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Thread: A new(doubtful) rig for bank fishing?

  1. #1
    Member AlaskaIsCold's Avatar
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    Arrow A new(doubtful) rig for bank fishing?

    So I was thinking about some rigs that I could use for fishing streams and rivers since im starting to branch out into baitcasting and spinning. and I came up with this idea (see image [nothing is really to scale i just suck at drawing in MSPaint])




    So the weight keeps the lure and line in the desired target depth and you can reel in and let out line to change the lures horizontal postion.

    So is this a new thing that I have thought up? or is it a rig that pretty much everyone knows about and I was the last one to figure it out cause yeah I think that something this simple cant be unknown?

    Am I right when I think that this rig can do good in a stream enviroment where there isnt any combat fishing you could let the lure drift way down stream pulling out your line then slowly retrieve it back?

    I guess the lure on the end can be anything, the shape of a spin and glow is just easier to draw than a spinner or a spoon i guess.
    A bad day fishing is still better than a good day at work.

  2. #2

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    No, variations of this "dropper rig" have been around for quite awhile.

    A lot of people use a 3 way swivel instead of a slider.

  3. #3
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    So as I read your post, it sounds like you're thinking of modifying a "plunking" rig (where the weight is enough to hold in one spot on the river bottom) by using the slider to vary the distance to the spin-n-glo. As you say, on uncrowded rivers and streams (when you find some of those, shoot me a pm! ) you could conceivably let the lure drift quite a ways downstream. It's a good idea.

    My only thought is with the weight stationary, the current of the river against the floating spin-n-glo is going to try and pull (or push?) the spin-n-glo up to the surface. I'm not sure you'd be able to let much line out without the lure rising up out of the strike zone, so in the end I don't think you're going to gain much with the slider over other varitions of a dropper rig. On the other hand, I'd think using the slider would provide a more sensitive rig allowing you to feel a subtle bite better since a fish isn't going to be immediately pulling on the weight as well.

    In the end, there's only one way to know for sure. Try it out this summer. Don't be doubtful. And keep thinking of other methods, tricks, techniques to try out. Remember, someone had to think of all the "standard" rigs for the first time.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  4. #4

    Default good idea

    After you test out your new rig this summer make sure to post on how well it worked for you.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    I think you'll find that with the weight extended on a piece of line that it will tangle with your main line when you cast it.

    I'd hang the weight directly from the snap swivel.

  6. #6
    Member Skookumchuck's Avatar
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    Default

    Some guys I used to know used a very similar rig for spring kings on the columbia down in WA. The only difference is that they used rocks for weights without the dropper line.

    It's kind of genious really. They would find an appropriate sized rock for casting and staying on the bottom. Then they would wrap it with electrical tape and leave a little 'ear flap' in the tape. Then they would attach the weight/rock to the slider by poking the swivel through the 'ear' of the tape. That way when you get snagged up on the bottom the rock pops off and you save your rig....and rocks are a lot cheaper than lead. They would add on line stops (from slip-bobbers) to adjust their leader length when needed.

    If your looking to be able to fish a big long slot without casting a gagillion times, you might be better off with a side-planer. Work great with plugs.
    Nice Marmot.

  7. #7
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default One suggestion:

    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaIsCold View Post
    So I was thinking about some rigs that I could use for fishing streams and rivers since im starting to branch out into baitcasting and spinning. and I came up with this idea (see image [nothing is really to scale i just suck at drawing in MSPaint])




    So the weight keeps the lure and line in the desired target depth and you can reel in and let out line to change the lures horizontal postion.

    So is this a new thing that I have thought up? or is it a rig that pretty much everyone knows about and I was the last one to figure it out cause yeah I think that something this simple cant be unknown?

    Am I right when I think that this rig can do good in a stream enviroment where there isnt any combat fishing you could let the lure drift way down stream pulling out your line then slowly retrieve it back?

    I guess the lure on the end can be anything, the shape of a spin and glow is just easier to draw than a spinner or a spoon i guess.
    Put a hook on your rig.

