Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Wintertime Revolver Fun

  1. #1
    Member PMFB-RN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Currently in Wisconsin
    Posts
    75

    Default Wintertime Revolver Fun

    A friend of mine showed me how to do this and it has been a blast. Take some regular parfin wax and put it in a pan in the oven at about 250 degrees until it all melts and is about 1/2 inch deep. Allow to harden. Take primed brass (I am doing this with a S&W .357 mag) and push the open end down through the wax. This cuts a plug of wax. It is easier if you do it after the wax is cooled but before it gets too hard. You can shoot them indoors with just a bed sheet for a back stop. I taped a sheet to the open doorway to my laundry room and set up a box with cans for targets. The wax "bullits" knock them over with authority from about 25 feet away. Maybe farther but my living room isn't big enough to try it from further. I have used this set up to teach my female friends to shoot.
    Maybe you all know about this but I just learned last year and have been having fun with it.

  2. #2
    Member The Kid's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
    Location
    Los Anchorage
    Posts
    1,089

    Default Wax bullets

    Wax bullets are great fun, and pretty safe. You can ream out the primer pocket to take shotgun primers, this will give you a little more snort for longer range targets if your house or garage will allow. Converting to the bigger primer also lets you reprime without tools just push it out with a pencil and replace with your thumb. Be careful with the added power we dented a garage door in the shop from about 10yds.

  3. #3
    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Wasilla
    Posts
    1,555

    Default

    Thanks for the tip Emily, I'll have to give that a try when I get home.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

  4. #4

    Default

    Outstanding! I'm glad to hear that folks are still doing this.

    It's been 40 years since I last shot wax, but that doesn't mean I don't see the value, especially in limited settings. I got sidetracked by the ease of Speer's plastic bullets and cases while living in an urban setting, then quit completely once I left 35 years ago. I've been using lead round balls on top of 1 grain of Bullseye for lots more whop without much more noise, but that's another topic we can take up if you get your place in the woods.

    Speaking of noise, that's the one limitation on using your revolvers rather than an air pistol. Neighbors. Primers make plenty of noise in settings with thin walls. Heck, even air pistols are noisy in that setting.

  5. #5
    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    wisconsin
    Posts
    759

    Default

    i bought some speer "indoor loads" made with a plastic case and re-useable plastic bullet. using only a primer to power this load i stuffed a cardboard box with newspaper and started shooting. this was great fun until i saw the plastic bullets penetrated my target INTO THE SHEETROCK!LOL.
    a good lesson for me.

    good luck with wax, it sounds a lot safer!
    happy trails.
    jh

  6. #6

    Default

    in the book called no second place winner by Bill Jordan he used wax rounds to pratice with and told you how to pratice with the wax rounds at diff ranges from point blank range for pratice of drawing and fireing from the hip to 10 yard range fire from the drawing of the revolver from the holster ..

  7. #7
    Member PMFB-RN's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Currently in Wisconsin
    Posts
    75

    Default

    I've been using lead round balls on top of 1 grain of Bullseye for lots more whop without much more noise, but that's another topic we can take up if you get your place in the woods.

    *** I would very much like to hear about this load. I have wanted something to shoot rats with inside a barn. Even a .22 is too much inside a barn.

    Speaking of noise, that's the one limitation on using your revolvers rather than an air pistol. Neighbors. Primers make plenty of noise in settings with thin walls. Heck, even air pistols are noisy in that setting

    *** Not currently a problem for me as I live on 43 acres out in the country. I have two sort of room mates but they are nurses who live very far from our hospital and only sleep here two nights a week then go back home up north when their 3 shifts are over for the week. Besides one of them a man who is a total gun nut.

  8. #8

    Default

    Basically I size the cases, then bell the mouths and decap as usual. Cap and charge. I've got a little Bullseye tumbler-style powder measure that uses different tumblers rather than being adjustable. One of them throws 1.1 grains of bullseye. Charge with that.

    Now here's where it gets "interesting. In 357/38 I use .360 round balls intended for muzzleloaders, and in t 44 I use .430 round balls. When casting my own I cast with wheelweights, but if I buy they're pure lead. doesn't seem to matter at these velocities. Seat the ball down so the top is flush with the case mouth. Use your crimping die to knocks the bell off, but due to tight fit in the case, you don't really need a crimp. If you've got your decapping die adjusted just right for your gun, you can bell the case mouths just enough to help get the ball loaded without shaving lead, yet not so much that you even need to use the crimp die. It's a narrow range, and not possible if your cases aren't exactly the same length.

    As a final step smear a little lube around the gap between the side of the ball and the case mouth. Crisco is just fine, but I use whatever black powder lube I have on hand. You need just a little lube in there as a final measure against leading. The only time I had leading without the lube was when I shot enough to get the barrel hot. And that's the problem, they're so much fun to shoot, you kinda burn through them.

    I've never chronoed these, but on a sunny day you can watch the ball all the way to the target. I'm betting it's a little faster than a wrist rocket slingshot, but not much. "Kentucky windage" shooting at long range is really fun, because you can watch the ball and make adustments based on that. In all my guns these loads have been incredibly accurate. For a target, I just shoot a hole in the paper or board I'm using for a target, then shoot at the hole at 25 feet. If you miss, it's your fault.

    BTW- The balls have enough whop to completely penetrate 3/4" pine boards at 25 feet. Just dont be tempted to shoot at the knots for targets. The balls will rebound straight back and raise quite a knot on your own forehead. Don't ask me how I learned that little fact!

  9. #9
    Member AK Ray's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    South Central
    Posts
    2,541

    Default

    This is how we took out mice once in a while, but used just a magnum primer. Mom didn't like it and made us stop after the first night.

  10. #10

    Default

    Very interesting, I have never heard of doing any of this. We used to try to make rat shot using different types of wads and shotgun shot. I wonder if you could mix shot with the wax after you took it off the heat to cool? A lot of good things have come from talk such as this.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •