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Thread: Too young..

  1. #1
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    Default Too young..

    My dad called me the other day.....Anyways I was telling him about Going to Fairbanks to the BOG meeting this month, He went on to tell me that I am to young do be dealing with stuff like this, and they wont take anything I say seriousley [I'm 20}........so basically I'm asking if you guys think age comes into play at all when it comes to them listening to you....Though I have been in Alaska for 20 years....I know that isin't nearly as long as most people that will be there I'm sure.

  2. #2
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    GO FOR IT. It will be a learning experience for you, and yes, they do listen. Unless of course they are deaf, in which case, hopefully they can read lips.

    Bottom line is, nothinh happens when no one does anything. So DO SOMETHING.

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    First you are never too young to get involved. Second, make sure you do more listentening than talking. last, Do your own research on topics and don't be afraid to ask questions of people "in the know".

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    Thumbs up go for it

    I agree with LuJon, get involved, listen more than talk, do your home work, and when you do speak, do so articulately and concisely, and,... think how much credability (and education) you will have 20 years from now when you can say how much experience you have.

  5. #5

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    If you know what your talking about, and not parroting someone else's agenda, they will hear you. It can be very intimidating to speak at public meetings, so the younger you start, the sooner you will be able to speak with a steady, confident voice. Go for it.

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    Default I'd say that if decisions that are being made

    are going to effect you, and you understand the weight of them, you ought to be there, if only to represent those your age. Take notes do research communicate with your friends. but be patient. learn the charictor of those in charge by how they answer and deal with issues .
    If and when you have something to say, make sure you have all your ducks in a row. Be ready to introduce your self If they ask.
    I remember when I was your age, learning to deal with many diffrent types of meetings.
    best of luck.

  7. #7
    Member HWK's Avatar
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    I have two kids in high school and they attend the BOG meetings. Any one can write a proposal. And any one can speak you just cant vote until you are 18, When a teenager speeks with thought and clarity people listen because they dont expect it. So do your home work and let them hear it.. JMO

  8. #8
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    Muzzy,

    I think it's great you want to get involved in the process. I strongly encourage it, in fact. I suppose age could come into play, but we all have to start somewhere. If you speak clearly and are versed on what you want to hit on, your age could even be an asset to you.

    I am planning to attend the meeting, and if you have any questions feel free to pm me. Maybe we could get together at some point too in town. Others here are also versed with the process if you have any questions.

    I'm a dad to kids your age, and I think I hear some of what your dad is saying. Hard to see your kids jump into the fire, so to speak...we don't want them to get disillusioned early on and think they don't have a legitimate say in things. Again, I strongly encourage you to go though if that is what you want to do. I think most people will respect someone your age just for participating in the process, regardless of whether or not they agree or disagree with your views.

  9. #9
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Actually, I think some people will listen to younger speakers more, as they're not expecting someone young to be involved, thus their ears perk up at what is heard.

    I testified last year for the first time at the age of 30, and I was still one of the youngest ones there. Get involved now, especially if you've taken the time to prepare and educate yourself.

  10. #10
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Absolutely....

    muzzyhunter17,

    They will absolutely positively listen to you....as much or more....than they will to us silver haired experts....if your act is together and your position is backed up with credible information.

    I would be truly surprised if they did not all perk up while listening to you and getting a "snapshot of the future".

    And now that you have mentioned this to the forum, please keep us informed of how you interpret the experience.

    Dennis

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    Member MARV1's Avatar
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    Go for it, you are never too young to get involved. I've been getting involved the past 2.5 years, should have started sooner.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

  12. #12
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    come one down muzzy.. i will introduce you to some good folks... all will appreciate your attendance and willing ness to participate...

    I am 42 this year and was told at one of the first AC meetings i went to... that i was too young to remember hunting up north like all the old guys on the ac did.... so...


    whence my turn came to speak ..... i was able to explain to them my feelings of the situation and turned to the previous talker... and informed him i was not so young that i don remember (working) Driving up and down that road LONG before it was open for him to hunt off

    some times a gentle reminder is all it takes..

    though on the opposite side dad has some sorta point too...NOt saying you are or would be... just know how i was at 20 trying to make my mark.......... leave the cocky at home or they Will NOT take you serious.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  13. #13
    Member Blade Dude's Avatar
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    Muzzyhunter
    From my personal experience the BOG will pay just as much, or more attention to a younger person that testifies at their meetings. All you have to do is, a. be respectful, and b. do your homework about the proposal you are going to talk about. The first time I testified at a BOG meeting I had just turned 14. The board listened to my proposal just as carefully and took it just as seriously as any other proposal. They even went as far as to say that they liked to see younger people get involved.
    Good luck
    BD

  14. #14

    Thumbs up

    The fact of the matter is: Your Dad was correct. You are much too young to have significant influence or stake in the decisions. It takes at least that many years of networking, before you are in the loop. Lots of folks new to the process come up with statistics, equations, emotions and personal agendas. After a couple of years of giving testimony and getting the slam dunk, they get frustrated and stop going.

