Results 1 to 12 of 12

Thread: "Fishing Guide to Prince William Sound" book

  1. #1
    Member Maast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    510

    Default "Fishing Guide to Prince William Sound" book

    Does such a book even exist? I've looked and havent found any. I've got the new edition "Cruising PWS" book and its great with LOTS of info in there.

    However I've never seen a book that'll tell me where to motor to and when I should do it for various types of fishing, I'd love to find a book thats tells me to "go to X spot at Y time of the year, there'll be probably be halibut at Z depth"

    I've pretty much got silvers dialed in and have caught a lot of them, but I've only caught a few kings and halibut in PWS, and for that matter the places I've caught halibut previously were empty last year.

    Now that I've got the range and safety factor to roam PWS I'd like to get a clue where the productive areas are - which I can do to a certian extent in examining charts and making educated guesses but I've only been doing salt water fishing in AK for a few years and I havent acquired yet the depth of knowledge needed to make GOOD educated guesses.

    Basically I'm getting a little tired of my usual trial-and-error. My fishing buddy and I know HOW to fish for everything, we just dont know WHERE.

    I'd happily drop a hundred bucks or more for a book like I'm describing.


    Thanks

    Dave
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

  2. #2
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    That's because it's " Secret bay, Hidden Mountain/Island"..........

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  3. #3
    Member Maast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    510

    Default

    yeah, I know I'm asking for close-hold info, but I figured the question was worth asking.....

    BTW, great sig line
    2696 Sea Raider Pilothouse
    "Dominion"

  4. #4
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    I'll preface this by saying I just started fishing PWS this past summer and only went out twice so I certainly don't feel like I know how to fish that place at all.

    Having said that, I think there are some of us that don't want such a book to ever come out. I know at some point it probably will but when it does, most of the good places will end up getting hammered. I prefer to find places on my own or meet up with fisherman and swap spots or information. Call me crazy but PWS seems like a pretty tough place to learn the fishing and I would hate to have it overrun because now that a books out people know exactly where to go.

    That all being said, if there was a good book I'd sure be buying it.

  5. #5
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    As I'm fond of saying, I'm a better resource of where not to fish than where to fish Such a book would be great, but then the fishing would likely drop off.

    I've give you some recomendations from my limited experience in the sound. I'll add the caveat that I'm a catcherman more than a fisherman, so anchoring up and soaking bait for hours holds 0 interest for me. If I haven't hooked fish within 1/2 hour of arriving at a spot, I'll move on.

    I haven't found the type of fishing I'm interested in until I get to Knight Island, or further on towards Montague. Check your charts and look for areas of high relief, with the shallowest parts preferably at 100', but if the pinnacle or plateu occurs at 200' and drops off to 600' or more, odds are you'll be able to find some fish. I generally drift over the pinnacles and shelfs and jig until I get to where I can't hold bottom, or the amount of line reamaining on the reel makes me think its going to take some time to reel up so I might as well do that and set up for another drift.

    A couple years back I went out with a couple of co-workers and we hit spots people told us they'd caught halibut. We hit 4 spots and covered alot of miles with no fish, even a spot I'd caught some fish the year before. So I decided to hit an area that looked promising on the charts. Not only did it have the steep relief shown on the charts, but I found there were some pinnacles including one that went up to only 50' deep that didn't show on the chart. As the wind changed direction we drifted different directions. In the roughly hour we fished the spot I pulled up 2 ling cod, and I think we limited out on rock fish.

    I fished the same area and nearby drop offs that fall with some friends that came up deer hunting, and he and his wife also each got a nice ling cod, and plenty of rock fish.

    I still haven't found the right spot for halibut, but plan to put in a solid effort this summer.

    If the silvers are running, drift around the points and toss buzz bombs or mooch. I once caught a nice silver at ~60' when I was dropping a jig for rockfish, never hit bottom.

  6. #6

    Talking I can tell go exactly where to go

    and when, but somebody's gonna have to die! Sorry, it had to be said LOL.

    Honestly though, I think the fish in the sound, that being salmon, are a fluid dynamic. To say they will be here at this point at this time is improbable. As far as lings and buts go, anywhere on the south side is a good guess. Flatter for flat fish, bumpy and pinacles for lings and things. Beyond this non-precise advice, it's a guessing game. Of course, this is just my opinion, which doesn't mean crap to my wife. Ha.
    We never really grow up, we only learn
    how to act in public

  7. #7

    Default

    That's why they call it Fishing!

    If you want to go catching, then your best bet is always Pony Cove out of Seward.

    I believe that before you find the hot spots, you have to pay your dues. Whether that be by trying new areas yourself, hanging around and talking with other fishermen, etc. If you had a book with all the hot spots by lat/long and when to fish there, then anybody with no initiative whatsoever could just buy the book, motor out and start pulling fish out of the water. I think it's something that needs to be earned. And the harder it is to obtain, the more you will appreciate it when you have it.

  8. #8

    Default

    So, let me get this straight, it is pretty simple; just don't follow Paul around and you'll catch lots of fish....... But, as he aptly noted, consistent butt holes (couldn't resist) in the sound are just hard to find...unless you are at the boat launch on a Saturday morning in Whittier on a nice day. In that case, they are everywhere.......

  9. #9
    Member patrickL's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, AK
    Posts
    1,131

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    So, let me get this straight, it is pretty simple; just don't follow Paul around and you'll catch lots of fish....... But, as he aptly noted, consistent butt holes (couldn't resist) in the sound are just hard to find...unless you are at the boat launch on a Saturday morning in Whittier on a nice day. In that case, they are everywhere.......
    Sometimes you guys kill me.

  10. #10
    Member flyfishak30's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    131

    Default I have the book you are looking for!!!!!!

    You send me your 100 bucks and i will send you your book.
    You can trust me

    I have books for all rivers and lakes as well.

  11. #11
    Member AKBassking's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    SE Alaska-Summer Columbia River-Winter
    Posts
    2,007

    Default

    I would have to agree with Paul. Fishing for Butts in PWS is tough. It is not like Cook Inlet where all you need is a bare hook. You have to work the shelves and the points.

    If you do a little research you find that Coghill Lake, Main bay are your reds. For silvers try trolling the points or jigging.

    BE MINDFUL OF THE COMMERCIAL GUYS AND GIVE THEM PLENTY OF ROOM! DON'T RUN OVER THEIR NETS! REMEMBER they are working, while you are playing.

    It will take you a few years to find "your spots" but lock them down in your GPS.

    Also make sure you have enough fuel and saftey equipment on board. Calling USCG for help because you ran out of fuel is unexcusable. You don't want that reputation. Know your limits of you and your boat.

    You may find times when you will have to hold up in a bay until weather clears.

    ALASKAN SEA-DUCTION
    1988 M/Y Camargue YachtFisher
    MMSI# 338131469
    Blog: http://alaskanseaduction.blogspot.com/

  12. #12
    Member Alaska Gray's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    4,925

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by T.R. Bauer View Post
    So, let me get this straight, it is pretty simple; just don't follow Paul around and you'll catch lots of fish....... But, as he aptly noted, consistent butt holes (couldn't resist) in the sound are just hard to find...unless you are at the boat launch on a Saturday morning in Whittier on a nice day. In that case, they are everywhere.......
    I have ran out to Paul. I can be bought $$$$$$ to say where Paul goes

    Fishing spots in Whitter is on that just about all will keep secret. Fishing for halibut is spotty but if you can find a spot it will pay off.
    Living the Alaskan Dream
    Gary Keller
    Anchorage, AK

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •