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Thread: Anchoring a large Zodiac

  1. #1

    Default Anchoring a large Zodiac

    Question is....how do you anchor with a large inflateable?? And even more importantly, how do you pull the anchor besides by hand??

    Now I`m sure the any of the front d-rings can handle the stress of being anchored...just curious if the d-rings are strong enough for buoy-pulling the anchor.

    Thanks in advance for any advice/experience.

  2. #2
    Member Rob B's Avatar
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    Default D Rings

    When I had my 15'9" zodiac, I tied a rope from each D ring on the sides near the front and routed them up to the front. The loop in the front went thru the main pull ring on the bow. I never had any problems pulling the buoy even in a tough tide. I just never did trust that pull ring in the front. I sure do miss that boat...........

    Rob

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    Default Anchoring Inflatables

    Was told this over 30 years ago and it works well to this day....put stainless steel eyebolts facing the bow into the upper portion of your transom. Run anchor rode thru the eyelets on each side of the sponsoons from the bow back and tie off to the eyebolts in the stern. All the pressure is now focused on the strongest part of your boat. Put a carabiner up front and this is what holds your anchor rode. You can use the bouy pull retrieve system to raise your anchor.

  4. #4
    Member Bullelkklr's Avatar
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    Default Whew -

    I would never have dreamed of bouy pulling with those D rings - I do like the stern idea - but I will be pulling by hand on a scotty shrimp pot pully mounted to a rodholder setup mounted to the wheel assembly bracket locations.

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    Default be careful, though

    Quote Originally Posted by ulflyfish View Post
    Was told this over 30 years ago and it works well to this day....put stainless steel eyebolts facing the bow into the upper portion of your transom. Run anchor rode thru the eyelets on each side of the sponsoons from the bow back and tie off to the eyebolts in the stern. All the pressure is now focused on the strongest part of your boat. Put a carabiner up front and this is what holds your anchor rode. You can use the bouy pull retrieve system to raise your anchor.
    If I read this correctly, not ALL of the pressure is at the stern. The two ropes will exert a pretty hefty pressure inward because they "want" to form one line. The transom will likely handle the force, but the bow D-rings may not.... always. Same idea when you hook two chains up to the tow hooks on a pick up and drag it out of the mud from one point on the towing vehicle. Frames have been pulled in that way.

  6. #6
    RMK
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    Cool word to the wise

    I've had a Zodiak Mk II Grand Raid for 20 years. I have anchored up on occasion, but I try to avoid it, especially in a strong tide. I use the smallest sized Bruce anchor with about 8 feet of chain. I think it's 2.2 Kilograms. Even that little rascal can get hung in a rock on put you in a world of hurt.

    Inflatables don't have much freeboard. Once the tide starts running, it can be a chore to get the hook loose. I've done it with a buoy. I have run my anchor line off the "D" rings on the sides and then through the front handle.

    I usually just motor "up current" from the anchor, and pull it by hand.

    I've even anchored up in calm waters from the gunwhale line. All of these points held up fine. I would never anchor up without a back-up way to get loose, such as a knife.

    I assume you're talking about ocean use. Most of my time is spent in lower Cook Inlet. I anchor up in the Kenai River, and it's not such a big deal.

    Anchors away....but be careful.
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    Default Bow D rings

    jkl...the amount of pull/ pressure on the sponsoon rings (not the nose ring) where the handhold ropes go is negligible. Have been anchoring in Cook Inlet with this system for 30 years and the boat never tried to fold.

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    Default OK

    ulfly: OK; glad it is working. As said, maybe I don't see exactly how the hookup is, nor do I know how big of a boat you have. I do know that if you have a fairly short rigging in a V and pull on the "point" (vertex) the two ends will pull together. When I was a kid, I nearly collapsed the frame on a truck pulling it out of a DEEP mud hole; bent both frame members in (tow hooks on each) pretty badly. An engineer I was working w/ just laughed when I told him, then he explained what happened. OK, after that it was "obvious", and I've hooked up singly since, just in case the pull is wicked. That truck was really buried and the tracked vehicle pulling it was working at it. It really does not take much force to hold a smaller boat, as evidenced by how we can manually pull them up current fairly easily... fairly. I anchored my little 16' Zodiac similarly, but I tied to a rowing frame that was fairly stout. I, too, never figured that front dee ring would hold, but maybe it would have. ???

