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Thread: Antique hunting tools

  1. #1
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    Default Antique hunting tools

    Heres a fetish of mine.....Mosin Nagants.
    Dependable, fool proof, strong, dependable, accurate isnt a good enough word for where this baby puts bullets, as well as a great trigger and awsome open sights

    A great hunting tool, of the deadliest kind.

    I own quite a few, still trying to get a more, as collecting them is a hobby of mine, though I actually only hunt with two of them, my M-39 Finn variations.
    A fellow member here took heart to the idea of presenting me with the opportunity to get some "hunting stuff", and there was the chance I needed to bought one more....just one more

    This is a true 1896 reciver'd Mosin in all its glory. I was able to have it mailed direct like, as the reciver is "Antiqe" and I didnt have to make a round trip to Kotz and spend more on the FFL fees from the gunshop guy, bless his soul.
    This baby was put through its paces a couple days ago , and when I had the "Feel" for it, I could hit a deflated basket ball 4 out of 5 times with it at 300 paces.
    Its basicly too long to use with a snowgo, but it certainly a part of our Camp gear now, and the young felow hgolding it, My second Son, has "ideas" about just how best to use it......he's visiting a couple days, and Ill track 'em if he leaves with iot ~~LOL!!~~
    Hes asked me to build him another "Scoot", a small sled with a white screen, so he can push his way up top Sleeping Seals easily enough during our Spring hunts.
    His scoot cradled an M-39 well enough, and with a wrap of white cloth, this rig will rock!

    Thanks, P.W.!!!
    I got your latest letter today, and heres the pict you requested....




    And just for the hell of it, heres a cool pict of skulls, all kill't with a Mosin Nagant

    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Sheesh, I thought this was gonna be about microblade spears or atlatls or something, what's this with rifled barrel weapons that use gunpowder <grin>.

    I got a fetish that ain't near as expensive as yours Stranger...and I'll leave it at that.

    Bunch of nice ox skulls there. Wish we had those critters here.
    Cheers,

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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    Heres a fetish of mine.....Mosin Nagants.
    Dependable, fool proof, strong, dependable, accurate isnt a good enough word for where this baby puts bullets, as well as a great trigger and awsome open sights

    A great hunting tool, of the deadliest kind.
    That's amazing. Until, you started posting about them I thought they were mostly JUNK. You make them sound very practical.

    I never would have guessed, and probably wouldn't have believed it, if it didn't come from you. Does anyone else, besides you and your family use, and liket those Mosin Nagrants?

    Smitty of the North
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  4. #4

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    Excellent! I especially like the fact that you can mail them.

    I'm a nut for old stuff, black-powder era cartridges and their guns for many years, and more recently traditional muzzleloaders, so I can relate completely. The new guns and cartridges are great too, but when you sort through all the marketing hype and testosterone, the old stuff is mighty fine, too. You just can't shoot as far with most of them, so I'm really impressed with your 300 yard accuracy. Folks obsessed with fastest and flattest and highest tech are welcome to their passions, but they don't know what they're missing.

    Keep up the good work. You've raised your 2nd son to have great taste!

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    Member pinehavensredrocket's Avatar
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    i think townsend whelen said "only accurate rifles are interesting", but certainly this includes old designs. reading strangers posts it is clear he has a very good understanding of practical hunting accuracy.

    this generation was raised on optics of the highest quality, offering improved sighting and a higher probability of shot placement. with practice however irons are extremely accurate, and sometimes a better choice. GO STRANGER!
    happy trails.
    jh

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    Member AKsoldier's Avatar
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    Those are indeed fun Stranger! I've had two - an M 91-30 and an M44. They were both quite accurate and great fun to shoot. I don't have them any more, but I wouldn't mind getting another one.

    The other 299,300,000 people can have it.

    Noone has a more intimate understanding of, or deeper appreciation for freedom, than a soldier who has fought for it in a country where it does not exist.