  8. #8
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    Default check into red led posts

    look at some of my posts on red led its kind what you have drawn up

  9. #9
    Member Cliffhanger's Avatar
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    Default Skookum rig!

    This rig can be used (and is used) even in combat fishing situations. I've seen seen it used at Ship Creek for king salmon when anglers want top get their bait into the current and start soaking it in anticipation of the incoming tide bringing fish with it as the creek rises and the tide floods.

    Yup, a big gob of roe on a treble hook behind that spin-n-glo is a favorite set up for many of the knowledgeable fishermen at Ship who believe they can feel a king strike better with their bait on the slider. It's a direct line, with less resistance from the weight. You do have to watch how far out you let the rig run from the slider or it will rise up off the bottom, away from where you want to be.

    When I've used this set up I cast out, reel the rig up to the slider, feel the weight start to come towards me, then back off on the line 2-3 feet to get that bait away from the slider and situated near the bottom where the fish are.

    So, yup. Your "invention" works!

  10. #10
    Member Raptor_1's Avatar
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    have you thought about using a flat weight? We used to use them back home in Wisconsin. They are just flattened out weights that stay on the bottom much better in current. I think I've seen them sold up here too
    Alaska: We're all here cuz we're not all "there"

  11. #11
    Member AlaskaIsCold's Avatar
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    So im more or less wondering more about the strike zone of king/silver salmon, are they -right- on the bottom or are they more or less within about a foot from the bottom? Because im thinking that if i attached the weight right to the snap swivel it would make it go -very- low to the bottom as opposed to in the water column. Also, are spinners used on their own or can you put roe on them as well?

    More questions than answers I guess!

    --Chris
    A bad day fishing is still better than a good day at work.

  12. #12
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    Thumbs up Stream and River Fishing for Kings/Silvers

    A line with slider works wonders in low to moderate current with a pyramid weight of 1-3 oz. I use hook/roe with an eggloop, but a spin/glow or other similar density lure will work where live bait isn't allowed. Make sure to use a swivel and 1-3 ft/leader, with a bead between the swivel and slider.

    Watch out for grass, roots or other debree. Snags are likely unless youre on a river like the Kustatan that has a pure sand bottom. I can make a field card (laminated wallet size instructions for this getup) and make it available on my website because it is so effective.

    The trick is having the least amount of weight while still sticking to the bottom, or barely moving lure, so you can feel the fish strike. Once the weight sticks, let just a foot or two of slack, and its only a matter of time.

    A silver might nibble a few times. If he does, reel in your slack slowly until the lure taps against the weight and your line goes taught. On the next strike, set the hook and hold on tight. You are fighting the weight of the fish, the current and the extra weight - YEEE HAAA!!!!

    BTW - Placement is crucial in any river. If you want more information, let me know.


    Jerami
    info@alaskafishcamp.com
    Last edited by alaskafishcamp; 02-16-2010 at 11:45. Reason: missed crucial detail, sorry

  13. #13
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaIsCold View Post
    Also, are spinners used on their own or can you put roe on them as well?
    Assuming you mean spin-n-glos, yes you can most definitely use roe with them as well. That's pretty standard.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...hlight=amputee

    As for inline spinners (a vibrax or mepps, for example), typically no roe - although I have seen it done to mixed results.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

  14. #14
    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaIsCold View Post
    So im more or less wondering more about the strike zone of king/silver salmon, are they -right- on the bottom or are they more or less within about a foot from the bottom? Because im thinking that if i attached the weight right to the snap swivel it would make it go -very- low to the bottom as opposed to in the water column.
    Silvers more so than kings seem to move up and down in the water column more often IMO, especially when holding in slack water/pools, but typically when fish are moving upstream they're "right on the bottom" which for all practical purposes is more or less within a foot of the bottom. It depends to some extent on the nature of the stream bottom (rocky, sandy, etc.) but if you're keeping your bait in the bottom foot or two, you're usually going to be in the strike zone. Think of the reds you've seen moving or holding in pools... other salmon (typically) act the same, but are often in deeper/off-colored water where you can't see them.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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