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Thread: New Caribou question?

  1. #1
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    Default New Caribou question?

    I am planning a future hunt to the North Slope. I will be hunting for 21 days or longer if that's what it takes. I am just starting to do my research and am finding that Alaska is bigger than I ever imagined. I am not looking for handouts or anyone's hunting area. As far as that goes I prefer being as far from another person as possible when I'm hunting beside a partner.
    I know nothing about the Caribou migration, their movements or the best time to hunt them. I would like to know if they stay in the region or are they resident? Is one area better than another? These are all things I need to learn. I hope to be hunting moose as well. Can do both in the same area at the same time? I'm not sure if it would be best for me to do a float hunt for Moose and Caribou or on foot. I will be dropped by air taxi at the location I settle on.
    I have hunted the Rockies for several years and the Olympic peninsula and have been in some great country. To me the hunt is not about the kill but the magnificent beauty of the country that I get to enjoy while hunting, I am never disappointed no matter the outcome of the hunt!
    Any info is greatly appreciated. Thanks, Frankie.

  2. #2
    Member Jeff Shannon's Avatar
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    You should get a copy of Larry Bartlett's book "Caribou Hunting: A Guide to Alaska's Herds". It'll help you get on track and learn more about caribou behavior and general migration patterns.

    http://www.pristineventures.com/prod...lications.html

    21 days is a long time to hunt and will bring meat care into question. You'll need to consider mid-hunt meat flights, because three weeks is a long time to keep game meat from spoiling. Moose hunting can be done on the slope, but in general the moose densities in northern Alaska are very low. If you have that much time and really want to hunt moose you're probably better off going up north for a 7-10 day caribou hunt in late August, and then moving south of the Brooks and going on a 10 day hunt specifically for moose in early September.

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    Default caribou

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankienick View Post
    ...I know nothing about the Caribou migration, their movements or the best time to hunt them.

    ...I'm not sure if it would be best for me to do a float hunt for Moose and Caribou or on foot. I will be dropped by air taxi at the location I settle on.

    ...I have hunted the Rockies for several years and the Olympic peninsula
    Frankie,

    Caribou hides & the meat exterior is not in the best shape in July due to insects. Latter August caribou can have beautiful hides and antlers in beautiful full on velvet.

    Very late August & September can be the time for the velvet to fall off and the antlers harden so if you're planning a mount you probably want nice full on velvet or for the transformation to hard antler material to be complete.

    Suggestion: You'd probably benefit greatly by working with a hunting guide or a hunt planner. The owner of this web site is a hunt planner.

    Warning: This ain't the Rockies. An experience hunter from elsewhere can easily die here. Be careful.

    Sounds like you have a wonderful hunt planned. Have great fun with it and then get back safe and sound with lots of great stories to tell. Stay tuned to this thread's future posts and use this site's search function to find out more.

  4. #4
    Member Rick P's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Shannon View Post
    You should get a copy of Larry Bartlett's book "Caribou Hunting: A Guide to Alaska's Herds". It'll help you get on track and learn more about caribou behavior and general migration patterns.

    http://www.pristineventures.com/prod...lications.html

    21 days is a long time to hunt and will bring meat care into question. You'll need to consider mid-hunt meat flights, because three weeks is a long time to keep game meat from spoiling. Moose hunting can be done on the slope, but in general the moose densities in northern Alaska are very low. If you have that much time and really want to hunt moose you're probably better off going up north for a 7-10 day caribou hunt in late August, and then moving south of the Brooks and going on a 10 day hunt specifically for moose in early September.
    Yep........and great Caribou question Frankie!
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  5. #5
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Frankie,

    The info provided by Jeff S is really on target.
    A 21 day hunt is a long hunt for anybody. Most hunters and client/hunters start acting a little "different" after 10 or 12 days in the bush. While many of us have done solo hunts for up to two weeks, going solo can be mentally tougher than going as a two or three person hunting team. I mentioned that only because you did not indicate how many partner-hunters you might have.

    And as already mentioned, meat care sooner or later becomes a concern also. A few warm days is one concern. If you have meat bagged up in mid Aug, watch out for the big black flies also. Have really good meat bags and make sue them flies don't lay eggs on the outside of the bags. And then within a three week period, there is always the hungry bear issue.