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default fooled

    I too got fooled. I was expecting something really old.

    I found an ancient arrowhead made from petrified wood in the Basalt cliffs of WA state and was hoping others were sharing stories of old hunting implements.

    I used two of my grandpas rifles this year. One was built in 1955 the other in 1965. Thats not exactly old but fun. The 721 is a very accurate iron.

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    Well, Antique, not Ancient ....~~LOL!!~~

    accuracy is where its at!!
    The Finns reworked rifles captured from the Russians or bought them from various countrys that had captured them in WWI. They had to shoot 5 cm at 100Meters to be accepted, and the parts were worked untill a rifle was made that could.
    Civian marksmenship in Finland, especially in the 20's and 30's was as national as football is here today.
    In two wars, Finland alone stopped the soviets from taking over the country.
    The world highest scoring sniper, Simo Heyha, scored 542 confirmed kills hith his personally owned M-28/30, he brought to war when his Civil Guard unit was called up. He killed many many more with a submachinegun, though actuall kills were not counted during attacks, as they were too busey to count.
    He fought 98 dats straight, untill he was shot in the face.
    Remeber, the Russians used to line up like Brittish soldiers and march/run as a "human wave", but Simo shot them down as he saw them between battles with open sights and a fairly close quartes in the forests....hit and run, all day long.

    Actually, it isnt an expensive hobby at all.
    Back in the early 90's the GunShop in Kotzebue sold them as fast as the arrived and they were very popular, untill the ammo supply got slim, and Ive been buying/trading for those I come across as welll( I do have competion, for sure, Im noyt the only guy up this way that likes 'em) that me and Neal, the gunshop guy back then orderd bundles of Finnish Mosins 5 for 75$ and shipping, with an advertized "Cracked stocks, missing parts", but , oddly enough, and much to my joy , the stocks were hardly ever cracked, and the missing parts were usually sight slides, or sling swivles or a screw or two, so I ammased a nice collection on the cheap, cobbled the junk into Lamps and made my $$ back. What amazed me was the lack of rust, because the Finns had only kept the best, wit primo bores, no matter the type, and we were buying their surpluse.
    I later culled my collection for doubles and I settled in the various M-91's, M-24's, M-27's, M-28's, M28/30's, and M-39 Finn varients, as well as ,later, Russian types, M91's, M-91/30's ,M-38 and M-44carbines.

    My first go around with one was a black stocked M-91, more than 3 feet long and UGLY..."what Junk" I thought, untill I shot it------"****, Ya~~I gotta get me onea these!!" and I bought the thing about a week later from the guy.....and so many more over the next few years.

    You can still get an M-39 for under 200$, and they are the Best of the Best.
    Try reading about Finnish army shooting standards, and when you see these are assembeld by Tikka, Valmet and Sako, you know your holding quality, despite the looks.

    As foir Antiques, My .42 caliber(10.6 mm) Blackpowder Berdan II Carbine singleshot made in 1876 is the oldest rifle Ive ever killed a Caribou (actually 2) with and that baby blerw massive holes right on through them....and its the Daddy of the Mosin Nagant line


    Bighore, I have box's of artifacts, Jade Ulus, Chert arrow heards, Ivory dolls, scrapers, hammerstone, ect...we pick them up as we walk along the beach , after storms.
    I should take pictures and post........
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Jade

    I'd love to see the Ulu......in jade, thats cool!

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    Stranger,

    Did the various artifacts you found appear randomly on the beaches or have some native burial sites succumbed to beach errosion?

    While I was stationed out at Port Clarence for a year in 99'/2000, I came across quite a few sites that weren't that far off the beach. Of course I left them alone out of respect for the dead and native culture, but I knew that there were times when these sites needed to be recovered to preserve the remains and artifacts that were buried with them. In fact, on one occassion I permitted a small group of elders and relatives to come over and re-bury some remains that they'd retrieved from another location. They wanted to re-bury the remains on the Federal land for personal reasons.....can't remember all, but I'm pretty sure it had to do with the fact that many from Brevig Mission came out there for seal camp.

