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Thread: Home made rubber canoe???

  1. #1

    Default Home made rubber canoe???

    Hello:
    Just wondering if anyone has ever tried making a canoe from some of that rubber roofing material? I know it sounds nuts, but I bet it might work in a pinch.
    I think it was on this forum, someone said they had made canoes from Linoleum at some point.
    Gotta love econo-watercraft!

  2. #2
    RMK
    Guest

    Default the bad news is the bucks

    You could probably do it, but unless you have a free source of bituthene, it would be kind of expensive. That rubberized stuff (bituthene moisture barrier) is pricey.

    I would try something cheaper like birch bark. That worked in the old days.

  3. #3
    Member
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    Default Here's an Idea for you

    If you know how to make the frame for your canoe or boat, and you are willing to chance a fabric, try using the shrink wrap material thay use to cover boats with for the winter.
    Not only does it weld to it's self, but it does not tear easily.

  4. #4

    Default

    Oh, man. I am not a participant in this section of the forum and I apologize for the intrusion, but I had to pass on my reaction when I read the title of this thread.

    Seems like a good question for experts corner on The Red Green Show!!!!!

    No reflection on your idea, but ya gotta smile at the thought of what they could do with the question.

  5. #5

    Default

    Now, why didn't I think of that? DUCT TAPE!!!
    maybe a framework made of old coat hangers??? HMMMM!!!
    Thanks Brown Bear!!

  6. #6
    Moderator Alaskacanoe's Avatar
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    Default blue tarp canoe

    I watched a guy build out of willows a canoe frame from willows along the river bank. he wrapped a blue tarp 10x12 footer over the frame and duck tape it fairly tight.
    he did this in about 1 hour and for paddle he mashed out a coffee can and nailed it to an alder..
    set the canoe in the river, put his gear in, climbed in and paddle accross the river, no leaks, no cost, and he was dry ..
    I have seen this same thing done on some old footage of a guy using an oil canvas tarp. like back in the early 30's or so,, he actually put a motorcycle in the canoe and paddled a river,, the story goes that he did this several times as he and anouther guy rode that motorcycle from like Fairbanks thru Canada before the Alcan highway was even a dream, using old trails and such..
    anything is possible..
    max
    When you come to a fork in the trail, take it!

    Rentals for Canoes, Kayaks, Rafts, boats serving the Kenai canoe trail system and the Kenai river for over 15 years. www.alaskacanoetrips.com

  7. #7
    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Default Yup, that was Slim

    Quote Originally Posted by Alaskacanoe View Post
    I watched a guy build out of willows a canoe frame from willows along the river bank. he wrapped a blue tarp 10x12 footer over the frame and duck tape it fairly tight.
    he did this in about 1 hour and for paddle he mashed out a coffee can and nailed it to an alder..
    set the canoe in the river, put his gear in, climbed in and paddle accross the river, no leaks, no cost, and he was dry ..
    I have seen this same thing done on some old footage of a guy using an oil canvas tarp. like back in the early 30's or so,, he actually put a motorcycle in the canoe and paddled a river,, the story goes that he did this several times as he and anouther guy rode that motorcycle from like Fairbanks thru Canada before the Alcan highway was even a dream, using old trails and such..
    anything is possible..
    max
    From Wiki:
    In 1939 Williams made a second trip with John Logan down the proposed Alaska Highway route. This time he traveled during the summer with a 300lb motorbike. He said he never missed a meal, but sometimes he got a few days behind. Logan documented this trip with video footage showing, among other things, how they cooked over the campfire, built boats, and crossed rivers (in one clip, they used a hand-powered tram to haul their motorcycles across). These videos are available at Alaska's Digital Archives

    Slim Williams was a strong proponent of the Alaska Highway before WWII. However, officials decided that there was no need for a highway at that time. When they finally did build the highway in 1942, it went along a route east of the trail Slim had blazed in 1932/33. The decision-makers believed their chosen route would present greater opportunities for economic growth.


    Link:
    http://vilda.alaska.edu/cdm4/item_vi...PTR=7173&REC=2

  8. #8

    Default

    Absolutely amazing, there is just no stopping a good strong will and back!
    Thank you.

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