    I also agree that 21 days, three weeks, might best be broken up into two seperate hunts. Frankly, statewide, I'm not aware of any one place that has remained good/great for both caribou and moose.

    ...random other notes...
    ....river/streams generally drop dramatically in late Aug...
    ....North Slope caribou generally lose their velvet in the first week of Sept. Some, perhaps many, will be hard horned the last few days in Aug. On all the late Aug 'bou kills, the velvet will easily strip off. It almost falls off.
    ....snow can be a concern as early as mid Aug, and will be an issue by mid Sept.

    But, I really do complement you on planned plenty of time for your quest.
    Hope this helps some...

    Hopeo my mis-speling's did noto detracto or distracto from you'r interpretation of the contento to-two-too-2mucho.

    Dennis

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    Frankie you are getting there. Just need to refine it some.

    Something like this maybe.

    My name is Frankie,

    I will be flying into Fairbanks and plan on driving up the Haul road to hunt caribou. I have 21 days to try to successfully harvest a caribou. What would be the best time of year to hunt along the Dalton corridor. How do you keep meat from spoiling while in the field. Can I hunt moose also or just caribou???

    You have come to the right place for answers, you just have to ask the right questions. Download the regs and read them.

    Books have been written on this subject. I would recommend that you buy and read a few books. The bookstore on this site has several good reference books.

    You said you are hunting the North Slope. Big area, are you planning on the haul road or out of Kotz. Each area is a little different and the time line will be different for each.

    The Caribou summer on the North Side of the Brooks and start to migrate towards Kotz in the fall. The timing is different each year. Late July to the first week of September is usually good for Caribou along the haul road.

    From the Yukon river bridge north is the Dalton Corridor, bow hunting only within 5 miles of the road. To bow hunt you must be a certified bow hunter.

    The five mile hike from the road on the tundra is not for the faint of heart.

    You are on the right track, keep asking questions and doing research. Just ask a little more
    detailed questions.

    Moose Hunting in this area is mostly Draw only.

    Be careful, hunting here can be addictive.

    Steve
    Last edited by stid2677; 02-07-2010 at 20:48. Reason: superbowl Sunday, drinking while typing

  7. #7
    Member BlueMoose's Avatar
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    Default Future Note

    Go to the ADF&G web Site and look at Draw tags for the Alaska Range if you are lucky enough to Draw an Alaskan Range Tag you could find your-self in a reasonable position to double harvest with some planning looking forward to the out years if in fact you continue to come up and enjoy Alaska.

    I would also contact Coyote Air and Brooks Range Aviation about slope hunting drop offs and timing. They spend a lot of time flying up there and are always willing to talk abuot areas maybe not specifics but enuogh to help you determine timing and cost for the most part.

    As Jeff mention Larry does have a book out about Caribou I would also look at Michael Strahan's Book as well as contact them about your plans. Yes they accomplish Trip Planning for a fee but the also help people now and again with general information. Mike is the owner of this Forum and is easy enough to find.

    Best Wishes and I hope you have that Trip of a life time.

    Richard Mousseau
    BRM

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    Hey guys, I just wanted to thank you for the information you provided. I will be purchasing some books ( a lot of them) and doing a ton of research. I am fully aware of the dangers afield and would not attempt a hunt unguided in Alaska unless I was fully prepaired and educated on the area and the animals. I have a very strong will and when I set out to do something I am prepared for the worst.
    Thanks again, Frankie.

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    Thumbs up Perfect!

    Quote Originally Posted by Frankienick View Post
    Hey guys, I just wanted to thank you for the information you provided. I will be purchasing some books ( a lot of them) and doing a ton of research. I am fully aware of the dangers afield and would not attempt a hunt unguided in Alaska unless I was fully prepaired and educated on the area and the animals. I have a very strong will and when I set out to do something I am prepared for the worst.
    Thanks again, Frankie.
    You'll do very well with that outlook, and you'll have great experience here too. Keep leaning on this forum for info as your hunt approaches; you'll continue to find it a wealth of information I would think.

    You're definitely on the right track.

  10. #10
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Default My recommendation

    for your first book to read about hunting in Alaska is: http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/sto...products_id=25 available on this web site. Good luck.

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