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Thread: Yellow Trout... Has anyone else seen anything like this???

  1. #1
    jajaja
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    Default Yellow Trout... Has anyone else seen anything like this???

    Hey guys, I ran into a farmed rainbow trout tank and found a yellow rainbow trout. Weird. I tried to google it or did a wide web search on it but couldn't find anything about how it became to be.

    Just curious, has anyone else seen anything like this????

    This is the second time I have seen this and only in farmed tanks, never in the wild.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Yellow Rainbow Trout.jpg  

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    Member bigcox's Avatar
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    Probably a Golden Trout...

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    Default Second the Golden Trout

    It looks like a golden trout to me - not the Kern River headwaters variety but the hatchery fish stocked back East. I remember locating the holes where the Department of Natural Resources had stocked by looking for these guys standing out like a neon sign in the water. It's been nearly 30 years since then...thanks for dredging up old memories.

    David

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    Commonly called Palomino Trout in Pennsylvania. We use to look for them late in the season to find pools with lots of leftover stockies. I have caught a number of them and even had one mounted. They are a gorgeous fish but they would never survive in the wild. A private anglers club stocked a number of them crossed with steelhead in Lake Erie tribs and had a decent return of these ten pound yellow fish! Shortly there after PA Fish Com. put a halt to it.
    Here is info from PA Fish Commission web site:

    Golden Rainbow Trout Oncorhynchus mykiss
    Species overview: The golden rainbow trout is a gold-orange rainbow trout raised under artificial fish culture conditions and stocked as a novelty for angling sport. The golden rainbow was developed from one fish, a single female trout with a genetic mutation that gave her a mixed golden and normal rainbow trout coloration. She was found in the West Virginia hatchery system in 1954. Through selective breeding with regularly marked rainbow trout, an all-gold, golden rainbow trout was developed. In 1963, this fish strain was popularized as the “West Virginia Centennial Golden Trout.” Pennsylvania and other states hybridized the pure strain of West Virginia golden trout with normal rainbows and produced palomino trout, which were true genetic palominos. Palomino trout were first stocked in Pennsylvania in 1967. Since then, the genetic strain in Pennsylvania has weakened, but in recent years the hybrid was selectively bred back closer to the stronger, better-colored golden rainbow trout. Although palominos were stocked as both average-sized and large trout, today’s golden rainbow is raised only to trophy size for anglers and stocked throughout the state.

    The golden rainbow trout is a different species than the golden trout (Oncorhynchus aguabonita) of some California streams. In fish hatcheries, the rainbow trout has occasionally produced other unusual genetic mutations, such as the blue rainbow trout, whose body color is sky-blue.
    Last edited by akflyfisher; 01-27-2010 at 22:52. Reason: More info

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    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    She was found in the West Virginia hatchery system in 1954.
    It figures they would propagate a mutant.

    I remember seeing them from time to time either caught by others or hugging the bottom of trout streams when I was growing up in WV. My gramma's house was on two of WV (now) premier trout streams. My brother and I caught several rainbows out of them.

    Never caught a golden myself, but it wasn't for the lack of trying. A lot of times you'd see a crowd with fishing poles following the stocking truck.
    Now what ?

  6. #6

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    Looks like an albino rainbow to me. We used to get them occasionally in hatcheries back in the 60's and 70's, mostly when a hatchery had gone too long without new broodstock and inbreeding mounted. Doesn't look anything like a golden. Not even 2% close.

    I fished for and worked with goldens extensively in the same time period. We even brought some goldens back to a hatcheries and tried raising them. They did fine, but even though the brood stock more or less kept their original color at lower elevations, the next generation looked just like rainbow trout with none of the distinctive color. If you wanted to tell them apart without autopsy you had to get right down and count the scales on the lateral line. Don't remember exactly, but the goldens had something like 200-220 scales on the lateral line and rainbows had somewhere between 140 and 180, depending on the strain and crossbreeding. You could sorta "feel" that the goldens had finer scales in the bigger fish, but eyeballing catchable size was best with a magnifying glass.

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Wow! Pretty cool! I'd heard of palomino trout, but honestly never knew much about them. But this thread made me curious so I've been looking into it further. akflyfisher is spot on - looks like a golden rainbow trout.

    This is also from the Pennsylvania Fish & Boat Commision:
    http://www.fish.state.pa.us/images/p...out_golden.htm
    The golden rainbow trout originated from a single rainbow trout that was spawned in the fall of 1954 in West Virginia. This trout's body color was a chimera of golden and normally pigmented tissue. When this fish was crossed with a normally pigmented rainbow trout, the offspring (what we have come to refer to as palomino rainbow trout) were lighter in color.

    Golden rainbow trout and palomino rainbow trout are not sterile hybrids, they are simply color variations of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) and should not be confused with the golden trout (Oncorhynchus aguabonita) native to a few drainages in California.

