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Thread: must have mods

  1. #1
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default must have mods

    I had started another thread about buying a aircraft but a couple of comments brings me to start another.

    What would you say are required mods for something to use in the bush to include off pavement and floats? Please share your reasonings and if you are experienced with the costs, please share those as well.

    I'm trying to learn as much as possible to avoid any costly mistakes or buyer regrets. Thanks for the help.

  2. #2
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    Default

    Nice to have mods:

    Clean paper work. Bigger tires. Beefy nose wheel fork or Beefy tail wheel. HD landing gear. Safety Cables. VG's. Removable back seat. Belly pod. Flat prop. Flaps. More Horsepower. More Fuel. More Training. More Practice.

    JB

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    Default jrb gets it right

    jrb pretty much sums it up. Put most of your emphasis on the last item he mentioned, it is, undoubtably the most important.

    Define the mission you want a plane to do beforer you shop. There's no point in buyin a cub if you want to fly your family around, or a 206 if you want to bounce around in the tundra. Each airplane has it's own needs and wants for "necessary" mods. Figure out the plane first, then the add ons, then shop, with the help of a qualified mechanic.

  4. #4
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default

    1.More horse power.
    2.Less Weight
    3.More experience....

    Everything else is just extra stuff,,,
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  5. #5
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default make sense

    I appreciate the responses and they make alot of sense. The problem is being such a rookie and not really knowing the right questions to ask so I'm trying to learn. I was posing the question this way so when I'm looking at different planes and they are stating that it has this or that I can get an idea if I need or want it and what its worth or if something that is missing that I will want or need I can figure that into what I will be spending.

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    Thumbs up Also

    Here's a bit of advice you won't hear very often. It is WAY easier to buy an airplane than it is to sell one!!!!!


    Don't be in a hurry.

    Define the mission you want to fly, first, then you can start looking. Get rides in as many planes as you can.

  7. #7
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default this is all good advice

    The above post hit it all. First figure your money out. then your intenions of where and what you intend to do. be realistice with the mission. Don't plan on flying a heavy loaded plane into a 600' strip or for that matter out of the same strip with low time. usailly your first plane isn't the only one you will have as you will find what you like after you start exploring.

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    The best mods a new or low-time pilot can ask for is a flexible work schedule that allows him time to build hours and unlimited funds to feed the airplane. New guys don't need "bush" mods. They need to learn how to manage their skills and decision making. The most important piece of equipment in the airplane is the pilot.

  9. #9
    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Default nice but..........

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    The best mods a new or low-time pilot can ask for is a flexible work schedule that allows him time to build hours and unlimited funds to feed the airplane. New guys don't need "bush" mods. They need to learn how to manage their skills and decision making. The most important piece of equipment in the airplane is the pilot.
    Sounds like sound advice and I appreciate it but it doesn't help or answer my question. The basis for the question is to help look at needs and wants and to help with the decision process on a plane to buy.

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    My advice is to buy your first airplane with the intentions of building time and selling it. Nothing holds it's value like a 172 so that's a good one to consider. Learn to fly. Learn the weather. Learn when to stay home. After you've been at it for a couple of years you'll know what you want, where to get it, and who to ask to teach you how to use it. The old cliche about a PPL being a license to learn is the God's honest truth.

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    Default Got to haves

    I would have to add a Garmin 495 GPS, with permanent antenna, and A lightspeed Zulu headset.

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    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    Default Experience

    Tboehm
    I agree with Mr Pid – experience will get you in and out of more places than VG’s or a bore prop. There are plenty of old timers out here who can work a pacer, t-cart, or a champ into the same places you see some lower time pilots with 150K cubs.

    If you would like my suggestion as to the best thing I THINK you should have its Out Of Control flight training to include full stalls, spins, approach turn stalls and cross control departures. Your plane will talk to long before she kills you in a “Moose Turn” stall (approach turn stall)

    Drew
    Last edited by Toddler; 02-20-2010 at 08:32. Reason: speelling
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

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    Default ideas

    Just a few thoughts on my experiences...
    1. don't try to buy the perfect plane at first, just learn to fly in something easy and low cost to build time
    2. buy a tail dragger so you will learn to use your feet - this is just a suggestion. I went from tricycle to taildragger and thought I should have done taildragger direct. This is just my personal preference..
    3. buy something simple and cheap to fly...like a champ, pa11 or j3..these are also relatively slow and docile. You will have a lot to learn about flying and off-airport work and these examples do relatively well and are great platforms to jump from
    4. make friends with high time good bush pilots...steepen your learning curve and learn from their mistakes. Listen to everything they say and do what they tell you.
    5. fly A LOT and constantly work at perfecting everything....turn dead-head time into a learning experience...on the way home I do
    everything from trying to absolutely perfect turns, to emergency procedures
    6. go up with someone that is a good instructor and learn the performance limits of your airplane..than means taking it to the edge, spending LOTS of time in transition phases (in air and on the ground), etc. This includes lettting it fall into spins from all configurations and learning to recover with minimal altitude loss on desired headings.
    7. fly, fly, fly....and always keep an open mind and a learning attitude..

