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Thread: Differences in Smoked Salmon

  1. #1
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    Default Differences in Smoked Salmon

    Hello,

    I would like to learn to smoke salmon so that it tastes like the thinly sliced smoked salmon I have previously tasted... not the smoked salmon that comes in thick strips.

    (The thinly sliced salmon appears to be cooked ENTIRELY different than those thick strips....)

    First, let me explain the two types of smoked salmon with which I am familiar. Both are packaged. One comes in a strip about 2 inches wide and about 4 inches to 6 inches long. Obviously cut straight from the fish. Not cut on a bias.

    The other type of smoked salmon with which I am familiar comes also in a package. But this package is huge and the fish is flat. The salmon is sliced on a bias. As if one took a knife and sliced as thinly as possible and at an angle. Wild Oats, Whole Foods, Trader Joes, you name the place and they have their own version.

    Just so we know EXACTLY ... (not promoting this site, just using it as a reference)

    I like the taste of the first 6 packages on http://www.spenceltd.com/products/index.shtml

    but I don't like salmon that looks like the one pictured in image 11. (I realize it is labeled BAKED salmon.. but smoked salmon comes in those strips too.. that's what I don't like... they taste different.

    I dont' care who makes it... that kind of salmon (baked or smoked) tastes DIFFERENT!

    I don't think I want a pellicle formed... I think that is what I am tasting when I taste those big strips. (but I know the smoke must attach to something.0

    Even when I take a big strip and try to slice those big ugly strips into thin slices, it tastes entirely different.

    Came someone explain the difference in the recipes or smoking method?

    Desire a homemade smoked salmon that tastes like what you get in those packages of flat smoked salmon.... This other stuff comes out rubbery or something.

  2. #2
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    It sounds like you prefer fish that was smoked in whole fillets and then sliced, as opposed to cut into strips, brined, and smoked in individual pieces. Smoking whole fillets is much more difficult, which explains why most home smokers don't do it. If I could do whole fillets as pretty and consistent as Alaska Sausage I'd do so. I haven't figured it out yet.

  3. #3
    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default Experimental

    Smoking is an experimental process to meet individual tastes and preferences. The brine can have a variety of ingredents that can change the taste considerably. The soaking time is usually 24 hours for me. As far as the actual smoking process I use a Binkman smoker with charcoal. You usually have to add some more fuel along the way as well as flavoring chips. I think it is too easy to over smoke the fish.

    Some fillets are just too thick. Better to cut them into strips. Whole fillets can be done but smaller fish are preferred, reds esp. Bellies are a delight that are not shared with others unless a lot of whining is produced first.

    Like I said, it is an exerimental process.
    Last edited by Daveinthebush; 01-01-2007 at 09:13. Reason: sp
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  4. #4
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    Sounds like you like cold smoked salmon or Lox. Find a recipie for either and give it a try.
    Tennessee

  5. #5
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    If anybody has some good advice for cold smoking whole fillets I'd love to hear about it. A Canadian friend is pretty good at it but it still falls short of the quality and consistency that commercial smokers achieve.

    Do commercial smokers have humidity control?

  6. #6
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    I'll second what it sounds like he is looking for is Lox.

    There is a book that has Lox and how to do it you can find locally or order if ya like. "smoking salmon and trout" by Jack Whelan.

    Chapter 11, making lox.

    Has instructions, cures, temps, and times.

    Also found this on a quick google search. http://seafood.ucdavis.edu/pubs/smoking.htm

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