    There's a couple good pictures of fly-caught golden rainbows on this blog
    http://www.wfn.tv/blog/Nick/930/

    On a side note, I've heard the California Golden has been reclassified as a subspecies of the rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss aguabonita) - either way they're beautiful fish. Golden's were transplanted from the Kern River in CA into several alpine lakes in Wyoming in the 1940s, so I've been fortunate to see some up close.
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    google "Banana Trout"
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

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    this a real CA golden trout.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails glodentrout.jpg  

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    and another
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails littlegolden.jpg  

  11. #11

    Default trout

    That first pic of the true California golden trout is a whopper! I love goldens-----mostly because of where they live in the high mountains. Fished for them a lot in MT, and saw a few of that large caliber, but not many. They are interesting spawners in that they apparently need some sort of lake/pond situated below a larger lake, with a stream flowing between them in order to successfully sustain themselves. I believe they spawn in the stream and then the juveniles spend the first year? or so in the lower lake-----then move up into the top lake as adults to repeat the cycle. Fishing for them sure seemed to be hit or miss, as I've heard they can really concentrate on small plankton type stuff. In alpine lakes that had an overabundance of them, we used to fry a few up with taters and onions we somehow managed to pack in with us-----best trout I've ever eaten, with flesh like a salmon. I also think they are the prettiest trout I've ever seen when they are in their spawning colors. Ahhh some good memories. . . . . .

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    Im going with Brownbear, that is a rainbow with albinism. It doesnt look anything like a golden

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    actually, i'm pretty sure powder monkey is right.... banana trout
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculpin View Post
    They are interesting spawners in that they apparently need some sort of lake/pond situated below a larger lake, with a stream flowing between them in order to successfully sustain themselves. I believe they spawn in the stream and then the juveniles spend the first year? or so in the lower lake-----then move up into the top lake as adults to repeat the cycle.
    That's probably just a Montana thing. In the streams of their own home range, ponding from beaver dams was a heck of a problem for spawning and fry production. One of my jobs back in the 60's was eliminating beaver dams and restoring stream habitat. Fun with dynamite. Can't beat it!

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    It is not a California Golden, it is a Golden Rainbow trout. It has nothing to do with the "CA Golden". They just call it a golden due to its color, hence the Golden Rainbow trout.

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sculpin View Post
    They are interesting spawners in that they apparently need some sort of lake/pond situated below a larger lake, with a stream flowing between them in order to successfully sustain themselves. I believe they spawn in the stream and then the juveniles spend the first year? or so in the lower lake-----then move up into the top lake as adults to repeat the cycle.
    hmm... I don't know about the two-lake situation, but they do (typically) need streams to spawn in. Maybe in the area you fished the only streams were connecting alpine lakes? I don't know. I know there are isolated lakes in Wyoming that having self-sustaining stocks of CA golden, but they all definitely have streams flowing into them. And I know of interconnected WY lakes that have goldens. Either way, they're pretty awesome trout. From what I've heard, it was loss of riparian habitat in CA through cattle ranching (trampling of stream banks) that really had a toll on goldens in?

    Regardless... whether golden rainbow trout, or palomino trout, or banana trout, or CA golden trout... if they'll take a fly and I'm in the vicinity they're all right with me.
    Pursue happiness with diligence.

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    Akflyfisher is correct,caught a few of them in and around lake Erie , then later in many of the stocked streams in Pa.
    Alex

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    Quote Originally Posted by tbag View Post
    this a real CA golden trout.
    Dude, I have never seen a golden that big. I never caught any over 9", granted I only had a couple of days after the hike in.
    ><((((º>¸.·´¯`·.¸¸.·´¯`·..¸¸ ><((((º>`·.¸¸¸.·´¯`·.¸¸><((((º>

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    Quote Originally Posted by akflyfisher View Post
    It is not a California Golden, it is a Golden Rainbow trout. It has nothing to do with the "CA Golden". They just call it a golden due to its color, hence the Golden Rainbow trout.
    Sorry, was replying to tbag on his picture of what looks like a huge CA golden. Ya, as far as true goldens being spawners between 2 lake/pond systems, I'm not sure either. I spent some time doing alpine trout research with some MT fwg biologists, and I thought I remember them mentioning something about that. But the only thing I've seen on goldens in my limited research is that they spawn best in slower creeks. I have noticed in the many high golden trout lakes I have fished that every one of them does have a pretty slow stream running out of them. The largest goldens came from lakes that were part of a lake/pond system, with a nice, meandering creek between them. In the lakes I fished, they fed on zooplankton, more specifically a red copopod (Diaptomos Shoshone). Most of the lakes that held the largest goldens were hell to get into, reminding me of present day dall sheep country, except at 9,000 feet or higher. As a kid, I knew a guy who caught some hogs using a red mepps spinner-----and now that I think about it, probably the reason that color worked. I caught a few on various flies, but did best on a wine colored san-juan worm. Probably should have tried some red scud patterns though. One of these days I'm going to actually leave AK in the summer to fish some of those alpine trout haunts again-----they were definitely the most stunningly beautiful places I've ever fished.

  20. #20
    Member H_I_L_L_B_I_L_L_Y's Avatar
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    Default golden trout

    Looks like a golden trout from back east. Ive caught hundreds of those grown up in west virgina. Very easy to spot in the rivers. Hillbilly

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