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Thread: Tools before Black powder,

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Wink Tools before Black powder,

    Did'nt want to hijack Strangers thread, so here is the place where no gun's are aloud.

    The first leathal one that I know of was the CLUB, lol, then they got a little more creative and came up with thing's that they could throw, deadfall's and other thing's, what are some of the thing's you remember from history, and what would be your best tool for hunting?

    Sorry Stranger for hijacking your other thread.

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    A most Excellent Thread, Rock Skipper, not a hijacking at all.

    Before the "Big Boom" from der Schootzenboomers, they used alotta cordage;

    I would venture to start with the Snare and the Net;

    Snares can be set on trails and in depth, such as on hill tops where herds of Caribou will run up when driven, as they always run UP the hill.
    Hundreds of snares would net you a small herd of Meats in Winter, and asure you of plenty of food and skins.
    My fatherinlaw grew up setting snares along the Kobuk River for the Crossing Caribou, at the same place we catch them crossing the rivers in Fall. His family would gather meat and skins in large quantitys when the weather was perfect to do so.
    Snares can be set for Moose to Mouse, and Birds as well, with a line of snares set across a creek to catch birds by the neck, of in very shallow watewr to catch their feet.
    Also, small game rabbits, ptarmigan, just about evertything with fur ........well, you see.

    Nets are a great way to make a living;
    Fishing , of course, with a sein, you can catch any and all fish, by surrounding them and pulling them in.
    Gill nets will get you plenty , in regard to mesh size, Salmon and Herring , with whitefish inbetween, but yet, 3 different nets.
    Gill nets can also be used on land, in Salmon size'd meshes, to drive willow banks worth of Rabbits of Ptarmigan into, and hold them long enough to get their necks wrung.
    Nets are made and used to catch seals and small Whales up this way, big mesh, stout cordage.

    Silent, fairly simple and multi usefull, its a wonder what you can do with cordage.....

    I would probly carry a lance, all the time as well......
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Has anyone ever tried a spear with a thrower? By "thrower" I mean a long piece of wood that the shaft of the spear rests on and pushes the spear from the end when thrown, giving a little more throwing arm to increase the velocity of the spear.

    The guy who met the plane when I was flying mail into Scammon Bay had a setup like that he sometimes had with him in case he ran across a seal in his travels. I would have liked to try it, but the whole affair was such a beautiful piece of handiwork I was afraid to ask to touch it.
    Louis Knapp

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    Yes, An Atlatl, for chuck'n spears at Seals, Walrus and Whales, nowdayz, and darts for Birds and Game as well.

    They call them "Throwing sticks" up this way. My sons only use them with harpoons, but there are actually quite a few projectiles the Atlatal can chuck, and the main advantage, besides leverage, is that they work in the wet and rain, unlike alot of early Bows.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Default bola

    I would like to learn how to use a set of bola's. Basically, a three legged roped device with weights on the end of each leg, used for entangling the legs of larger animals and stunning smaller ones.

    The boomerang was always an interest as a kid, but I could never throw anything consistantly acurate.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Atlatl...what a cool device!

    I made one with my son last year to play with. Even our crudely made one was suprisingly accurate and would certainly be lethal on smaller game.

    I'm sure a larger one would be remarkably deadly with some practice.

    Check out the video on the net from "Atlatl Bob"- worth watching.

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    The spear is makeing a good comeback. Cold steel is makeing nice heads for them.Rock throwing has been popular,and we still see it here at times.

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    Well, regarding the interior Athapaskans, they were quite the flint knappers, and the microblade technology they used lasted quite a long time. Some pretty cool archeological finds from all over Alaska.

    It was interesting how late in coming to the north black powder was, really, the whole advent and use of the first rifles by Native peoples. Or a metal cookpot even.

    One of the best "tools" used back then was dogs, basically your own pack of wolves, to bay up large game. Something to remember is that in the interior people were nomadic and we didn't have what we see today with permanent villages people live in year round. There was a lot of opportunistic hunting too, like the Han killing swimming moose in the Yukon by paddling out to one in birchbark canoe and a person hopping out on the moose's back to slit its throat.

    Fences, corrals, pitfall traps, widely used in the interior for migrating caribou. And like Stranger said, snares were widely used too. Of course you first had to kill animals to make cordage strong enough to hold them. Though you could make "cordage" for catching fish from various plants and roots.

    Something else used too was chemical in nature, like aconite poison derived from monkshood roots and smeared on tips and points of weapons. So you didn't necessarily need something with a lethal point on it...just had to penetrate a bit.

    Basically, in the "old days," all that was available for tools was what one could find in nature, including all the animals. Various skills were needed; tribal members had to work cooperatively with different members having different skills. There was quite an expansive trade network too between regions, prior to the white man's arrival. So you may hear of an obsidian point, for example, being found today, but the obsidian itself came from an area hundreds and hundreds of miles away before it was locally knapped and made into bifaces or points.

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Well I can think of a couple that wer'nt mentioned,

    There was the old time sling shot, not like the morder one's, I think they were made out of hide's, (have to look that one up)

    Then the blow gun's were quit pop. with a poison dart.

    I bought a morden blow gun and praticed for hours with that thing, and got pretty good, lol I could put up a calander with one inch square's and hit the number I was going for 8 times out of 10 at 25 feet.

    Then you have the fire stick that was made with bamboo, it works on compressed air, one cilynder inside of another. It was founded back in the 1700's I believe, then was lost for for a long time, I'll have to do some research on that one to. This was just to make fires with.

    Mark I agree the dog's were probably the best tool's for the hunters.

    Ah I was in time to give you the address, lol www.primitiveways.com/fire_piston.html

  10. #10

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    I just made my first practice spear this weekend, 1/8in flat bar, 3in wide, 16in long. I did a little practicing with it off my porch (probably 12ft high) and I could hit a target at 15yds consistantly with a group of about 10in, with 2 dead center. I was mainly testing balacne and angles of throwing. The penitration was impressive. in one case it went though 6in of ice and about a in in the frozen ground. I can't wait to get home and play around with it a little more. Spring bear here I come.

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    Member akguy454's Avatar
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    Default animals

    I have liked the concept of falconry.

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