Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 28

Thread: Alaska Meat Company

  1. #1
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Alaska Meat Company

    I came across this business on Craigslist. They package meat you can keep on the shelf. They are based in Kodiak. I ordered one each of everthing to give it a try. www.alaskameat.com.

  2. #2
    New member
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    ANCH.
    Posts
    488

    Default let

    us know if it's any good. I also saw the add and wondered about thier products.

  3. #3
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default I will

    I thought it might be good to take in the back country to use as an emergency or for a meal or two. It's kind of expensive but needs no refridgiration

  4. #4

    Default

    Thanks for the post alaskabushrat! It is interesting for sure. One thing I wondered was the longterm storage life of their products. I like to see Alaskan livestock and agriculture businesses grow. Hope they are successful.

  5. #5
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Well

    Quote Originally Posted by 377PFA View Post
    Thanks for the post alaskabushrat! It is interesting for sure. One thing I wondered was the longterm storage life of their products. I like to see Alaskan livestock and agriculture businesses grow. Hope they are successful.
    I will see. They are just starting up so, it will depend on the flavor and shelf life if it is worth the money. Hopefull it will arrive this week.

  6. #6

    Default

    Sounds good. Keep us posted on what you think.

  7. #7
    Member alaskabushrat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    I presently live and work close to Lake Clark
    Posts
    150

    Default Well

    The meats arrived today and I ate one pkg. of the beef sticks and to tell the truth, they were not any better than what we can buy at Costco plus, you have to refridgirate the beef sticks. Then for dinner I tried the stew beef which is fully cooked and can keep on the shelf. It was kind of salty and kind of tasted like the beef you get in Dinty Moore. Here is what I bought:
    1 pkg. 8oz. Natural Beef Steak-$6.98
    1 " 5oz. " " Snack Sticks-$5.49
    1 " 8oz. " " Beef Stew Meat-$5.98
    2 " 12oz. " " " Summer Sausage-$13.96
    1 " 12oz. " Mild Jalapeno Beef Sausage-$7.49

    With the shipping it came to $55.60

    Not really worth the money. Oh well, a lesson learned.

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    If you're looking for a stout sausage that needs no refrigeration, and is more than filling, the traditional landjaeger sausages from 'Bavarian Meats' (retail store located at Pike Place Market in Seattle) are the ULTIMATE hunting sausages.

    They can go two weeks or more without refrigeration, are a traditional 'hunter stick,' were still the old price of ~$9.95/lb the last time I checked (about a month ago), and they'll fill and ship a flat-rate priority mail box for you for about $10.00 in frieght for the smaller of the two boxes, and $14.00 or so for the larger flat-rate priority mail shipping box, plus the cost of the sausages. You get between 9 and 12 sausages per lb., as they're smoked to a consistency that's about as moist as a really nicely done (dried) Italian hard salami.

    You can chop them up and put them in a soup, add them to potato hash (preferably with some onions, carrots, garlic, spuds, etc.), munch them plain on the trail or in the tree stand, and probably barter your way out of a variety of tight spots with them, too. ;^>)

    The link to their web page is:

    http://bavarianmeats.com/

    Their land-line tel. # is:

    (206) 441-0942

    As an additional bonus (for you talkative types, or for those bushy bachelors longing for someone to put up with their rambling in casual discourse) there's a strong liklihood your clerk will be one of a number of wonderful young German women working there, most of whom are very knowledgable about their products.

    When I can afford it, these are in my travel kit. Probably more beneficial than a space blanket..

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the report AlaskaBushRat. That is disappointing. But don't know until you try. Thanks for the update. The landjaeger's are pulling at my German heritage heart strings! They sound good.

  10. #10
    Member muskeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hollis
    Posts
    963

    Default good meat

    I think it is a good alternative and addition to the Mountain House / Backpackers Pantry freeze dried menu.

    The Steaks and Stew meat are Ok and it is great that no refrigeration is needed.

    I tried the meat and it's doable. I like the pouch which is burnable and the meat heated easy by backpack stove in water.

    To heavy for backpack style hunting for me but will work on my beach camp type hunt. Where I don't like cooking smells and don't have ice that lasts that long and the way it's sealed up there is no smells. Usually just go freeze dried menu and this will be a welcome addition.

    I also ordered some Hunter Sticks from the Pike Market place to give them a try. In a heavy German Accent she said they will last 6 months with refrigeration just kept cool.

  11. #11
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    >>>""In a heavy German Accent she said they will last 6 months with refrigeration just kept cool. ""<<<

    Yeppers!! Laying on the counter, they're good for ~ 2 weeks; the U.S. Postal Service did me the (un)favor of proving that point when they took about 11 days to deliver a priority mail package from Bavarian Meats that had originally made it from Seattle to the Anchorage USPS sorting center in a mere 18 hours, only to be 'misplaced' at the Fbks Airport sorting center.. (Thanks, guys!! .. Not...)

