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Thread: moose proofing

  1. #1
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    Default moose proofing

    Greetings,
    I am in charge of getting our school's garden up and running. I am in the process of designing a fence that will allow good moose proofing yet allow good visibility and yet is not chain link. I am thinking a wooden fence with slats spaced about 12 inches apart would work. any other ideas?
    I am also putting together our fund raiser in April. So far I have a seed swap, silent auction, vendors and demos planned. What other activities would attract more gardeners?
    Thanks,
    Kat
    rsmsgarden.pbworks.com

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    Moose have very sensitive ears; I would use a truck horn and have the moose turn it on for you.

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    10' steel fence rods made to hold wire placed 3' deep, with 7' above ground, electric fence 'hangers,' etc., vertical fence rods spaced at 5-6' apart, with a more than adequate electrified fence transformer (I like to go over-kill on that item, btw), a 'hot' wire run on plastic insulated hangers at 2-1/2' high, 5' high, and 7' high, and at the top, far enough away not to make accidental contact, but close enough that when the critter sticks her nose over, she contacts both the hot and a ground, run a solid ground on a vertical 2" hanger; when she makes contact with both the hot and the grnd, she KNOWS you are possessive about your broccoli, as there's no uncertainty in THAT message at that time. ;^>)

    After sparring with the buggers for years, I went into the local feed store and told the clerk that I wanted a transformer hot enough that when she touched it, you can smell moose burgers cooking a quarter-mile away; I ended up with a 15-mile rated transformer for a total of 570 ft of wire when adding all the different heighths of wire together.

    I asked the fellow if I had to worry about my kids touching the thing. He told me "they'd only do it once," which required some clarification. ;^>)

    If desired, you can tie some flame pink or orange flagging/safety ribbon to the top wire, with short strips placed every couple of feet or so for fair notice, but moose are reportedly color blind... So, take that last bit at your own dsicretion...

    Ideally no aircraft are flying that low, so I'm not sure who's being warned by the colorful ribbon strips, but it seemed like a thoughtful idea at the time.

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    Default other ideas

    We used cow and pig fencing from Alaska Feed. They are 16' stiff wire panels. The wire makes about 8" x10" squares. I think the cow fencing is 6 tall and the pig fencing is 4' tall. Overlapped and wired together, they make a nice tall (~9') fence. We secured it to metal t-stakes and have been happy with it.

    Our neighbor made a really simple yet gorgeous moose fence. It is simply a rail fence. Two rails, one about waist level and one head level or higher. It looks great because the uprights and the rails are spare logs from their building business. Their idea is that the top rail is too high for them to climb/jump and the bottom one is too short to go under. It doesn't keep small critters out, but evidentally it works well on the moose. They have a pretty impressive garden and the moose don't seem to have bothered them. I think it has been up for three years.

    To put together the pig and cow fencing, we just overlapped a pig fence with a cow fence one or two squares and wired them together. We bought a roll of pre-cut wires looped on each end (I forget what they call them) and that made putting the sections together really easy. Just fold that pre-cut/looped wire around the overlapping fence wires we wanted secured, and used a allen wrench chucked into a drill to hook through the loops on the wires and let the drill tighten them together. Worked great and fast. This fencing also worked great when we needed to make a curve, since it is stiff yet flexible.

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    Wink Moose fence

    Moose can jump a 6 foot fence with eaze. Electric fence with the wires about 8" apart hold then out. Run the wire 12" off the ground, and every 8" apart unitl your up about 5' to 6'. Looking to zap them on the nose and ears and they will back off. Anything else they jump or push over, IMO
    Don

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    Quote Originally Posted by Duckdon View Post
    Moose can jump a 6 foot fence with eaze. Electric fence with the wires about 8" apart hold then out. Run the wire 12" off the ground, and every 8" apart unitl your up about 5' to 6'. Looking to zap them on the nose and ears and they will back off. Anything else they jump or push over, IMO
    Don
    Hmm Have you heard of moose jumping a 6 ft fence to get in a garden? The garden I have has a 4 ft fence and the moose won't even try to step over it. If they can't reach it from the edge they don't bother it.

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    Big Dog 60, sounds like you been real lucky. Not looking for an argument on the gymnastic ability's of a moose but the cow I had last summer was pushing down an 8 foot fence to get in my garden when I hit her with a chair. Thats when the hot wire went up. A buddy of mine in Anchorage had a 6 foot ceder fence and every year his garden was raided by jumping moose or maybe they learned to work the gate. Not sure about that but the hot wire works for me and its cheap. Don

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    Member big_dog60's Avatar
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    That may be.
    I must admit though i have never seen a unmolested moose jump.

    For many years we surounded our gardens with pedestrian fencing and the moose never even tried to push agenst it. For some reason they wouldn't even step over the low spots. There were plenty of moose around they just never even tried to get through the fences.

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    Well, as far as the moose jumping fence.....they do! My neighbor has a 6 foot fence around his garden and I sometimes wonder why. The moose jump it! Not only do the mommas jump it, but the babies have been in it also. My neighbor has actually watched them jump back out of it. He said it was something to see.

    I do not have a fence around mine, because I figure if they want my stuff, they are going to get it anyways.

    So..yes, they can jump a tall fence.

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    Friends in another area of the State have used old worn-out gill nets (8'-10' in depth, or heighth, once strung on posts). I've personally watched a calm and intent-on-lunch family of moosels jump over their gill-net fencing as easily as I'd step over a small puddle.

