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Thread: Another Hunting Question

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    Default Another Hunting Question

    My husband and I are new to hunting and anyadvice would be great. My husand has a friend that works part time at Bowtech and he hooked him up with a compound bow. He would really like to go hunting with it someday. I am looking to hunt with a rifle. I went to Sportsmens Warehouse yesterday and the employee said that a 7mm would be a good rifle for me to hunt with. (Caribou, moose etc.) He suggested a Savage 7mm with a Bushnell scope. It was a package deal. Does anyone know anythng about this gun or if a 7mm would be a good choice? We will be going hunting with a friend of the family who is an experienced hunter but it is always good to get advice from others.
    Thanks!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    A 7mm is a fine rifle for most Alaskan game. Do you know if it was a 7mm-magnum or a 7mm-08? The magnum is a very fast, flat shooting rifle, but it has a substantial amount of recoil (kick). The -08 is a very mild shooting gun - still accurate, but much more pleasant to shoot for small framed shooters. My wife is 5'0" and small, and she loves shooting her 7mm-08. It is adequate for everything other than large brown bears and bison when it comes to Alaskan game.

    As for the scope, Bushnell is a mid to lower end brand of scopes. They're fine for most circumstances, but I have had one fail on me in the field (fogged up on the inside). If you're willing to spend the money, you'd be better off with something like a Nikon Monarch or a Leupold Vari-x II. Neither will break the bank, but both are quality scopes with lifetime warranties.

    Back to the rifle: I would suggest that you talk to folks at Boondock Sporting Goods in Eagle River or another local shop. Their prices are usually just as good as Sportsman Warehouse, and their knowledge and advice is generally better. That has been my experience, at least.

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    Default rifle

    If I was going to buy a new rifle I would get the remington 700 xcr - in 7mm magnum. I have a rem. 7mm mag that I purchased in 1978 and it still shoots great (sometimes the shooter doesn't but the gun is good)
    I second the trip to Boondocks - they usually have a leupold sale in late April or May and a remington sale in May - you can save about 10% at those sales. They also have some items on sale during the sportsmans show in April.

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    Default 7mm Rem. Mag

    I have to agree, I love my 7 Rem Mag. I have a Ruger M77 Mark II with the Leupold Vari-X II 3-9 on it. I love the gun but it's a bit heavy. I would look at a Remington 700. Brian M is right though, the 7 Rem Mag carries it's fair share of recoil. Before you buy a rifle like that I would try to test one out, see if you can shoot it repeatedly without developing a flinch.

    Really when you are considering a big game rifle for Alaska there's endless possibilities. 7mm-08 is really popular. Also worth consideration would be a 300 Winchester Short Mag (WSM). The 30-06 is a favorite for a lot of people, as well as the .270.

    Before you make your decision, see what calibers your friend has handy, and take them to the range. Best of luck to ya. Let us know what you come up with.

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    Thanks for all the useful information. I will have to go and look at the place in Eagle River.

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    If you haven't shot hi powered rifles much, do yourself a favor and go with the 7mm-08 that Brian recommended, or a .308. Not knocking the other suggestions people made, but they come with more recoil than the 2 choices above, and no need to develop a flinch, you can always upgrade later to a larger rifle if you want, without the flinch! A 7mm-08 or .308 will kill anything but the coastal bears just fine, and your shoulder will thank you.

    Savage makes fine rifles, and Bushnell scopes work well enough! You can also choose a Leupold or Nikon for a little more cash, but a Bushnell would do the job just fine. I have a Bushnell Elite on my .338, never had a problem with it.

    Good luck, whatever you decide.

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    If you are as new to shooting as you are to hunting you need to get a small caliber rifle and learn how to shoot. A bolt action .22 is a fine fun thing to start off with.

    The 7mm-08 is a great round to start off with. I hated my 7mm mag and that Remington 700 is the only gun I have every wanted to sell after shooting it. I think it was the fit of the gun since my .338 mag Ruger is fun to shoot.

    If your hubby is new to bowhunting he is going to need a lot of help in setting things set up and learning how to use the modern equipment. He will need a bow hunting cert to hunt the haul road corridor. You will have to walk five miles in to use your rifle.

    If you have some air line miles saved up look towards Adak for your first caribou. It is a much easier hunt these days than when I was a teenager and it was a military base. Not many bugs unless the wind stops blowing. Not too hot even in July, but you do have to watch out for meat spoilage.

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    I have a .22 and have a good basic concept of shooting. I am however going to start getting more practice in.

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    Personaly, just a thought, I would be looking at the 06 for a starter. not much kick, and will take down most anything in Alaska.

    Once you have that rifle down then try playing with the other's.

    The 7mm has a very fast bullit, and the 444 has a very slow bullit, the 270 has a very fast bullit, the 45-70 has a a slow bullit

    The differance in these are the shock power and the knock down power.

    If you see something 300 yard's away, and can't get any closer, the 444, 45-70, ar'nt going to do you much good, The 270,338, 7'mm, and the 06 will reach out there. Granted the 06 has it's limit's to, but it is one heck of a rifle.

    The 338 will kick your butt. The 270 is like shooting a pea shooter, The 06 is inbetween.

    If it's you first go around, I would be looking at the 06, for two reason's, one the knock down power, the range that it has.

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    Boondocks will have Leupolds on sale at the Great Alaskan Sportsman Show in April.

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    In my view a .30-06, a .308, or even a .270 would be much easier to handle than a 7mm Magnum.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I believe the 308 or 30-06 would do you a better job all around. If you haven't read this thread check it out.