    If you're looking for 'odor-free' meats for hunting in bear (or other scavenger) country, then the landjaegers might not be the ticket for you, though double-sealing them in food-saver (or comparable) bags of good quality is one method of containing the awesome smell they generate.

    Just remember that like traditional king strips, they're absent a WHOLE lot of moisture, lost in the drying/smoking process; it's pretty easy to eat too many of them, and have them expand in your belly. Of course, there's worse sources of pain to complain about, I'm sure. ;^>)

  12. #12
    Member muskeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hollis
    Posts
    963

    Default vaccum seal

    When I get em I will vac seal em into individual packs.

    I make up a snack pack for my hunts .... with a candy bar, energy bar, nuts, chips, cookie / craker, fruit roll, hard candy or two, like a small peppermint patty (tootsi roll) or two and a meat stick / jerky and vaccum seal it all in small packs. Everyone gets one a day.

    Our camp stashes are always sealed up in dry bags and hung up.

    I'll see if these german hunting sticks work for that.

    It's good to have the varity goen on ......

  13. #13
    Moderator bkmail's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Palmer, AK.
    Posts
    4,115

    Default landjaegers on Palmer/Wasilla hwy

    I hate to support MatValley meats, but they stock them.
    On the far left side of the counter, they were $9-/lb but jumped to $11- or $12- when the new owners took over.
    BK

  14. #14
    Member muskeg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Hollis
    Posts
    963

    Default got them

    I received my order of 'hunter sticks' from Seattle .... the second day after ordering them by phone in the afternoon. One day in the mail ....

    They are good and the lack of need for refrigeration should make it work for me ...

    I'll be vacuum sealing them individually today.

    Does any one know if freezing them is OK for storage ? Will freezing them change them in any way ..... that is after vacuum sealing.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    I've simply thrown them into a tight food-grade plastic bag, and left them in the freezer for however long I've needed to... But I'd be lying if I claimed to know the maximum time of storage they'll last that way.... They've always been consumed within the first month or so at our house. ;^>)

    Frost-free freezers (whether above a fridge, or stand-alone) cause dehydration of nearly -anything- you put into them that's not sealed air tight, so all of our freezers except for the one attached to our refrigerator (and there's a passle of them) are manual defrost types, so I don't have to worry about further dehydration at a rapid rate.

    I'd use a pliable vacuum seal bag and food sealer on them, with most/all of the air sucked out, keep them fairly cold (I keep my freezers around -10 these days), and doing thus you should be able to leave them frozen for however long you wish, with basic time limits of a year or two if they're sealed properly and kept cold in a manual defrost-type freezer...

    I've had both vac sealed or double-wrapped beef, moose, and fish last as long as three years with no freezer burn in our freezers, but that depends on there being -very- little air inside the package, and the stuff wrapped pretty tightly.

  16. #16

    Thumbs up Moose landjaeger's

    Moose landjaeger is outstanding and needs no refrigeration. Best of all I make it myself.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    If you're looking for a stout sausage that needs no refrigeration, and is more than filling, the traditional landjaeger sausages from 'Bavarian Meats' (retail store located at Pike Place Market in Seattle) are the ULTIMATE hunting sausages.

    They can go two weeks or more without refrigeration, are a traditional 'hunter stick,' were still the old price of ~$9.95/lb the last time I checked (about a month ago), and they'll fill and ship a flat-rate priority mail box for you for about $10.00 in frieght for the smaller of the two boxes, and $14.00 or so for the larger flat-rate priority mail shipping box, plus the cost of the sausages. You get between 9 and 12 sausages per lb., as they're smoked to a consistency that's about as moist as a really nicely done (dried) Italian hard salami.

    You can chop them up and put them in a soup, add them to potato hash (preferably with some onions, carrots, garlic, spuds, etc.), munch them plain on the trail or in the tree stand, and probably barter your way out of a variety of tight spots with them, too. ;^>)

    The link to their web page is:

    http://bavarianmeats.com/

    Their land-line tel. # is:

    (206) 441-0942

    As an additional bonus (for you talkative types, or for those bushy bachelors longing for someone to put up with their rambling in casual discourse) there's a strong liklihood your clerk will be one of a number of wonderful young German women working there, most of whom are very knowledgable about their products.

    When I can afford it, these are in my travel kit. Probably more beneficial than a space blanket..
    thank you my friend for i have been looking for some good old fashion German meat company ..i was starting to go crazy for some old fashion blood sausage with seasoning to make a dish i been craveing ..

  18. #18
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    You're welcome, henry2.

    I don't/can't eat sausage as compulsively as I once did, but it's still a staple for any outdoor activity here, and sometimes between them, too.

    ----

    Predator Control, Do you have a home-spun or handed-down recipe you'd be willing to share, or are you using kit spices, etc.?