    Now I am going to give you some advice, like your Dad tried. Take it or leave it, but it will be proven to be rewarding, if you follow it.

    Use your formidable years to develop friendships and kinships with the players involved. Get to know them on a first name basis and their families. Know their likes and dislikes, their favorite drinks and food and what captures their attention (Hint: It is NEVER Statistics and Studies). More often than not, you will find that what turns your crank is also what turns their crank. People are people, don't try to over think the process. Don't try to impress them with your experience or knowledge. These folks believe it or not, are just as smart as the rest of us. Once you decide it is time to test the waters, jump in. If after the first time, you experience a degree of frustration, you should accept the fact you went about it wrong. Don't repeat what you know didn't work. If you don't know the members/players/decision makers (not necessarily always the one's sitting at the table, taking the testimony ) then you are not prepared for success. Take it or leave it, your call.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

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    GO!
    And continue to go again. When you get there, LISTEN. I have a son your age and would be thrilled if he took an interest as you are doing.
    I work in the construction industry and attend meetings almost on a daily basis with everyone from Engineers, Bankers to Union Journeymen and Bricklayers.
    Do listen and don't speak out of turn or make comments after anothers comments.
    Don't carry on or get into side conversations with others while the meeting is going on. It is distracting and rude. Turn your cell phone off.
    Don't be the first to put your hand up when a topic is opened up for discussion. The easiest way to keep from asking dumb questions is to let someone else ask it first.
    If your question has not been brought up before the discussion closes and the adgenda begins to move to the next topic then that is the time to ask your question. Don't ask multiple questions at a time or be long winded.
    Don't be the guy who wants all the attention by dominating the meeting and having something to say everytime a topic opens up for comments.
    You may have time after the meeting to meet informally for chit-chat with panel members if for nothing more then to say hello and saying thanks for the opportuity to speak. Take advantage of it to make friends. Leave your ego at the door.

    But go go go. We old farts typically will go out of our way to mentor someone like you if we see potential. Your never too old to say Yes Sir and be polite, but not meek.

  16. #16
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blade Dude View Post
    Muzzyhunter
    From my personal experience the BOG will pay just as much, or more attention to a younger person that testifies at their meetings. All you have to do is, a. be respectful, and b. do your homework about the proposal you are going to talk about. The first time I testified at a BOG meeting I had just turned 14. The board listened to my proposal just as carefully and took it just as seriously as any other proposal. They even went as far as to say that they liked to see younger people get involved.
    Good luck
    BD
    Quote Originally Posted by PRDATR View Post
    GO!
    And continue to go again. When you get there, LISTEN. I have a son your age and would be thrilled if he took an interest as you are doing.
    I work in the construction industry and attend meetings almost on a daily basis with everyone from Engineers, Bankers to Union Journeymen and Bricklayers.
    Do listen and don't speak out of turn or make comments after anothers comments.
    Don't carry on or get into side conversations with others while the meeting is going on. It is distracting and rude. Turn your cell phone off.
    Don't be the first to put your hand up when a topic is opened up for discussion. The easiest way to keep from asking dumb questions is to let someone else ask it first.
    If your question has not been brought up before the discussion closes and the adgenda begins to move to the next topic then that is the time to ask your question. Don't ask multiple questions at a time or be long winded.
    Don't be the guy who wants all the attention by dominating the meeting and having something to say everytime a topic opens up for comments.
    You may have time after the meeting to meet informally for chit-chat with panel members if for nothing more then to say hello and saying thanks for the opportuity to speak. Take advantage of it to make friends. Leave your ego at the door.

    But go go go. We old farts typically will go out of our way to mentor someone like you if we see potential. Your never too old to say Yes Sir and be polite, but not meek.
    Muzzy Both these comments eloquently say what i was attempting to... even AKRES has a few points to listen to....

    In all honesty your youthfulness will be appreciated and thanked for not only having the interest but in actually taking your time to attend. like i said come on down. you'll be made felt welcome..

    Vince
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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