    Electrified fencing is the ticket, whether supported on 10' metal fence rods driven 3' into the ground, or on a more elaborate, decorative or structurally-stout fence.

    Also, moose are critters of habit. They may hit all the gardens around yours, and not touch yours for years. Then, once they've made their first profitable visit to your veggie patch, they'll be back, almost like clock-work, typically coming about the same time each year, too.

    At our current location, they missed my veggies for close to 5 years (+/-). I spent that 5 years or so laughing quietly to myself about the horror stories my neighbors would tell about their veggies, while my world-class broccoli went unmolested. Then the local moose hooligans were on to our crops, and visiting three times a year, minimum, becoming more brazen over time.

    It's sorta' like a rotational/seasonal eating circuit for them. Seriously. They used to visit us early on, then right about when the broccoli was ripening (an apparent favorite among rumenants and humans alike), and then right after we'd harvested most of our stuff, they'd come and make short work of the otherwise tedious root and stalk removal phase, frequently catching the beets and carrots we'd left in the ground for later harvest after the frost.

    Three words; electrify, electrify, & electrify. Moose hate it.

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    Gardener,

    How about some wood reinforced by some type of wire mesh?

    http://www.bwire.com/measure_wire_cloth.htm

    I was thinking like a 2x2 wire cloth? Not 100% sure if this will work because I cannot clearly understand what you originally thinking with your model, but just throwing an idea at you. Good luck with the fence.

  12. #12

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    I built a fence for my wife's garden. We haven't had a moose jump our fence yet. It has been two years since I built it. We used to have problems with moose. Now we don't except for on occasion when we leave an opening on accident. I suppose a moose could jump over it, but I doubt they would. They would feel too vulnerable in my opinion. But, I suppose it's possible. Lean over it maybe, but I doubt they would jump over it.

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    Default forget the hardware, and go au-natural

    Go buy bulk ground black pepper (like 5#), and sprinkle it liberally in a contiguous line around your garden. Your garden plants won't mind one bit, but it will keep all wildlife that grazes and/or has a nose to the ground OUT.

    Or, go put the hardware store's boy through college by following the advice given here so far....

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    For protection? Bird net, sometimes called deer net. Buy it in the garden section at Lowe's or Home Depot. Cheap, transparent, and it works great on trees. For a deterrent? Wolf urine. Buy it at Mill Feed. They have little bottles to deploy it, too. No moose will come near it.

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    If you have some old DVDs around you don't want anymore, drill a small hole on the edge of them, then attach sting and hang them to tree branches or posts around your garden. The moose spook away when the DVDs swing around in the breeze. Works for deer too.
    If its tourist season.....Can we shoot em??
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    I had moose eating 12 the garden for years. I had a 7' fence & they still got in.
    I found that they don't like to jump over raspberries. So over the past few years.
    I've planted raspberries around the whole garden. Was able to take down my barbed wire (my wife called it prison wire)
    Now no moose & lots of berries.
    Not bushed out yet in the pic but goes all the way around

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    Moose may not care to "jump" raspberries, but they sure don't mind stomping through my Raspberrie bushes to get the last leaves hanging..... Very attractive garden there..../John

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    Perhaps it's the quality of soil, the type of organic fertilizers, or the specific hybrid of raspberry, but we have pics of a cow and her two calves eating (or, rather, pruning) my wife's prize raspberry hedges/bushes/trees... I've tried to explain to them that the thorns aren't good for their rumens, but they seem to insist. ;^>)

    Two or so generations ago, the particular cow in question's grandmother moose stomped my Quinalt strawberries into the ground as thoroughly as any hooligan bent on revenge ever might've thought to do, seemingly as a matter of outcome in what might be described as an on-going, overly-personalized, inter-species battle gone awry.

    Thus far, the only thing they don't eat that they're not supposed to eat is my potato garden, though I think I've witnessed a Darwin-award-recipient of a calf moose out back, looking star-struck while gazing upon that patch, as well.

    Once again; electrify.. And it's cheaper than you might think. Besides, when one of the neighbors' kids pees on your fence just to test old fables, you may get a front-row seat to one of the more comical aspects of young personhood.. That whole curiosity meets cat thing..,

    If you ask me (and I thinik you did, sorta'), "Good (electrified) fences make good neighbors." Even where the moosels are concerned..

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    Mudbuddy...do you have bottoms on those raised beds?
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    I've been thinking about stringing an electric wire around my garden, but I'm not yet sure that it's the right option. First of all, I've got a 2 year old and an 8 month old that will be running around the yard. I understand it won't kill them, but I'm not thrilled about shocking my little guys until I know for sure that they can understand my warnings. Yes, I supervise them, but accidents happen. I could probably make that work, but the other issue is that my garden is relatively low to the ground and has limited size and access (from the front only), so unless I made the electric fence quite high the moose could likely just feed right over the top of it. I don't want to limit my own access to the garden, nor is my wife thrilled about changing the asthetic of the garden. Obviously keeping our food for us is the more important consideration, but she really enjoyed the appearance of the garden last summer and doesn't want to obscure it behind a lot of wire or other fencing material. We didn't have any problems with moose last year (though the hares discovered it late in the summer), but I'm sure it's only a matter of time.

    Any ideas other than those shared above?




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