    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=70526

  13. #13

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    If you like the 7mm, go with it. My wife shoots mine quite well and doesn't notice the recoil. Of course she doesn't shoot it off the bench that much either. My friends wife shoots a 300 Ultra mag and has taken moose and caribou with one shot. I like the 7mm mag but that's because it was the one I read about when I was quite young and dreaming about hunting. It'll do it all. You are going to hear everyone else's opinion, do some reading, handle some rifles and pick anyone of the calibers mentioned, but make sure it's the one you want and not what someone else told you is best for you (to a certain extent, don't try to start out with say a 416). Start with light loads in any caliber and work your way up to the heavier stuff. You'll be learning to shoot and deal with recoil at the same time. If you can, get a lead sled rest to shoot off the bench for sighting in. Remember, in hunting situations you will not feel any recoil, and rarely will you hear the rifle report.

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    The 7 mm Savage should be a good rifle, I shot a savage 338 for 8 years as my primary rifle. I had the factory trigger lowered to 3 pounds and with a nikon scope I shoot .75 inch group with factory ammo at 100 yards. Since I purchased a 7 mm, Tikka 3 years ago, my son or I have shot a moose, 3 caribou, a black bear and a mountain goat. That said, even with a limbsaver recoil it has alot more kick then my sons 270. I think savages make some very good barrels, there actions are not as smooth as most. Get familiar with what ever rifle you get and have fun.
    Terry

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    All good advice here and welcome to hunting. Once you experience it you'll never forget about it.

    Lots of folks beat me to the punch here but I'll reiterate it. I don't think the 7mm's are necessarily the way to go. Several folks here recommended the 308 and 30-06. Those are two of the originals and still some of the more popular rounds in North America....and for good reason. I think you would be best off with the 30-06 as it is probably the most versatile rifle around. Not to mention you can get a good quality rifle in 30-06 pretty cheap, ammo anywhere, and the ammo itself is cheap. Recoil is manageable and it will kill all the big game animals up here. While it isn't 'the best' it is still more than good enough.
    Just an example, I bought a Remington Model 700 down in the states for $285 and the thing is a nail driver out to 400 yards.

    Also if you're interested, I could take you out and let you do some shooting with what I have...once the weather warms up a bit. I have a couple smaller guns in .223 and 22-250 as well as a .270win and .300wby. All I would ask is you help out with some ammo. It would give you a chance to shoot various sizes and check out what you might like. Just an offer.

    Anyway, whatever you do, enjoy it. Hunting is more about the hunt when it comes down to it. There are alot of calibers and a ton of rifles that will get the job done.

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    Default Well there you go!

    Quote Originally Posted by patrickL View Post
    All good advice here and welcome to hunting. Once you experience it you'll never forget about it.

    Lots of folks beat me to the punch here but I'll reiterate it. I don't think the 7mm's are necessarily the way to go. Several folks here recommended the 308 and 30-06. Those are two of the originals and still some of the more popular rounds in North America....and for good reason. I think you would be best off with the 30-06 as it is probably the most versatile rifle around. Not to mention you can get a good quality rifle in 30-06 pretty cheap, ammo anywhere, and the ammo itself is cheap. Recoil is manageable and it will kill all the big game animals up here. While it isn't 'the best' it is still more than good enough.
    Just an example, I bought a Remington Model 700 down in the states for $285 and the thing is a nail driver out to 400 yards.

    Also if you're interested, I could take you out and let you do some shooting with what I have...once the weather warms up a bit. I have a couple smaller guns in .223 and 22-250 as well as a .270win and .300wby. All I would ask is you help out with some ammo. It would give you a chance to shoot various sizes and check out what you might like. Just an offer.

    Anyway, whatever you do, enjoy it. Hunting is more about the hunt when it comes down to it. There are alot of calibers and a ton of rifles that will get the job done.

    It doesn't get much better then that. I would also offer to meet with you and your Hubby to shoot both my 30-06 and 7mm Remington Magnum but am not in the area.
    The 7mm has quite a bit more recoil then the 30-06, similar to that of a shotgun. The 7mm is a bit faster bullet but the added edge in power is so small it is not enough to worry about and a Caribou will never know the difference. The bullet trajectory difference is just about 2" at 300 yards.
    I have had Savage Rifles and they are very accurate. Savage has just figured how to keep their manufacturing costs down better then most of the other companies. Hence the lower price. Bushnell is the best scope for the money in that price range and has been making decent reliable scopes for a long time. Just like any piece of optical equipment you need to take care of it.
    The only reason I sold my Savage rifle chambered in 7mm Magnum back in 1990 was to buy a Remington rifle in the same caliber because I wanted a stainless steel rifle and Remiington just came out with one.
    Definately shoot a few different calibers before you make a purchase and Welcome to the website.
    Chris

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    Don't buy anything untill you look at the Ruger compact in either 7-08 or 308. It is a sweet little package that fits smaller people well (wife is 5'3" and loves hers). Boonies usually has em on hand with the laminant stock and stainless barrel. It is a short rifle which makes it easy to hold steady though it does make it a bit louder.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    double what lujon said...i got my wife a gun and it for sure wasn't a 7mm or a savage..she's got a .30-'06 and she loves it, i also have a .270 and .243 but i wont' ever own a 7mm.
    make sure you find a gun that fits your right, thats almost more improtant than the bullet coming out the other end...grab a standard gun like the 7mm, then ask to see a youth model, model seven or something geared down and shoulder it. you'll know then what you want to shoot.
    best of luck!
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
    Master guide 212

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    ...I just wanted to say welcome to the Alaska Outdoor forum!

    -it's always wonderful to see other women getting into shooting and hunting-
    ....a well-regulated militia, being necessary to the security of a free state, the right of the people to keep and bear arms, shall not be infringed....

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    I am really excited to get into hunting. The gun selection seems to be the most difficult so far that I have ran into. I was really excited to see that there are other woman on the board.

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