    I spoke at length one day with the fellow in charge of the smoking and production at Bavarian Meat's plant, at a separate location from the Pike Place Market retail store. I inquired specifically about cured pork, and making raw pork safe for fermented or 'cultured' sausages such as a true landjaeger.

    'Bob' (I think that was his name, anyway) informed me there were/are two methods recognized by the FDA for curing pork; one was to hold the meat at 150 degrees fahrenheit for 'X' amount of time, and the second method was to freeze the meat at specific temperatures for specific times. There was a range of acceptable temperatures, but the higher temps required longer curing times.

    The method using heat robs some of the fat and oils from the later smoking process, negatively affecting both the flavor and consistency, so (it's my understanding that) most traditional sausage makers prefer the freezing method for cured and cultured sausages that use fresh pork.

    There was a fellow in Fbks area not too many years ago named Wiley. He ran Greatland Sausage. There were times that I believed there to be a 'fluctuation in quality control' there, but over all, he made some DYNAMITE moose landjaeger most of the time. I wish he were still around and making the stuff these last few years.

  19. #19

    Default Moose landjaeger

    Yes I remember wiley and his landjaeger, it was good thats why I started to making it myself. He moved to Paxton and is the cook at the lodge, at least he was last year. I dont think he made his landjaeger the old fashion dry cured way. You can make it with a low heat also but it ends up a different product, but still comes out great. This last batch I made came out really good but I mistakenly let the heat get a little out of control and the internal temp of the meat got up to 135 in my smoker. The recipe called for heat no greater than 80. The old style dry cured way requires the right environment conditions to safely dry the sausage in a slow controlled way. I built a drying chamber and learned all the science behind it from the Len Poli web site. http://home.pacbell.net/lpoli/ Everything you need to make all types of dry and fresh sausage can be learned here. Also this site is a great wealth of knowlege if your into this sort of thing. http://forum.sausagemaking.org/ But remember this is not a hobby to just make due or take shortcuts. You need to take the time to learn about the proper meat handling methods and understand the theory or you can get someone very sick or worse. All that said I was able to build a drying chamber for very little cost by following Len's instructions and have had great success with it so far. You can see in the photo that big black ball, thats a moose bresoala. Its very good sliced super thin on crackers cheese. And those 5 white (moldy) things hanging up toward the back in the photo above is moose salami, they are maturing nice and should be done next weekend. These have been hanging in my chamber since march 24th. and have dehydrated about 40%. The Salami is 50% pork 50% moose, the landjager is 75% moose 25% pork. I freeze my pork but the whole trichinosis scare is a bit much. Only 1-2 people a year in the USA get trichinosis from grocery store bought pork a year. But better to play it safe. Good Luck... PC
    Attached Images Attached Images

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    Interior Alaska
    Posts
    893

    Default

    We'll be right over!! (Just kidding....)

    When I was a tiny youngster, a couple of years before kindergarten even, we lived in rural Wisconsin. At that time there were a notable number of German immigrants in the area. There were also quite a number of small-scale family-run cheese farms and old-style sausage producers/outlets; both were often located in the 'basements' of dairy barns, built into the field-stone and mortar foundations. Seeing -real- summer sausage (the old style thuringer) and hard salami hanging in basements until they were nicely dried and covered in white mold was a relatively common thing.

    There was an older German woman who lived by herself next door to us. We called her "Gramma Glinke/Glinkie." My sister and I would walk over to her Hansel & Grettle-style cottage, braving the much-feared pincher beetles, and she'd chat with us, act as a stand-in grand-parent, give us various candies, and sometimes share sausages, etc. with us. Nothing in the commerical grocery stores today even comes close to comparing with the sausages and cheeses we had available back then.

    On occasion I've had bulk cheese and sausage shipped up from a small cross-roads cheese and sausage store or two that aren't too far from there, where they still make a more traditional (drier and 'tangy') summer sausage. But if a person really wants it dried like it was in the Old Country, to the point of hosting the tell-tale white powdery mold on the casings, they'll likely have to do that bit for themselves; too much time anymore for commercial folks to dedicate that kind of space.

    I think I've been to at least one of the sites you posted, though it was in the past, a few years ago..

    I built a good sized walk-in smoker with lots of insulated and screened vents (high and low) for cross-drafting, to control both the smoke density and heat. A removable panel with various fittings in the rear of the thing permits the capacity to have cold smoke piped in from an outside wood stove, or hot smoke provided by an internal wood stove. It's insulated and vapor barriered, and is, essentially, a three-season smoker. My guess is that I could rig it to do well for much of this purpose as well, though old fashioned wood heat has a bell curve naturally built into its burn cycle, and requires a lot more tending than more conventional/electric-fired, better-regulated smokers.

    Yes, I was aware that the trichinosis in today's pork is less and less of a concern, but you're correct; it's a lot like Russian Roulette. You may not get the loaded charging hole, but then again, you may. No need to chance it.

    Thanks for all the information.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •