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Thread: Boot recommendations for September Caribou in Kotz

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    Default Boot recommendations for September Caribou in Kotz

    HI All,

    Im putting together a list of items I may not have and wanted to get your recommendations for Boots and or any other gear items you think are essential for a September Caribou Hunt out of Kotz. Thanks.

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    Member AkGreg's Avatar
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    Default depends on the location

    you will need at a minimum good ankle boots that are waterproof at least to your knee. depending on your area you could be in really wet tundra and have lots of mini stream crossings that will require hip boots.

    you'll want good ankle support and boots that fit well for walking.... walking on tundra is like walking on a waterbed with obstacles all around... it is NOT easy and its very deceiving in its appearance.

    I hunt caribou on the tundra with a passion.... I have a pair of knee high muck boots that work well. in less wet areas I have a pair of lowa hunters and I use a pair of barneys over boots for stream crossings.

    Make sure you condition the legs, knees, and ankles for tundra hiking.

    Greg

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    Thanks Greg, I have a pait of Lowa tibets ZI bought from Barney's for a goat hunt in pws, the following year I took them to Kodiak but I got to tell you they are tigh as can be. I dreaded putting them on every day. for sure I will get the over boots I hear they are very practical. For the mucks I used to wear lacrosse uninsulated ankle fit down here for teh everglades in sunny south florida but which one would you suggest I look at.

    As for the training. The closest thing I can think of is walking 4-5 miles on the beach sand. Any suggestions?

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jveiguela View Post

    As for the training. The closest thing I can think of is walking 4-5 miles on the beach sand. Any suggestions?

    Try walking on basketballs
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    are you kidding? is it really that bad?

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    Default hahaha

    basketballs might be a bit dangerous but the point is well taken.... the tundra can be WICKED to walk on... its mostly flat but the hussocks can be two feet high and very unstable.... so if you step on of them they can fold over and dump you on the ground or you can roll and ankle really easily... it'll go from relatively dry to knee high muck without any real obvious indicators.... (until you really know what your looking for in brush types and color patterns)...

    I would suggest the typical leg training like an elliptical and stair master... then add in some training called core kinetic resistance... Those are the activities that strengthen the small core muscles that support the big muscle groups.... do some research on it...

    what you want to do is start training the accessory muscles in you abdomen, hips, knees and ankles... this training will increase your lateral or side to side motion strength.... hiking on tundra forces you into a gait that is not like walking on pavement (straight up and down)... tundra is more liking walking on a waterbed... you are using lots of the accessory muscles just to keep upright..

    Greg

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    will do.

    how does it compare to goat hunts in pws? or compared to kodiak deer hunt?

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    Member danattherock's Avatar
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    Greg gave the best advice. It all depends on where you are. Tundra is not created equal. I have spent lots of time in NW Alaska and found areas that were high and easy to walk on for sure. Simply stepping between the tussocks, dry, and such. And I have been in some lower lying areas that I fell down on several times in 6" of water. Basketballs. Below is a pic I took about 80 miles north of Kotz.


    This bou walked up to us out of nowhere, circled us a few times, then stood there posing. Darnest thing I had ever seen. Not skiddish like whitetail in the south, that is for sure....

    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

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    muck boots,rubber boots, anything completely waterproof will be your best friend. I tried gore-tex boots up here last fall and ended up with soaked feet. Its pretty swampy in places and as has been stated the tundra varies greatly...from pretty firm to floating grass patches. Walking around can become somewhat comical when you suddenly dissapear up to your crotch in muck.

  10. #10

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    Buddies who have done that hunt swear by the Cabela's Perfekt Hunting boot.


    www.outwriteoutdoors.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sigler916 View Post
    Buddies who have done that hunt swear by the Cabela's Perfekt Hunting boot.

    I have a pair of these, and while i haven't used them in this application they are definately great boots.

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    Default Hunting boots

    I wore a pair of 10" tall gore-tex Meindl Alaskan Hunters this September. We spent alot of time walking through water but it was rarely over 2-3" deep. A pair of leather hunting boots worked fine, but remember to seal them up good before you go. A pair of Muck Boots or ankle fit knee highs would be great for the water but don't offer the ankle support which is really helpful out on the tundra.

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    Hip wadders, One thing people forget to mention is that after you down your beautiful bou, it is much easier on your back if you can bend down and put you weight in the mud or water and not be soaking wet. Also, it'such easier to wash the blood off your wadders. Last year I was on my way out of Happy Valley and I guy seen I was wearing wadders and asked me about them, My partner and I lent our wadders to these guys, one of them ended up with a nice P & Y Bou. About 2 weeks later he called to see if I recieved them in the mail, and said, he never would of gotten that Bou without them, because of the temps and water level.

    Terry

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