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Thread: Time to find my lab a mate.his 1st b-day today

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    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Time to find my lab a mate.his 1st b-day today

    Before he gets cut, I need to spread this good blood line around! A jedi in a lab is what i got here! Got his 1st duck with a jump from the boat at 7 months!
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    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

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    It would be irresponsible to breed him before he is old enough to get his health clearances.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by yukon View Post
    It would be irresponsible to breed him before he is old enough to get his health clearances.
    Just curious how old before this can be done? I don't know that I will breed my next dog but plan to leave him intact untill I know if it would be a good idea.

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    Dogs can not get their health clearances (at least their hips) until 2 years of age. I am not 100% sure on eyes and elbows, but I would guess it would be 2 as well. Hopefully a breeder will help me out with the specifics on those.

    I say this because I have a chessie who came from great lines, I spend a lot of money on her and did all the checking one is supposed to do, I decided to not breed her and I had her fixed at about 1 1/2 years. While she was under for getting fixed I had the vet x-ray her hips. Although it was too early I just wanted a preliminary assessment. Well, at the young age she was already showing arthritus in her hips. They were really, really bad. I am glad I had her fixed but even more glad that I caught this genetic defect if I had decided to breed her.
    If I had just breed her because she came from great lines and was a good dog I would have passed on some poor genes.
    She is now 9 1/2, still a great dog and a great hunter, I had one of her hips totally replaces when she was 3 years old and that really helped her.

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    I second what Yukon says about health clearances. At a minimum, eyes and hips should be checked. I am unsure about the two year wait though, an friend of mine just had his dogs eyes and hips certified , and the pup is a little more than a year old.

    As for the dog having papers, here is my analogy. Just because I have a drivers license doenst mean I am ready to drive an 18 wheeler or a nascar. Same with breeding dogs, just becasue they are papered does not mean they are good to go.

    Just my two cents...

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    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    For a final "grade" by OFA on hips and elbows they have to be 2 years old. You can get a prelim done anytime after 6 months but it's suggested to have them done again at two for your final grading. Pennhip is also 6 months, but take it from someone who had both done, Pennhip came back good only to have Failed OFA....I wont breed to anyone under the age of two, or if the results are given before the age of two. You can have a great reading at 6months only to find at two years old your dog shows slight DJD. Two years old is also when a ***** is considered mature in most breeds.
    http://www.offa.org
    http://research.vet.upenn.edu/Defaul...nn.edu/pennhip

    Eyes are every year starting at 6 months old. CERF is only good for one year. http://www.vmdb.org/cerf.html
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    The CERF/eye test can be done on puppies, but has to be done by a board certified veterinary opthalmalogist.

    Potential breeding stock also need to tested for EIC (exercise induced collapse - info at http://www.working-retriever.com/library/taylor.html) and CNM (centronuclear myopathy - website is http://www.labradorcnm.com/pages/site/0-frame_site.html)

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    Yes 2 years old is what is required. I hope that you choose to wait.

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    The eye check (cerf) should be done as a puppy and then yearly if you are going to breed -Believe me I know how important this one is from experience.

    As mentioned hips can't be certified by ofa until 2 years old.

    That leaves CNM, EIC tests - both problem areas in lab breeding.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Just go get him CLIPPPPPPED ... he'll be smarter for never knowing it anyway
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Post I will let the wife wt in..

    Our last dog, a 10 year old purebred black lab, died a year ago from prostate cancer which was very painful and hard for him as well as for us to watch him go through as well as costly, at least $2,200 or more. Now I know price isn't the point here but from what we've heard from several vets during that time and read in all the" lab "books, internet etc this (prostate cancer/problems) is a common occurance for this breed especially for a dog that hasn't been nuetered. The dog was very healthy, not overweight, muscular because he loved to run, etc so his basic health wasn't the cause. Before his going downhill(within a month an a half ) I even had a vet say that he was an excellent looking dog in muscular shape, shiney coat, good weight etc. So now we're trying to take steps to avoid a loss of a pet again with our current lab, give him a great chance. Does anyone else have any a personal story about older labs that haven't been cut and any factual information pertaining to this subject that they'd like to throw in here?
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

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    Member DucksAndDogs's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by atvalaska View Post
    Our last dog, a 10 year old purebred black lab, died a year ago from prostate cancer which was very painful and hard for him as well as for us to watch him go through as well as costly, at least $2,200 or more. Now I know price isn't the point here but from what we've heard from several vets during that time and read in all the" lab "books, internet etc this (prostate cancer/problems) is a common occurance for this breed especially for a dog that hasn't been nuetered. The dog was very healthy, not overweight, muscular because he loved to run, etc so his basic health wasn't the cause. Before his going downhill(within a month an a half ) I even had a vet say that he was an excellent looking dog in muscular shape, shiney coat, good weight etc. So now we're trying to take steps to avoid a loss of a pet again with our current lab, give him a great chance. Does anyone else have any a personal story about older labs that haven't been cut and any factual information pertaining to this subject that they'd like to throw in here?


    Not really sure, but you need to make sure that you get these health clearances done before you breed. One year old is too young to be breeding anyways, you can't really even tell if the dog has enough traits worthy of passing on. I challenge you to look up 10 reputable breeders and see how many have dogs breeding at 1 year old.

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    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    certified...well i guess i jumped the gun ....all the parents are certified and from a long line of "winners".,an I sure got a lot of parperwork that came with this dog, just that the wife was to every vet vist with our last lab and i can't get her off the "get him cut wagon"....
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

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    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    Even if parents have health clearances, the individual dog needs them too & there are likely new ones available. OFA/PennHip clearances, CERF, CNM, EIC and others. A wad of paperwork is just that -- paper. People need to quit breeding just to breed, and only breed to produce better, physically & mentally sounder, more trainable, healthier athletes. Not just more dogs! Not trying to be uppity or rude but far too many dogs, including well bred retrievers, end up in shelters or worse!!

    Listen to your wife & just get him neutered !

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    Member AK Ray's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by 3CBRS View Post
    People need to quit breeding just to breed, and only breed to produce better, physically & mentally sounder, more trainable, healthier athletes.
    And that is why I spade my AKC backyard mutt.
    She is a good pet.
    She will be a decent hunting dog - tons of drive and an awesome nose, smarter than I am about being a retreiver.
    She does not have the "trainable" behavior to make it through HT/HRC/FT situations.
    Maybe in a few years she will calm down and be workable and more in control, but she is not worth breeding so it was an easy choice to make.

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    3CBRS is RIGHT ON with has post. There are so many puppies out there and breeders doing the right thing weeding out EIC and other genetic problems. Home breeders not thoroughly checking the dogs can perpetuate problems. Some complain about paying for a high dollar dog but if you know some of the problems won't show up I think its worth it. Far cry from breeding with the lab down the street.

    atvalaska please don't get me wrong, maybe you are planning EIC, CNM and the other tests. For most home breeders it just a lot of work.

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