  14. #14
    Member BeaverDriver's Avatar
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    Default

    T, Start with the aircraft safety mods - safety cables, shoulder harnesses, move the mag switches on a cub, seat stops on a Cessna etc.

    Then, if you are like the rest of us, (not independently wealthy) mods are going to come one at a time for you. I suggest that the first ones you install are those that will allow you to survive if you make a mistake. Survival kit, SAT phone, and a new 403 ELT would be a start. Then Radios that will get you out of un-forcast or unexpected weather troubles - mostly here I am talking Garmin moving map. These would be a start and would help you stay alive to build up the time and experience you need to discover other mods that will pair with your experience.

    Those next mods -STILL- will help you to survive. At this level I would investigate larger tires and SKIs for winter (for unexpected off airport landings) - maybe a 206 nose fork and 800 tire for a 172. Then, as you pick up experience the larger tires will allow you to go places where you may need increased lift such as STOL kits, or more HP etc.

    After that I would look for the convenience things. Steps, handles, battery on the firewall, bubble windows, hatchback or extended cargo bay, long range tanks or belly tank etc.

    Mostly, the cheapest mods you can find are between your ears. Learn to use each mod to its fullest extent with safety and emergency's in mind. Then move to using it for the increased performance or off airport landings for hunting.

    Most of all, think and study. Think always about your route and where you are going to land when the prop is standing tall. Think about turning around and how you will do it using the moving map - and when. Think about your limits for each and every flight and how you will best use the mods to get you and your loved ones on the ground in one piece. That's what I use the mods on my 180 for.

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    Default

    I think the best mod that I have is vg for my tcraft. Marc n43643

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    Default I forgot

    Was going to get a STC on this one, but the process cost to much. Take a piece of string and tie it to your strut, let it hang down about 10.324 inches. Then frey the hanging end about 1.75 inches and you have a great wind sock. You will always know which way the wind is blowing even if its light.

  17. #17
    Member algonquin's Avatar
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    Default after putting one down off field

    After putting one down off field I guess I would go for big tires and VG's. The VG's enable you to control the plane real slow, which is real good, the tires keep it from sinking into the muskeg, removing the gear and flipping on its back. The other mod I think of as a must have is shoulder harness'. Those three thing will save your butt. Mostly everything else would be nice to have stuff. As far as instruments go if you don't have basic AI,T/B,VSI,DG in good working you are limited to very local area flying. I know there are guys flying W/O instr. all over Alaska but then again there are volumns of acident reports of guys flying all over Alaska w/o instr. Me I just never liked playing with gernades w/o pins in.

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    Default Mods

    I was thinking about mod's for my 7 GCBC on a Citabria website and this is what I came up with.

    Just wondering what mod's people have on their 7 GCBC's. I've seen some I dont have and they are:
    1. A X brace like in the top of the fuselage like a cub
    2. Removal of the aluminum gap seals on bottom of wings in front of ailerons(not to sure about this one).
    3. Carl Bohns, Super cub style landing gear (they wont approve any more until he gets it STCed)
    4. Larger rudder (really considering it)
    5. Light weight interior panels (really considering it)
    6. Baggage door (will install when I have to recover)
    7. K & N air filter (probably get in April during Annual)

    This Ones that I have:
    1. Light weight motorcycle style battery on fire wall
    2. Light weight starter and alternator
    3. Wide deck, 160 horse/125 SMOH, (with motor mount and valve covers paint to match beautiful blue landing gear)
    4. 29" tires
    5. 80 inch prop
    6. Vg's
    7. Scout Landing gear(With major fuselage strengthening, FAA approved 2009)
    8. Double puck brakes
    9. Milman spars
    10. Gar Aero tail wheel
    11. Lexan seaplane door
    12. Custom winter fronts
    13. Custom dash mod to install air gizmo for my garmin 495 and extra 12 volt source for my ipod

    I also have all needed instruments like AI,T/B,VSI,DG,VOR,GPS for acrobatic flight

    Plan on installing metal bottom for repair, maintenance and inspection during my annual in April.

    Currently in process of building stronger rear seat with removable back, for loading and unloading.

    These are just a few ways to waste money on my plane, but every plane can have its list.

    Terry

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    Default

    For acrobatic flight, don't you want a G-meter in there someplace?

    As for the shoulder harness mentioned above, better make that the aerobatic seat belt and shoulder harness. MUCH tougher, and even easier to deal with.

    As they say - - - - - just my two-cents worth ................

  20. #20
    Member Toddler's Avatar
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    Default Prop

    Terry
    do you run the 80 inch prop on skis? If so I need to copy your idea

    drew
    Normal people believe that if something ain't broke, don't fix it. Engineers believe that if it ain't broke, it doesn't have enough features yet.

    Scott Adams

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