    Just curious. I haven't seen a jade ulu before. Have you used one at seal camp or out on the tundra? I could imagine the jade could be made very sharp, but don't know how long it would hold an edge.

    Mike

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    All are random finds, spilled out from erosion.
    I find Human bones alot, and once we found a frozen man in the permafrst, curled into a ball, dressed in Caribou...scary. He dropped into the river I guess, as he was gone later that summer when we returned.

    Folks up this way were rarely buried, most had wood or such piled on them, as digging into permafrost is very difficult.
    I dont dig.
    The bulk of our collection come from the familys private propertys, our camps, and alot from the seashore, at low tide.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    My Berdan II Carbine


    an old fishhook


    Net weights and a childrens toy bow, that also had an ivory wrist guard nearby, also a childs fit.


    The Ulu's in the case are a Slate bladed, ivory handled Ulu,above, and below that, the elongated Ulu below it it the Jade Ulu....too bad I cant find a good pict, its a beautifull green.... and the others , outside of the case are modern steel Ulus.
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    The original "lamp"...as in the "home" type. This one lit the Father in laws sodhouse as a youth, a family hierloom.



    A stone "pocket modle" oil lamp, for hunters on the go.....


    Heres your Atlatle's, though both are modern and my son's use them with their spears out in the ocean.
    the object below that is a socket'd head for an Adz, lashed to a handle, with a stone "bit" for a cutting edge.
    My wife is "Qalhapuk", an Adz head.....


    And ofcourse, my favorite "antiques", Mamoth tusks.
    These are fished from the ocean at low tide, and by boatdrifting/snorkaling along the shores, off mud cliffs.....

    I guess you could say that we hunt Mammoth ~~LOL!!~~ or is it "fish fo Mamoth?'" ~~LOL!!~~
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  14. #14

    Thumbs up

    Very cool!
    "If you are not working to protect hunting, then you are working to destroy it." ......Fred Bear

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    Member HuntKodiak's Avatar
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    Thanks for the pics! I enjoyed seeing the variety and explanations.

    Yeah, I should have used the term "bury" more loosely. Most sites I was were between tundra humps that were probably opened up some over time as they were used for protected camp sites. The burial on Fed land that I mentioned wasn't much more than the removal of sand and some material followed by placing a box over top, which was partially covered by sand.

    Must have been exciting to find those Mammoth tusks! The folks out of Brevig had fun finding occasional tusks too during Spring thaw, but more often they found pieces of sheath from the outside of the tusk and teeth in the rivers. That kind of hunt sounds fun too since you never know what lurks around the next bend or over the next hump.

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    Member Casper50's Avatar
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    I used my 130 year old Alex Henry double rifle this spring on this small blackie. It's the oldest rifle that I've taken game with so far.





    Trying this Model 1871 improved Martini by Westley Richards in 500 3" BPE next spring.


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    Awsome Casper..........

    In this day of "bigger, better" actually using what they did 100+ years ago, lets me know were just the latest
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  18. #18
    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    Default Simple and Solid

    I now have four Mosin-Nagants, 3 Russian 91/30's and a Polish M44. They are addictive as each rifle has its own arsenal markings and learning about all of the variations is hours of fun. Three of them actually have really good bores and shoot like they know it!
    Sierra makes their Pro-Hunter bullets in the correct diameter .311, in 150gr and 180gr.
    The 7.62 x 54R is roughly equal to the .30-06 in power.

    Ed

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    Cool thread. Thanks for all the cool pictures!

  20. #20
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    Always wanted to get into the making of (the org. tools, no gunpowder involved)

    Couple of sites for NON POWDER users, lol.

    www.atlatls-n-more.com



    Good thread tho.

    Here's another on but it might get canceled because of it's content, lol up to the people in charge.

    www.ssrsi.org

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