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Thread: One of my labs has problems with his ears..

  1. #1
    Member lawdog's Avatar
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    Default One of my labs has problems with his ears..

    this time of year. They stink a little and he's shaking his head. I took him to the vet a few years ago for this, but the powder they gave him was too caustic. It seemed to burn his ears. Does anyone use cornstarch or anything else to keep their dogs ears dry, and is it too late to treat this way once they really start to get bad?

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    He could have an ear infection, our dogs get them about annually and we end up getting meds from he vets to treat them.

  3. #3

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    What's going on now may be very different from what was going on several years ago.
    Yes, once they smell...the infection is in place and needs to be treated.
    There are many types of ear infections that can occur. Your vet will need to determine the cause to treat it properly. Different meds for different infections.

    As far as preventative....I use an ear cleaning solution. I buy it by the gallon from most pet supply places.

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    Member lawdog's Avatar
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    Default Thanks guys

    I'll get him in.

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    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    lawdog,

    One of the best products I have found available out there is the Oti-cleanse. Once you get the ear infection under control this stuff is wonderful for maintaining a clean/dry ear. Ask your vet about it....you can also get it here....

    http://www.1800petmeds.com/Oti+Clens...prod10161.html

    Something else I do since I have a breed that has ears that lay over. Is when they get baths, or are exposed to water they have cotton balls in their ears before hand. It keeps water and debris from coming in contact with the ear canal.
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

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    Supporting Member iofthetaiga's Avatar
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    For general maintenance you can flush his ears with a 50/50 solution of isopropyl alcohol and white vinegar. It's perfectly safe and works as well or better than the commercially available ear wash solutions.

    Once he's got a well established infection going you should probably have the vet check him, but thereafter if you periodically clean him out with the above solution you'll have no more infections.

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    Member Huntress's Avatar
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    That works too, in fact its been around much longer than most commercial cleaners. I personally avoid that mixture due to the fact that isopropyl alcohol does sting and burn if they have any sort of lesion in the ear. Oti-cleanse works wonders for us. It all comes down to personal preference
    "In the interest of protecting my privacy I will no longer be accepting Private Messages generated from this site and if you email me, it better be good!"

  8. #8

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    My lab gets them everytime I forget to completely dry her ears after a swim. I got a similar prodcut for our vet that huntress was talking about. Its alcohol based and will displace any water that is unreachable using a towel.

    When treating the infections my vet gives us drops. Applying the drops as directed, I have never seen an ear infection go past a week. Along with the drops, you will need to wipe out any yeasty discharge (if any) to help clear up the infection as well.

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    Member lawdog's Avatar
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    Default You guys have been a great help

    I really appreciate you taking the time to answer me on this.

  10. #10
    Member patrickL's Avatar
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    All good advice here. My wife use to work as a vet tech and stinky ears are classic signs of infection. They are easily treated and commonly occur when dogs are getting water in their ears. Its really important to get the infection out as soon as possible as chronic ear infections can lead to loss of hearing.

    If your dog is regularly getting wet from hunting or working in wet conditions you may need to use several of the products mentioned to keep the infection out. The key is to get the inner ear dry so the infection doesn't set in. We had alot of problems with our Gordon Setter. Those long haired dogs with hairy ears tend to be the worst to deal with.

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    Default color of gunk in the ears?

    Black/dark brown may be from swimming, dirty ears, or even allergies. That is not too hard to take care of. Any of the vet ear cleansers will work well. I've never tried the other home brews. You might also need the topical anti bacterial ointment
    White sticky gunk is another story. Typically that is a yeast infection and you may have difficulty getting a handle on it. Depending on how bad it is you might need more than the cleanser and topical ointment.
    It you can't get to a vet for whatever reason, keep in mind that any damage you cause to the inner lining heals slowly. I try to stay away from swabs, but when I have to use them I wet them first, even after flushing the ear with cleanser. The skin inside the ear is very soft, and having been wet with infection could abrade easily. If you are not used to digging around in there I suggest finding somebody that has done it. You can't hardly go to deep, but it is better to have something to gauge by.

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    Member lawdog's Avatar
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    Default Thanks Rat.

    It was brown. What worked for me in the past was to gently clean the inside of the ears with a napkin around my finger. Then puff powder into the ears to stop the moisture. I can't remember the name of the powder. I will grab some tonight on the way home. He hasn't been in the water since fall. Must have been left over from then. I think it comes on this time of year cause he's not outside getting the fresh air and running around getting air in his ears. Being inside so much in the winter, he's doing a lot more sleeping and a lot less running. All great stuff guys. Thanks again.

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    Member 3CBRS's Avatar
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    I used to use Oti-clens, but now use a homemade ear solution (did check with the vet). It is:

    12 oz. (a bottle) of 70% isopropyl alcohol
    3 tablespoons of boric acid powder
    2 teaspoons of glycerine

    Mix well, squirt in the ear canal, massage the outside base of the ear, and let the dog shake out the excess. Works well, doesn't seem to burn (even when one of my dogs had the ear infection from h*#l for 11 months), doesn't stain, and everything can be purchased over the counter. You have to ask at the pharmacy for the boric acid powder, but no prescription is needed.

    Karen

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