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Thread: Shoot broadheads the same as field points?

  1. #1

    Default Shoot broadheads the same as field points?

    I have read a couple articles of how you can tune your bow to shoot broadheads and field points to the same location and sight picture. Is there any easy method of adjustment?

  2. #2
    Member SusitnaAk's Avatar
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    http://www.eastonarchery.com/pdf/tuning_guide.pdf What is easy? There are no short cuts You have to do your homework.

  3. #3

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    exactly, definatly wont be easy...can even get flustering, but in the end it's fun!

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    Moderator Daveinthebush's Avatar
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    Default And

    Quote Originally Posted by TradBow View Post
    exactly, definatly wont be easy...can even get flustering, but in the end it's fun!
    And you just might learn something about archery in the process. Which is always a good thing.

    Vietnam - June 70 - Feb. 72
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    Try some G5 Strikers, not the Montecs but the Strikers. They shoot **** near the same as when I'm shooting field tips. I've also heard Slick Tricks will do the same thing.

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    Thumbs up Nitrons for me...

    After trial and error and plenty of $$$ spent on broadheads that work "for other" folks, I have found that the NAP 100gr Nitrons fly the best for me. They hit where my field points hit. That's the key. If it's a well made namebrand broadhead that hits where you aim your fieldpoints, go with that one regardless of what other "experts" will tell you. For example, my arrows are Gold Tip 7595's w/ a 28" draw. They're 405 gr overall weight right at 300 fps. If your similar, try it. I've been using them now for several years on plenty of blackies, moose, a coyote, and caribou with GREAT results. I haven't shot any other broadhead in over 6 years. If it ain't broke, I don't fix it... Good luck on your quest. My .02...

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    Default For what its worth...

    When I went from 100 gr field points to HellRazor broadheads, I found no different in flight, they hit the same spot.

  8. #8

    Default Safety, ethics, and knowledge about your gear is why I'm posting this.

    IMO if you are choosing a broadhead simply because it supposedly flies similar to your field points you are taking a dangerous short cut and making an uneducated and foolish decision.

    My appologies if my post appears to be attacking in nature.. that's not my intent.

    Broadheads are tools.. each type has a specific place for use depending on the type of bow you use, the type of game your hunting, the conditions of the hunt, and the arrow spline/bow weight, etc. you shoot. Archery is not like other forms of shooting where you don't have to fully learn your gear in order to be accurate under various conditions. Learn what shoots best with your set up, form your own educated decision, and take this time to further enjoy your sport.

    When I was shooting full time, I shot an average of 300 arrows week nights and more on the weekends. I knew my gear and what it would do. I knew how arrows would act with smaller fletching and a heavier weighted tip or specific broadhead. I also tested each broadhead to see how it would stand up shooting through various material to test durability.. a 55 gallon steel drum was my favorite test. Very few broadheads stood up to that test.

    I don't mean to preach or come accross as holy'r-than-thou.. I just personally have a hard time with hunters - especially archers, who take short cuts. Why? In my years of experience they are usually the ones who make errors that end up making us look bad in the field - or injure game.

    Case in point, in Michigan, a friends friend used one of these types of broadheads to 'save some time' preparing for a hunt with me since he never harvested a deer. At 20 yards the arrows flew close to the same so he figured they would fly the same further down range. He was an average shot at best. Sadly, he learned the hard way the arrows flew much differently at 40 yards with a slight breeze when he injured and lost a trophy class whitetail deer on one of my prize stands.

    He learned a valuable lesson and never hunted with me again.
    "He should have been packing a more powerful gun...you have to be a very good shot or very lucky to stop a brown bear with a .357 Magnum." - Rick Sinnott, Alaska Department of Fish and Game biologist after a double attack by a grizzly.

  9. #9
    Member TRKYHunter's Avatar
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    Default Broadhead Shooting

    The first thing is to ensure your bow is properly paper tuned. If it isn't you don't have a chance to get any tip to fly right. Everyone has their favorite bow & broadhead. I shoot a Mathews Switchback XT & 100g G5 Strikers on Easton Axis arrows. I have never done anything to the setup outside of papertuning the bow. I shoot groups the size of a small pie plate with broadheads at 60 yds. As we all know, not all broadheads "fly like fieldpoints" as they claim. The slick tricks also fly well, just the ones I bought had dull blades, so I was turned off.

  10. #10

    Default I'll start back with a paper tune

    Thank you to all of you for your insight. I shoot decent arrows, Aramid KV 350 (Carbon Express)and G5 Striker broadheads. I was able to take a moose this year with great accuracy. I just notice that when I shoot field points at 30 yards I am 3" to the left while my broadheads are shreading the bullseye.

    I think there must be some tuning that I am overlooking. I will "Re-start" the tuning process and see where I end up. Thanks again fellas!

  11. #11

    Default

    left and rights are a spine game. The easy thing with a compound is you can tweak your weight just a skosh to bring things in alignment with eachother.

    OL Adcock has a great tuning method that is not a bow derivitive. Though it's more geared for stickbows you can get what you need from it and run.

    http://bowmaker.net/index2.htm

    Scroll to the the bottom the last picture is what I think you want. IMHO I'd say you are slightly weak in spine. IE broadheads hit right field points hit dead on (figuring you changed your sights so your bh's impact the bull making your field points shoot to the left?!?!) If thats the case you could nock a pound or two off your draw weight and see what happens. maybe start with a 1/4 or 1/2 turn on each limb go back and shoot. Just some fine tweaking is all it is...sounds like you are quite close!

  12. #12
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Trad has it exactly right. Left and rights are easy to fix. You can try weight adjustment..just a little.. and if that doesn't work, a little in or out on your rest.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  13. #13

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    you know I didnt think about it..but you could also try a lighter field point which would effectively stiffen your dynamic spine a tad. Dunno what ya got now, I know most compound guys are already pushign the light side when it comes to heads compared to trad guys. It's by far the easiest one to try....then again I guess you'd have to find some bh's of the same weight...or you could try the bare shaft to fletched shaft deal first....lots of options here. Again just some fine tuning stuff. Believe it or not, it's no different for trad guys, though adjusting the rest or changing the weigh is not possible LOL!

    Try that lighter tip with the current site pin settings and see if your impact moves to the right....just an idear.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Yooper74 View Post
    I just notice that when I shoot field points at 30 yards I am 3" to the left while my broadheads are shreading the bullseye.

    I think there must be some tuning that I am overlooking. I will "Re-start" the tuning process and see where I end up. Thanks again fellas!
    Stick with the Easton Tuning guide and you will be fine. Work through the steps of correct spine, bow cam/cable adjustment, fletch clearance, paper tune, then BH tune. All [98%] heads can be made to fly perfect- like FP's if the above steps are followed. Make very small adjustments. 1/32" can make a difference.

    A well tuned setup is very forgiving and a pleasure to shoot- good luck.
    “It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.” ― Aristotle
    “I'm not young enough to know everything.” ― J.M. Barrie

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    Member Mort's Avatar
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    http://www.archerytalk.com/vb/showthread.php?t=539460

    Here's a good visual and textual walk-through of broadhead tuning. After paper tuning and walk-back tuning, this is the step that got my broadheads and field points shooting to same point of aim. Don't know if this is the same as the Easton guide.

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