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Thread: Youth .22 opinions...Yours wanted

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    Default Youth .22 opinions...Yours wanted

    Hey all...

    I've got a boy turning 5 in March. I want to get him a .22. He is tall and lanky, only weighing in at 41 pounds. Not a lot of muscle tone, due to a medical condition that keeps him a little on the scrony side.

    So my question is.... Do I go with a smaller Crickett style .22 that will fit him now, but will be small for him in a few years OR go with a gun that is a little bigger such as the CZ or Savage Cub. The larger guns will be a little heavy for him right now and will either cause him to fight the fore end weight unassisted or he will need assistance.

    I think I am leaning towards the smaller gun so he can carry and sling it now and have success NOW. and if he needs a bigger gun later then I can get him one.

    Someone else out there has had this same decision to make.... any ideas?

    Thanks in advance,

    AK1032

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    Member Diesel Nut's Avatar
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    Get the smaller gun and let him grow into a full-size rifle later.

    The shooting form he learns now will be with him forever, and if he learns on a too-big weapon, those bad habits will be an obstacle to overcome every time he shoots a rifle.

    Another option is to buy the bigger gun and modify it to fit his ability. Shorten the stock, lighten the overall weight, etc. When he gets bigger, you can glue the buttstock remnants back in-place to match his physical stature.

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    Agree with getting the gun that fits now. A big guy can shoot a short gun, but a small guy can't shoot a big gun. So even with a shorter gun, he'll be able to use it for longer than you might think. And it can be modifed upwards as time passes.

    You might also consider something with lots of stock options like a 10/22. You can get an adjustable or short stock for it now and then easily change it up as the years go by. The receiver will last a lifetime and beyond.
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    Default Scope options...

    Thanks for the advice...

    I am debating between a simple red dot (1x) so he can, again, have success or a fixed 4x32.... Any ideas here? My concern is teaching the crosshairs idea to a five year old....

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    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    No electronic "aim-for-you" gizmos and forget about scopes. Kids need to learn iron sights. I wouldn't even consider a scope until all the concepts of sight alignment, trigger pull, and stance/position are mastered.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Default When mine were little

    I started my kids with BB and pellet guns Untill they had proven their level of responsibility . That did not stop them from makig mistakes but all in all the training was worth while. We enjoy the pellet guns to this day any way. cheaper to shoot and generally safer.
    My daughter is a better shot than I actually. we play a game.
    taking soda cans starting 6' away from each participant,taking turns one shot at a time, at the end of 10 shots the can that is furthest wins.
    This game gets to be a lot of fun especially if you are shooting against the wind.

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    I agree with get a gun that fits him now and then get progressively larger as he grows. The BB gun is a great teaching tool as are the smaller crickets, and youth model 10/22 depending on his size. Don't go cheap and get a gun he can not comfortable carry or aim. His frustration level will rise as his fun level drops.

    For sights, I used to be an iron sight first mentality, but found my kids enjoyed shooting scopes more. And they are more participant in learning if they enjoyed the activity. So, if your son enjoys the scope or red dot, go with that and teach the basic skills. As your son gets older you can always introduce iron sights as a challenge, he'll enjoy the variation once he has confidence in his abilities.

    With any sight, making training aids help. Make larger scale mock ups of the sight picture and target. Use them to demonstrate the alignment and aiming techniques you are teaching. A card board circular cut out with cross hairs that can be placed over a target helps him visualize what you are talking about.

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    Lots of options out there. I started my daughter (who is of small stature) on a Henry Mini Bolt that came with the fiber optic open sights when she was around 6. This rifle weighs right at 3 pounds and has a trigger pull of just under 3 pounds. The mini bolt has the safety features of being single shot and you have to pull the bolt back before each shot.

    2nd - as she progressed we picked up a 10/22 and put a scope on it. 3rd - 8th grade graduation was a Ruger MkIII. A few Birthdays and Christmas presents were parts for a custom 10/22 she put together (with my help). At 15 she shoots for the school rifle team.

    The progression worked well - I just wish I could shoot as well as she does. Shooting her mom's 30-06 moose hunting last fall at 15 was no problem for her. I have come to realize that a side benefit from having kids is you now have a reason to buy more guns. I am thinking Mod 70 Extreme may be next in line for her!

    Safety, respect for the firearm, and getting out there and having fun are the important parts.



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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I picked up a CZ Scout for my daughter and I'm really impressed with it. It's accurate, light, and the iron sights are adequate.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Two keys for starting out anyone in the shooting sports, a gun that fits, and a good trigger. Unfortunately the good trigger part is harder to find than a gun that fits.

