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Thread: Angled or straight spotting scope

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    Default Angled or straight spotting scope

    I am thinking about getting a spotting scope for the range. I'm not sure if I want a straight or angled spotter. How much is enough magnification?
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  2. #2

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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy View Post
    I am thinking about getting a spotting scope for the range. I'm not sure if I want a straight or angled spotter. How much is enough magnification?
    Happy, a little more info is needed to give any good suggestions. Such as what type of hunting you mainly plan to use the spotting scope with. Backpack hunting, or mainly off wheelers or boats?? Mainly spotting caribou a ways off or counting browtines on a bull moose a mile away??

    Lots of people here with great suggestions.

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    Member BRWNBR's Avatar
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    straight is easier to pack..angled is easier to look thru.. mine is angled and i won't go back to straight. just so much easier to look thru without having to lay on the ground at a weird angle...i've had both, but won't anymore.
    Www.blackriverhunting.com
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    Quote Originally Posted by BRWNBR View Post
    straight is easier to pack..angled is easier to look thru.. mine is angled and i won't go back to straight. just so much easier to look thru without having to lay on the ground at a weird angle...i've had both, but won't anymore.
    BRWNBR,

    I recently upgraded to a angled spotter just like the one you were sportin' in Nov. Digging the angled for sure. Now that I got my spotter I'll be ready to rock & ready to.......ok not really the latter

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    Default scopes

    Happy BRWNBR is right the angled are easier to look thru. I still use an old B/L 15 to 45 power straight tube. I have always had a bad habit of wanting to know whats over the next hill... so I have learned to pack light and this scope has fit that requirement for many years. The Liecia 60 power scopes are angled and very good but they are heavy. I have never needed more than 45 power and most of the time dont crank it past 30. unless you are guiding full time I would consider one of Leopoulds smaller scopes, they are very durable and fairly light.

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    I must be the odd ball of the group (wouldnt be the first time) but find the angled scope more difficult to use. I can point a straight tube at what I am trying to see and get it into position faster and easier than the angled.
    Power levels? On a really great day you may be able to see good at 40x. The majority of the time mine is set at 20-25. A sturdy tri pod is just as important as the glass you pick.
    Tennessee

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    Thanks for all of the help so far.

    Alaska_Lanche this will be primarily a rifle range spotter. I usually hunt with binos.
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    They both work well, but the straight piece is typically easier to align on target and the angled piece is generally more comfortable to view. Pick your poison. If one design was clearly superior for everyone there would only be one style. Alas, both are common and it becomes a bit like which is better, chocolate or vanilla? My advice Happy is to try and get a bit of time behind both styles and see which you prefer. I am a straight eye piece man. I'll not say its better; I just prefer it.

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    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    The nice thing about an angled eyepiece at the range is you can set your spotting scope to the side of your position and not take up room near or on the bench, without having to get out of position you can just look to the side and see thruogh the scope. I've not had the difficulties aligning on target that others have mentioned, as I just look down the top of the body of the scope and get it roughly lined up on target. Resolution, or clarity of the optics, is more important than magnification. If you can, set up a couple different scopes at the store and compare before you buy. Look at distant lettering on signs or similar to see which scope is clearest. Any scope, when operated at maximum magnification will usually sacrifice resolution, so back them down a little from max if it's a variable. The popular scope with high power competitors is Kowa.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I started out with a straight body and went to an angles one. I will never go back to a straight one, the odd shape and extra weight are well worth the comfortable viewing I now have!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Happy View Post
    I am thinking about getting a spotting scope for the range. I'm not sure if I want a straight or angled spotter. How much is enough magnification?
    For the range alone it does not matter if the scope is angled or straight. For spotting game afield I prefer straight scopes mounted on a tall tripod. This way I don't have to bend my body or neck to look down through the eyepiece. All depends on what you are comfortable with.

    I use a Nikon 15-45x (power) scope that has a 60mm lens in front. But the most important thing may not necessarily be the power or magnification, but clarity and sharpness.

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    I can remember when as a kid I spent the whole day squirrel hunting and ended up with a kink in the neck from looking up all day. A lot of serious glassing with an angle scope does the same thing only from looking down. I far prefer a straight scope!

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    Angled eyepiece is more versatile.

    For target shooting it enables you to setup and not have to move your position. In the field you can use the scope cradled in your lap, hands, from behind a tree or other obstacle. Most will have a sight hole to orient you near your target.

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    Got both - started out with a straight tube, decided to try the angled, but have gone back to the straight since seems to work a lot better for the type of hunting I do. For range work either will work, just depends how you set it up.

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    They both have there place, most pistol competitors favored the straight for their shooting box lids. Position shooters used the angled. I use angled for all of my spotting and love it for that use. One thing that is vary obvious is to stay away from the variable eye pieces. The fixed power deliver much clear and far better clarity. For the hunter I really do favor the angled scope put out by Leupold, it's light weight does give it a real advantage and small size makes it nice to haul around in your pack.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

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    1Cor15:19 described it best. They both have their benefits. I spend alot of time behind a scope during the summers and we always use straight as we are trying to put the scope on an animal quickly. If you need to aid accurately straight is the way to go. Just get a tripod that will suit you sitting up straight or standing up. If your going to be spending alot time looking through it and can't sit up straight or stand, get an angled.

    Is there any chance you will use it to hunt. I use a scope alot up here in AK, not much in the states. If you think you'll use it in the field, get as good of optics as you can and I say go for high power...maybe a 20-60x. If its just a range scope you can get away with cheaper optics and a 40-45x is plenty for the 100yd targets. Just my 2 cents so take it for what its worth

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    Quote Originally Posted by Big Al View Post
    They both have there place, most pistol competitors favored the straight for their shooting box lids. Position shooters used the angled. I use angled for all of my spotting and love it for that use. One thing that is vary obvious is to stay away from the variable eye pieces. The fixed power deliver much clear and far better clarity. For the hunter I really do favor the angled scope put out by Leupold, it's light weight does give it a real advantage and small size makes it nice to haul around in your pack.
    I have used both fixed and high quality variable spotters. W/ good glass and a good eye piece I can't see any bennefit to fixed power. My buddies swaro scope lets you find a distant object at 20x and then reel it in all the way up to 60 depending on conditions. I always get a kick out of people who claim 60x is usless, sure it isn't going to be magic and allow you to judge a ram to the inch from 5 miles, but at 400-600 yards in decent wether you can see the eyelashes on a sheep! Sure would make seeing those thin tips easier esecially considering a 1/2 inch can mean the difference of taking a great ram home, passing on it, or god forbid turning it over to fish and feathers and giving them a grand or more for their trouble!! As said since this is the shooting forum, I have little trouble seeing holes in paper w/ my 45x 20 year old tasco. With my ED Pentax cranked up I can tell you what size goup you just shot and if the rounds tore the paper at all.

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    Default What do you think of using a camera?

    My son's digital camera magnifies optically and digitally,and will video.
    It would take a third the space and half the weight , and record your event. and you dont have to have your face up against it to see what is going on .

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    Quote Originally Posted by Arleigh View Post
    My son's digital camera magnifies optically and digitally,and will video.
    It would take a third the space and half the weight , and record your event. and you dont have to have your face up against it to see what is going on .

    if you can hold it steady enough sure, i have a 34x optical zoom on my video camera and when i zoom all the way out it gets shaky.
    also dont forget the battery and charger... dont need that on a spotting scope.
    Josh
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    I wrestled with the angled vs. straight decision and opted for the straight version as I determined the straight would fit quite nicely in a vertical pocket in my pack whereas the angled would not. I'm pleased with my decision, but there have been times when an angled would have been more comfortable to use.

    WhiteFish

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