  9. #9

    Default

    Thanks for the resposes and explanations guys.

    I rarely anchor but could see having to in Cook Inlet. I kinda figured it would be best to pull by hand but if I could be lazy and pull with a bouy I probably would.

    Anywho, in a couple months I`ll have practical experience!

    Tight lines all....

  10. #10
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    Default

    We anchored a zodiac once in Cook Inlet. The tide got so strong, the nose started pointing down and shaking, I thought the ring would tear off. It was almost impossible to remove the anchor by hand as well, took about 10 minutes to break the anchor/rode free, due to such stron current.
    I was told a story once: a group of people anchored a zodiac, two minutes later all of a sudden the noze dove down, and the zodiac was 3 ft under water, level to the surface. Occupants were still able to stand on it, but could not retreive the anchor line themselves. They were saved by other boaters.

    I sure won't anchor in cook inlet again.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vadimb View Post
    We anchored a zodiac once in Cook Inlet. The tide got so strong, the nose started pointing down and shaking, I thought the ring would tear off. It was almost impossible to remove the anchor by hand as well, took about 10 minutes to break the anchor/rode free, due to such stron current.
    I was told a story once: a group of people anchored a zodiac, two minutes later all of a sudden the noze dove down, and the zodiac was 3 ft under water, level to the surface. Occupants were still able to stand on it, but could not retreive the anchor line themselves. They were saved by other boaters.

    I sure won't anchor in cook inlet again.
    Good advice! I`ll save the anchoring there for the big boat.

  12. #12

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by vadimb View Post
    We anchored a zodiac once in Cook Inlet. The tide got so strong, the nose started pointing down and shaking, I thought the ring would tear off. It was almost impossible to remove the anchor by hand as well, took about 10 minutes to break the anchor/rode free, due to such stron current.
    I was told a story once: a group of people anchored a zodiac, two minutes later all of a sudden the noze dove down, and the zodiac was 3 ft under water, level to the surface. Occupants were still able to stand on it, but could not retreive the anchor line themselves. They were saved by other boaters.

    I sure won't anchor in cook inlet again.
    That would have been a good time for them to have just cut the line and leave the anchor. Been a long time since I had an inflatable in Cook Inlet, but I used to anchor only when the tide wasn't ripping and would pull the anchor by hand. Someone pulling the anchor while motoring toward the anchor.

  13. #13

    Default

    The 16 ' achilles I used to run we would drive into the anchor line then pull by hand. Worked okay. If you can't get it pulled. Toss a buoy with your name and number on it. I've had a couple returned to me this way.

  14. #14
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    Default

    We tried motoring to the anchor as well, it did almost nothing. The current was strong enough to keep the rope tight all by itself. Almost seemed like it tightened even more, when coming towards the anchor.
    I would just drift, it's all flat out there anyways.

  15. #15
    Member e45colt's Avatar
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    Default Stern Anchoring

    Dangerous!

    Don't do it.

    Many references, like 3/09 Raiders linebacker Marquis Cooper who died(and others), when his boat sank while trying to retrieve a stuck anchor by tying to the stern.
    All it takes is one wave over the stern.


    Ed

  16. #16
    Member AKMarmot's Avatar
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    Default interesting

    I have always used the front ring so far without any problems. Use to anchor our 16' in cook intlet & pull with the buoy without issues, but haven't had the opportunity the last couple yrs to try it with the big one. Always use this set up for overnight anchoring but mostly in Swd so not worried about much.
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    Default Sweet...

    AKM....sweet looking rig! I run a 17 foot Zodiac rigid hull nowadays so anchor off like a regular boat...What's your top speed on flat water in that ?

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