    Get the highest quality 22 you can afford, and if the stock is too long, just cut it down. Drill a 1/2" hole through the stock a couple inches deeper than where you will cut the stock, then as he grows, you put a 1/2" dowel in the hole and glue the cut off portion back on.

    You can still shoot a too short stock accurately, but you'll never be able to get into a proper shooting position with a stock that is too long.

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    I think the most important two items to consider are Safety and Fit. Started my youngest with a Marlin Little Buckaroo single shot bolt action .22. Its a tad bit bigger than the chipmunk but I didn't like safety and the idea of de-cocking. It was a little long and for him at 9 years old and he was smaller than average so I cut off 2.5 inches of stock and saved it. I fabricated a new butt plate with a piece of black plastic and put it all together. It was perfect and safe single shot. Later as he grew, I dowled, screwed/glued the stock back on, refinished the stock and put the original but plate back on and he is still still shooting it at 15. Its a little short for him but its a cool little gun and a tack driver and fits in a pack. He still likes it better than his 10/22 for hunting small game.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ralph View Post
    With any sight, making training aids help. Make larger scale mock ups of the sight picture and target. Use them to demonstrate the alignment and aiming techniques you are teaching. A card board circular cut out with cross hairs that can be placed over a target helps him visualize what you are talking about.
    Thanks for this piece of advice. Very good!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    A few Birthdays and Christmas presents were parts for a custom 10/22 she put together (with my help). At 15 she shoots for the school rifle team.
    Was this the blue 10/22 I was drooling over a while back?

    I see that T/C came out with a new youth .22 called the HotShot. 30" long and 3 pounds. The rear peep sight that comes with the rifle might aide in learning the skill. They just came out with it during the SHOT show, so theres not a whole lot on it but information on their website. Check it out...

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    Two keys for starting out anyone in the shooting sports, a gun that fits, and a good trigger. Unfortunately the good trigger part is harder to find than a gun that fits.

    Get the highest quality 22 you can afford, and if the stock is too long, just cut it down. Drill a 1/2" hole through the stock a couple inches deeper than where you will cut the stock, then as he grows, you put a 1/2" dowel in the hole and glue the cut off portion back on.

    You can still shoot a too short stock accurately, but you'll never be able to get into a proper shooting position with a stock that is too long.
    CZ Scout
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    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Was this the blue 10/22 I was drooling over a while back?...
    I believe it is probably the same one. It is really a sweet shooting rifle. She is now collecting parts for a similar version of a Ruger MKIII - Starting to think my kid is spoiled!


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    Another vote for the CZ 452 scout. I got one for my girlfriend and it is a MOA gun with factory sights at 50 yards. It's easy to disasseble and clean also.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MNViking View Post
    Another vote for the CZ 452 scout. I got one for my girlfriend and it is a MOA gun with factory sights at 50 yards. It's easy to disasseble and clean also.

    I am not familiar with CZ rifles - are they made in the US?

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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    I believe it is probably the same one. It is really a sweet shooting rifle. She is now collecting parts for a similar version of a Ruger MKIII - Starting to think my kid is spoiled!

    Yup, that things a 'beaut. Where did yo uget the rings for it? I did see the MK III receivers and whatnot on midway. Would be cool to have a matched set for sure!

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    Quote Originally Posted by rambling raven View Post
    I am not familiar with CZ rifles - are they made in the US?
    I believe they are all made in the Czech Republic. There is a CZ USA but I'm pretty sure that is just the distribution company.
    Finally, Brad Childress is GONE!

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    Default Youth 22

    My son (7) has the Henry mini-bolt, and my daughter (5) has the pink cricket.

    Two things...

    1. Get the weapon that fits now. Someone else mentioned that they'll be able to shoot it longer than you think, and that's true.

    2. Stay away from scopes for now. The Henry came with three-dot style hi-viz sights, which are okay; but the cricket came with a rear peep that is simply great! Both guns are incredibly accurate, but we all (to include my wife and I) love to shoot the little pink machine because that peep is so easy and accurate.

    My children have been told that when they can bring me 3 squirrels, 3 grouse, or any combination thereof that I'll teach them scope shooting. The cricket came with a scope and mounts, I've purchased a scope and mounts for the Henry but it will require some gunsmithing.

    I recommend the cricket...it can be had in wood, synth (multiple colors), or in laminate (again multiple options). It shoots great, is light, and seems to have a slightly shorter LOP than the Henry. Again, the rear peep is great.

    v/r

    salcha star road

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