Results 1 to 11 of 11

Thread: Old Long Bow

  1. #1
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    495

    Default Old Long Bow

    This is a long bow a neighbor gave me as a kid, I don't know much about it looking to see if anybody on here does.It has on it
    J.H. Baker 15
    It is all wood with a velvet wrapped handle, with the tips being wood of the bow.
    I will try to add a coulp more pic's.
    Thanks for any help!
    Last edited by HuntNBgame; 07-02-2010 at 06:02.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  2. #2
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    495

    Default

    Here are the tips and a pic of the whole bow.
    Last edited by HuntNBgame; 07-02-2010 at 06:02.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  3. #3

    Default

    never heard of it, you may try tradgang.com they have a collectors forum on there someone would know. Or you could try looking up Dave Doran Archers Past. Or Suzanne St Charles (or Joe or Jay if you can find them).

  4. #4
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Hunter

    That is a very old bow! I don't know much about JH Baker, the info I have been able to gather indicates he was a maker of entry level target bows during the late 1800's. I can't be 100% sure from a few pics but I'm beginning to think you have got something special here. Note the small hole in the tip. Bowyers of the time used to drill holes like that in the tips to "reduce pneumatic pressure inside the bow" now of course we know differently. There is a J.H Baker sited in "the witchery of archery" (ca1878), "The theory and practice of archery" (ca 1867 by the famous world champion archery Horace Ford) I even found an add for his sporting goods store in "the daily globe"(St Paul Minnesota) from may 20, 1880. I too think a visit to trad gang or a local expert is in order. DO NOT string the bow or let anyone talk you into selling it till you have talked to 3 independent sources! Personally I'd be on the phone with the archery expert at the smithsonian, especially if I was as close as Jersey.

    PS Hunter has been trying to get pics to me for some time, this has been driving me nuts for days.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  5. #5
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    495

    Default

    Thanks Rick, No I wouldn't dare try to string it, or sell it. UNLESS
    Now you have me excited, I'll have to start looking into some of the places listed.
    I guess the ends are what you talked about being horned?
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  6. #6
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    No your bow dose have wood tips, but the shape is characteristic of the time period. More expensive bows of the time had horn, sometimes buffalo or steer for tips, very much like a classic English longbow.Of course the limbs could have been shortened to increase draw weight but I'd have to actually see the bow to determine that and even then I may not be able to tell. Again I caution you that all this is based of a few pics, but I do think there is enough here to warrant further research, starting with someone with a better working knowledge of late 19th century bows. I am far from a expert and bows of the 1950's and 60's are more my area.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Craig on POW
    Posts
    166

    Default

    Try Jay St. Charles at Pacific yew Long bows. His website is selfbow.com. Suzanne St. Charles can be found at nwarchery.com. The St. Charles' are great people. Or as TradBow mentioned Tradgang.com is a great resource.
    Pretty cool looking old bow.

  8. #8
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    495

    Default

    I posted it on Tradgang but I do not have a photo Bucket account yet. So I was unable to post any pic's.

    Rick, I looked up the Smithsonian and it sounds like they get to many inquries to call to talk to anybody.I will have to do more digging.

    Ibohnt, Thanks I'll check them out next.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  9. #9

    Default

    Rick,

    believe it or not it's a common feature on english lonbows, that hole. It's not for stress releif, it's for 'tying in' a string keeper.

    Dave Doran is a heckuva history buff...I'd definatly give him a try also!

  10. #10
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    New Jersey
    Posts
    495

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    Rick,

    believe it or not it's a common feature on english lonbows, that hole. It's not for stress releif, it's for 'tying in' a string keeper.

    Dave Doran is a heckuva history buff...I'd definatly give him a try also!
    I called and spoke with Dave this afternoon and I emailed him the pic's.
    He was going to pass it around to some of his Bow guy's. He also thought it might be as old as Rick thought it was. And also thought it to be Old English. Pretty cool either way.
    [SIGPIC][/SIGPIC]

  11. #11
    Member Rick P's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer Alaska
    Posts
    2,339

    Default

    Tradbow

    I should have been clearer, the hole is not characteristic of English long bows but American target bows of the 1800's.

    Hunter

    Glad to hear you were able to get hold of someone with a better working knowledge of these bows, fascinating stuff really.
    BHA Member
    Bowyer to the forces of light in the land of the midnight sun.
    The 3 fold way: Every step we take as we walk through life effects, our family, our comunity and ourselves. One should walk thoughtfuly.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •