier elements of snowmobile set up. There are a bunch of factors that affect steering.

    As Akres mentions, ski pressure is one of them. You can have too little, or too much. Each sled is a little different, but generally it can be controlled by adjusting the limiter strap (as he said) as well as adjusting the pre-load on your front shocks assuming that you have the adjustable kind.

    Skis are not supposed to be mounted exactly parallel with the axis of the snowmachine. They have a prescribed amount of "toe out" as called for by the manufacturer. Improperly mounted skis can add to the darting problem.

    Bent carbides can mess you up. The design of skis causes them to "follow" grooves in the trail. This will cause your carbides to bite in, and follow existing ruts. This also causes "darting" that can take the fun out of riding.

    This is why I hate trail riding. Jump in the fresh powder, and you wont suffer from this. Unfortunately, a trail is often the only option. There are a lot of after market skis that claim to be the answer.

    You need to track down a manual. You can always do some research on this with the snowmobile magazines. They often have articles on ski mounting. Jump on you tube and you will probably find videos showing how to make the limiter strap, pre-load, and toe out adjustments.

    Good Luck with it. Note my photo....if the skis aren't on the ground, they can't cause you grief.

  4. #4

    Default

    I was havign a problem with the steering on my Summit on my first ride this year. I adjusted the limiter strap and flipped my front shocks, adjusted my forward skid shock and it made all the difference.

    Anyone know the best way to fix a twisted ski? I hit a tree going down a steep hill and it bent the plastic pretty good. I looked it over pretty good and saw no other damage other than to the ski.

  5. #5
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    Default You might...

    try the GENTLE application of heat from a heat gun or even a hair dryer. Warming it may bring it back to it's original shape. Something about the length of the molecular chain length and memory. Use caution and do not allow it to get any hotter than "warm to the touch". Allow time to take the place of "more power, argh, argh"...patience, dude, patience.

    The guys at C&C Plastics in Wasilla are good source of information about plastics and their properties.
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  6. #6
    Member lynch's Avatar
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    Default

    Sounds like your main question was not set up but, if it was all that has been said sounds good. If you were just asking about learning control
    I suggest practice. Go find some powder and do turns till you are tired rest and turn some more. some times a little more speed helps alot. there are to many ways of turning to get into here but there are alot of tutorials on youtube that are helpfull.
    "Bark,bark,bark,sniff,sniff,bark,and bark" - Lynchs Blue Roan Lynch E.C.K.

  7. #7
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by AkHunter45 View Post
    I was havign a problem with the steering on my Summit on my first ride this year. I adjusted the limiter strap and flipped my front shocks, adjusted my forward skid shock and it made all the difference.

    Anyone know the best way to fix a twisted ski? I hit a tree going down a steep hill and it bent the plastic pretty good. I looked it over pretty good and saw no other damage other than to the ski.

    Alaska Snowmobile salvage usually has used skis for almost any machine at a good price, might be worth a check...

    Also, for the steering question, a lot of it depends on the surface you are riding on: ice, groomed trail, 6" of powder, or deep powder. In deep powder you will hardly steer
    as you will be using body weight to move the sled around. Worn out carbides could be your problem, or not enough ski pressure. Try leaning over the hood of your sled while trying to turn it, puts more weight on the carbides so that they grab more. If you want to check the condition of your carbide, just tip the sled on its side and look at them, they should look similar to the edge of a piece of angle iron, they are easy to change if dull, usually just a couple bolts.. Do you have aftermarket skis on the sled or no?

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